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Old 08-07-2015, 08:05 PM   #21
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We use our generator at anchor all the time. I, like others, enjoy the comforts of Air conditioning and heat when needed. Our water heater is usually off since it is fed by main engines running unless we are at dock or at anchor more than a day. I have a 15K westebeke that is really quiet both inside and out. My trawler is my home away from home, not my camp. No guilt here for enjoying the luxuries available.
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Old 08-07-2015, 08:39 PM   #22
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After unplugging from the shore, we rely on the engine's alternator. House batteries supply sufficient power for remaining continuously at anchor for two nights. (Gas stove, no electric coffee maker, a/c, microwave oven, television, or stereo system.) After two nights, I'm anxious to see new scenery.


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Old 08-07-2015, 08:53 PM   #23
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In my previous post I neglected to make an important point that is pertinent to the original post. My boat did not come with a genset and I was looking a many thousand dollars to install one. (which I did have on my sailboat). I was advised that with today's low cost and highly efficient solar systems that I may not need a genset. After doing the sums i Installed two 140 watt solar panels and controller for much less than $1000. This compares to about $10,000 for a genset. I can just keep up with normal use (with no AC). One or two more panels and I could waste electricity. And yes I am comfortable. The real advantage is that it is totally passive, silent and requires no operator intervention. Just leave it on and check the battery monitor once in a while.

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Old 08-07-2015, 08:59 PM   #24
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I have 12 6v golfcart batteries totaling over 1300 amps, I also have over 800 watts of solar power. Most everything including the television and satellite system is 12 volt. I also cook almost exclusively on a gas grill. I do use the microwave and run the generator for that Short time.
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Old 08-07-2015, 09:41 PM   #25
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Baker ,
I loved it and Catholic also . I new there was more about you I liked . Also on a trawler, troller or tug you can have real chairs to sit in outside . The transition is way easier than you think.
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Old 08-07-2015, 11:58 PM   #26
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This has been a very informative thread! Reading online and thru peoples blogs, nobody ever talks about this. It's like it's taken for granted that anyone doing it already know, lol. Unlike a sailing forum where you could return 1000 threads on this Or I could just be terrible at searching this forum

And Baker, that was hilarious! If I search long and hard enough, my next boat will make your hammer a necessity That's the plan anyways. . .

Those of you with the larger battery banks, are these custom or did the boat come that way? If custom, did you find it difficult to add the extra batteries?

Also, is there a way to save a thread for future reference? This is a thread I'd like to archive for future reference.

Thanks, and keep it coming!
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Old 08-08-2015, 12:18 AM   #27
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Hey - I've an idea!

Why not uae a peddle charger where each person aboard can peddle for exercise and charge the batts at same time. Great to stay in condition while saving money and creating/storing energy. Place an adjustable rate of amp load on the peddle charger and best workout occurs while even more amps get jumped back into boat’s batt bank.

This might suffice!

https://www.k-tor.com/pedal-powered-generator/
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Old 08-08-2015, 12:36 AM   #28
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OK, Cool Beans that is an interesting prespective

When we unplug from the dock everything on our boat works pretty much like it did at the dock.

On our Bayliner..., yes our Bayliner

We anchor out constantly in some of the remotest areas of North America, Prince William Sound Alaska.

Our boat is 100% self sufficient, except for Diesel Fuel.

We have a 800+ amp hour battery bank, and a 9KW generator with a large charger to recharge our house bank.

There is a 3,000 watt inverter that runs almost everything.

We make our own water
We process our own waste
We have the fuel endurance to go anywhere in North America and stay their relying on nobody or nothing for much longer than our food stash would last.

We also have TV
And internet anywhere in the world
And telephone anywhere in the world
And laundry facilities
And two refrigerators plus a large freezer.

So... When we leave the dock life is pretty much as it is dockside.
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Old 08-08-2015, 12:38 AM   #29
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This has been a very informative thread! Reading online and thru peoples blogs, nobody ever talks about this. It's like it's taken for granted that anyone doing it already know, lol. Unlike a sailing forum where you could return 1000 threads on this Or I could just be terrible at searching this forum

And Baker, that was hilarious! If I search long and hard enough, my next boat will make your hammer a necessity That's the plan anyways. . .

