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Old 05-17-2016, 09:50 AM   #21
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Heat gun is no problem, easy to use as it softens the finish it is easier to scrape off.
Likely better than a liquid stripper., besides being cheaper.
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Old 05-17-2016, 12:01 PM   #22
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Buy a Project Select 14 in one tool for scraping. It has all the angles and curves you'll need for the job.
Unless you like scraping and refinishing, or can hire someone yearly I wouldn't do the traditional finish again. Looks nice for a couple days, but it's always going to be indoor furniture finish on outdoor exposure.
Compare fancy options to Teakguard products. That's what I did after I spent too many hours scraping, melting and sanding. Easy touch up on this product. Research and see what you think.
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Old 05-18-2016, 01:39 AM   #23
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TeakGuard for us.

Dewalt makes a great heat gun for stripping, adjustable temperature and some nice scraping attachments. 1100 degrees works best for that layer you are removing.

Our mess was the same color and thickness, it was Cetol.

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Old 05-18-2016, 04:17 PM   #24
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Can you repair smaller areas versus doing the whole thing at once?
I understand I'd have to put on several coats of Cetol to match the thickness of the original coating,
but I'd rather not have to think about doing everything at once now.
I'm talking about a spot like this:
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:27 PM   #25
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Your Cetol is past done. Time to strip and start over.

You would be wasting your time doing anything else IMO.
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:28 PM   #26
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Greetings,
Mr. WD. Well, the bare wood isn't going to get any better, exposed as it is. It will continue to degrade over time. What you could do is remove the worst of the really loose stuff and give it a quick one or two coats of Cetol to seal it until such time you are going to tackle the whole stretch. I wouldn't bother to try to match the existing coating in color or thickness. Just seal it for now.

When you DO re-finish, keep in mind there will be some color difference that you may never be able to equalize between the bare/weathered pieces and what is currently under your old coating.

Just saw Mr. 11's post and agree, the old finish is past done but I stand by my statement above for a couple of protective coats to protect for the time being as a temporary stopgap.

Oh, and get some very cheap, non silicone caulk or tape on the edge of that hatch @ the 1:00 o'clock position in the photo NOW.
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:49 PM   #27
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Thanks for the replies.
It's not what I wanted to hear, but it is what I expected.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Oh, and get some very cheap, non silicone caulk or tape on the edge of that hatch @ the 1:00 o'clock position in the photo NOW.
Hatch?
Here's a picture showing more of the area in question.
Maybe you mean the "seam/gap" on the edge?


PS:
Hope I'm not hijacking, but it does appear the OP and I are both in the same conundrum, so maybe this will help them as well.
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:53 PM   #28
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Seeing that picture, I bet the old stuff comes off in sheets. You may not even need a heat gun. Just scrape, sand, and redo with cetol.


Edit: You posted the picture above as I was typing my response to #24. Seeing that, it doesn't look quite as bad as I imagined.
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Old 05-18-2016, 05:03 PM   #29
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Varnish has mostly failed on our Fu Hwa. A PO stripped about half the boat to bare Teak. A PO also painted the Teak window trim white and another stripped that just to peek, I suppose. Some of the Teak trim (up under the Euro-hat) was never varnished. Subject to further rumination, I plan to strip and let most of the Teak go grey. I plan to repaint the once-painted trim. I plan to strip and Cetol the two sliding doors and their trim.

Both varnishes and Cetol are susceptible to water creeping under the finish from under poorly-bedded items, failed sealant lines and failed glue joints, and away from poorly bedded edges. There really is no cure for for the resulting lousy appearance but rebedding, resealing, and constant refinishing. (That's why your finish failed along the fiberglass.)

As RTF said, you can gain a little time and stop a little continued color change and wood loss by knocking the loose stuff off, doing a little sanding, and slopping a little finish on. I think you'd be happier if you'd pick a section, preferably with natural end points and do it well. You can 'feather' layers of finish by sanding to hide the transition between new and pretty and the thick old stuff, but it will be obvious.

Teach yourself some tricks like cutting in/edging by hand. Taping takes time. The tape will occasionally peel up your new Cetol if you've been a little slapdash with the thickness overlapping the tape. Tape left on too long leaves a sticky mess that only shows later, when it's collected dirt. Keep your scraper sharp and continually sharpen it. A fine file is good enough. Don't sharpen your steel scraper over your boat, the metal chips will rust and stain your new work. I use the Allway FE1, 1" wide scraper; I've even added a long handle to one for easier control. The 1" width removes a satisfactory amount of varnish with a reasonable amount of force. I use a heat gun, but take great care to not heat the adjacent fiberglass, not always easy. Use a sander where ever possible. I have a Fein MultiMaster and use the plastic hook-n-loop backers (rather than the metal ones with the plastic face). They're expensive and the backers are readily ruined by sanding heat - expensive. Stick with the triangular pads and don't bother with the sharp-pointed ones, they are ruined almost instantly by heat. Fein is no longer exclusive for such tools, shop around.
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Old 05-18-2016, 05:04 PM   #30
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Greetings,
Mr. WD. Yup, seam/gap for sure. The reason I specified very cheap caulk is the old stuff that's barely there will probably be removed when you eventually refinish the cap rail so you really only want to seal the crack temporarily and it would be a waste of $$ to put the pricey stuff on only to scrape it off in a year or two. The cheap stuff will be easier to remove as well.

From the angle of the second picture, the finish doesn't look all that bad. You may be able to sand and coat only those bare areas BUT plan on a total re-do in the future.
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