Those of you with the larger battery banks, are these custom or did the boat come that way? If custom, did you find it difficult to add the extra batteries?

Also, is there a way to save a thread for future reference? This is a thread I'd like to archive for future reference.

Thanks, and keep it coming!
TF "Search" feature is your friend! Placing applicable words/short-terms you can locate many threads regarding AC and DC boat power... as well as many other marine related items.
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Old 08-08-2015, 01:29 AM   #30
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Priceless! And, as a (fully recovered) sailboater I can vouch for that feeling of guilt when comfortable, at first. :-)
As and ex-yachtie, (southern hemi term), I felt no guilt whatsoever, and endorse John Bakers post 100%. However, having come from that scene does not mean one has to go whole-hog bourgeoisie. One can go a bit 'green', by that I mean renewable energy minded, yet still be comfy.

Others have already mentioned solar supplementation of charging, I always found using free wind the one real plus of a yacht, and have adopted a policy of not having anything AC on the boat when away from the dock, so we cope by adding in wind generation. Out there on the pick we are totally 12v, and LED lights, and propane for cooking. Hot water & charge from engine & heat exchanger on the move, and charge supplemented by solar and wind. Works for us, and without huge batt bank. I don't have thrusters, so only have a 150A/H start batt, and 2 100A/H AGM house in parallel. I can tap into the start batt if required.

Sorry, that second pic was supposed to be one showing solar panels - anyway, they are up on the aft area of the flybridge deck. Away from walked on areas, but not on the canvas canopy. Ah, found one which shows them, although it was not specifically of the solar panels. See pic 3.
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Old 08-08-2015, 06:58 AM   #31
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Sorry I cant help, we have no power hose , or inlet or AC CB panel.

No need the solar ( 1 85W panel) takes care of the radio and lights and fans , the reefer is propane , so once a month a 20# bottle is refilled.

DONE.
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Old 08-08-2015, 07:47 AM   #32
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Lots of good responses. Shows you the variance in the use of the trawlers. Important is how you are going to use your trawler. For fun I would divide the usage into three categories. Those who have 50 ft boats or are intent on duplicating the land base residential lifestyle and thus run the generator 24/7 when away from the dock, those who are marina based and take short anchoring trips with frequent moves,and those who anchor out long term without frequent moves.

The energy production needs of each group are different. If you are moving every day or so the main engine(s) generate almost all of the needed power. If you are anchoring for a few days and going back to the dock the occasional generator usage will be efficient and satisfactory.

If you are living on the hook for months at a time and seldom moving more than once a week large battery banks, generators and wind and solar come into play. In this case boaters have also shifted to efficient refrigeration, LED lights, propane stoves etc.

We like others who have commented anchor out for months at a time. Our lighting and refrigeration are very efficient, but we use our water maker, have an on board washing machine and like having hot water available for dishes and showers.

We have a large battery bank,(1300 amp hrs), a diesel generator, a wind generator and two large solar panels. Diesel generator usage is less than an hour a day. Our battery bank rarely, if ever, is below 12.5 volts. While we are efficient in our energy usage we do not skimp.
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Old 08-08-2015, 08:06 AM   #33
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...Also, is there a way to save a thread for future reference? This is a thread I'd like to archive for future reference...
Thanks, and keep it coming!
In the past, when there was something I really wanted to save, I'd email a link to myself. That way, I could always go back to that link and it'll take me right to the thread...without the necessity of a search.

If there are specific points you wanted to save, cut and paste to a word document and save.

You can save the entire thing to a thumb drive and keep it with you or on the boat for instant review.

Just some things that have worked for me in the past.

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Old 08-08-2015, 09:29 AM   #34
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I'm going to build the beach house I've always wanted.

Problem is, I can't decide which beach.

So the beach house has to float. And that forces certain compromises. But electricity is not going to be one of them. (Wife's shoe collection is going to take a hit.)

The floating beach house is going to have 6kw of solar, big alternators (motors) on the engines, and 30-40kwh of LiFePO4 batteries. No gen set. Hopefully solar will suffice most of the time. When it's cloudy, two hours of main engine use will fully charge the batteries.
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Old 08-08-2015, 09:42 AM   #35
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We're normally at a mooring or traveling. Only a few times a year do we have the luxury of being plugged in. Our house bank is 400 ah with separate batteries for starting the engines and gen. Our usage including electric refrigeration is about 100ah a day. Unless its very warm we run the generator any hour or two in the morning and evening to charge batts and heat hot water. We have a gas stove and an inverter for the smaller loads like microwave, toaster and other misc ac items. If its really warm we might run the gen all night so we can have the ac on. When motoring the engines heat water and charge the batteries.

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Old 08-08-2015, 10:04 AM   #36
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..."It's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable"!!!!
GREAT POST! I've felt exactly like this the past few months since I bought my OA but my "guilt"
kept me from writing about it! Most of my friends don't have nearly the comfort on their boats that I have and I'm constantly teased about it. I do have one friend, however, that drives a 2006 OA 64 and he is one of my heroes! What a boat! Everything you can imagine & he and his wife run the whole thing and....THEY ARE REALLY COMFORTABLE!!!
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Old 08-08-2015, 10:59 AM   #37
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GREAT POST! I've felt exactly like this the past few months since I bought my OA but my "guilt"
kept me from writing about it! Most of my friends don't have nearly the comfort on their boats that I have and I'm constantly teased about it. I do have one friend, however, that drives a 2006 OA 64 and he is one of my heroes! What a boat! Everything you can imagine & he and his wife run the whole thing and....THEY ARE REALLY COMFORTABLE!!!
For C-Sake Walt - You and all we boaters have no right to be comfortable with/in/on our cushie power-cruiser floats. By all rights we should be banned to the gallows!

Just cause we worked smart and fn' hard for many, many decades (and are lucky enough to still be alive - some still working) doesn't mean we should get such just rewards... or does it?!?! Personally I believe in the latter - It Sure Does Mean We Deserve Exactly What We Have!!

As long as we didn't rape, pillage and plunder to get here - that is!
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:31 AM   #38
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Our boat was picked by my wife to conform to her comfort needs. The Nova won over a 42 GB, a Hat 43MY and a classic Bertram 44 MY. My pick was the GB; she thought it too spartan in the galley along w/ split twins in the aft stateroom. Everything on our boat runs on electric power, and lots of it!....stove, hot water, ACs, TVs(120) etc.
As soon as we leave the dock the genny runs until we return. There is no guilt on either of us for being cool while under way or at anchor. The gallon an hour is well worth it to have our floating condo comfortable. The systems on board dictate use of the genny unless we start replacing with DC/propane appliances, no AC ,etc.


and that just ain't gonna happen under the admiral's rules!
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:47 AM   #39
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Our boat was picked by my wife to conform to her comfort needs. The Nova won over a 42 GB, a Hat 43MY and a classic Bertram 44 MY. My pick was the GB; she thought it too spartan in the galley along w/ split twins in the aft stateroom. Everything on our boat runs on electric power, and lots of it!....stove, hot water, ACs, TVs(120) etc.
As soon as we leave the dock the genny runs until we return. There is no guilt on either of us for being cool while under way or at anchor. The gallon an hour is well worth it to have our floating condo comfortable. The systems on board dictate use of the genny unless we start replacing with DC/propane appliances, no AC ,etc.


and that just ain't gonna happen under the admiral's rules!
That's $2880 bucks a month for 30 days at $4 per gal and 24 hr gen set service using 1 gal per hour. Few months o' that = lots of ca$h to improve energy usage conditions as well as save a quite a few boat-buck$ years into the future!
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:55 AM   #40
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That's $2880 bucks a month for 30 days at $4 per gal and 24 hr gen set service using 1 gal per hour. Few months o' that = lots of ca$h to improve energy usage conditions as well as save a quite a few boat-buck$ years into the future!
I do not really think about the cost of the generator but...

We run the generator approx 4 hours a day. Ours burns approx .5 gph at 1/2 load and 1.0 gph at full load. We never hit full load so lets say .75gph to be fair.

.75*4 = 3 gallons per day.

A month out anchoring would be what $360. Not a trivial expense but not significant considering all the other things that make up the cost of owning the boat.

Like others, as we have aged we have come to expect more comfort. Thats one of the reasons we upsized from our 28' Cabin Cruiser. I do not for the life of me se any reason to compromise on that comfort or functionality unless there is a driving force necessitating that.

And like others there is zero guilt. So much so that I don't even comprehend what to be guilty for.
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