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Old 08-26-2012, 08:47 PM   #1
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What is the farthest anyone has taken their trawler?

Been thinking about cruising down to south america from seattle... Anyone ever done a big trip like this? Any routes to avoid?
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Old 08-26-2012, 08:52 PM   #2
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No, but taking two years for the one-way voyage would be wise.
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Old 08-26-2012, 08:52 PM   #3
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I dunno about 2 years... I was thinking 9 months. Any opinions on why 2 years?
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Old 08-26-2012, 09:07 PM   #4
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Are you in a race or do you want to enjoy the ports/cultures and pick your weather windows on the voyage?
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Old 08-26-2012, 09:14 PM   #5
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No race... Just want to be safe lol. Would you stay close to shore or hit the deep open seas?
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Old 08-26-2012, 09:35 PM   #6
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Depends. What are the particulars of your boat?
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Old 08-26-2012, 09:43 PM   #7
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Single lehman open flybridge;however i am thinking about fully enclosing the fly.
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Old 08-26-2012, 11:07 PM   #8
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We're 700 miles into a 2,000 mile run from SC to Lake Powell. But you meant on the water didn't you?

Shown here just after crossing (over) the Mississippi.
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Old 08-26-2012, 11:12 PM   #9
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We were debating hauling her to the gulf of mexico...
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Old 08-26-2012, 11:18 PM   #10
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Glenn...I bought my boat in San Francisco and cruised it up to Vancouver. You definitely want to pick weather windows going down the West Coast. We went in July. For about a third of the trip we had 25-35knot steady winds. There are a few points to go around....Point Reyes, Point Arena and Cape Mendocino. Cape Mendocino for example has very interesting underwater topography, strong local currents, prevalent wind and gets a lot of fog during the year. When we crossed this cape, we had large beam seas so decided to try and take refuge in Ft. Bragg. After about 20 minutes of surfing down large swell, we opted to continue to slog towards the cape. We knew once we crossed the cape, things would settle down....you could actually see it in the distance.

Another problem with the West coast is that most ports are on river bars and can be dangerous or impassable, depending on the tide and wind. So if you are stuck in bad weather, you may need to ride it out. So the key is definitely picking favorable weather windows and port hopping or making longer runs if the weather permits.

As for distance we were probably 6-20 miles offshore as you want to be in deeper water. Closer to shore can be a minefield of traps. Also, at certain points you will be wanting to transit a straight line. The California coast curves inward. We did the trip in 8 days. Could have been six, but got held up in Port Garibaldi Oregon with some technical issues. We also stayed one night and refueled in Eureka, CA.

Anyways, that is all I can tell you......but there is still a lot of boating south of San Francisco to get to the canal. Would be a fantastic trip, but take your time, be safe and enjoy.
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Old 08-26-2012, 11:23 PM   #11
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Thats the response i was looking for! Thanks bud yes weather and tides will be all planned in advance and will not rush the seas once we are
On them. Refuge maybe our only choice depending on what the weather does.
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Old 08-27-2012, 06:12 AM   #12
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With basically an inshore boat you would do best to avoid genuine heavy weather offshore.

Your boat would not like even one comber crashing on deck or sweeping from stem to stern.

"Ocean Passages for the World " is the book you need to plan a route.

Here is one of just 20 (on average) weather systems that occur during June to Nov in the pacific:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-19384371

Or what about the Caribbean:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-19386362

It can be done , but not quickly as some weather windows may be seasons apart.
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Old 08-27-2012, 07:41 AM   #13
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Been thinking about cruising down to south america from seattle... Anyone ever done a big trip like this? Any routes to avoid?
We left Seattle in 2008 and are in Trinidad now. Make lots of stops along the way is all we can suggest and don't rush. You can pretty much day hop all the way down. The only route to avoid would be the coast of Venezuela. Right now it's unsafe due to piracy. The outer islands are fine but it's a heck of slog to weather with contrary current. Columbia is great particularly if you speak some Spanish.

Some people will say to stay out of Mexico. IMHO it is still one of the best cruising areas. It's a good place to see if the cruising life style fits you/the admiral. You also still have easy access to the US. You can be as remote as you want or if like to stay in US type marinas, you can.
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Old 08-27-2012, 07:46 AM   #14
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With basically an inshore boat you would do best to avoid genuine heavy weather offshore...
With any boat, you would do best avoid genuine heavy weather offshore.
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Old 08-27-2012, 10:48 AM   #15
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We left Seattle in 2008 and are in Trinidad now. Make lots of stops along the way is all we can suggest and don't rush. You can pretty much day hop all the way down. The only route to avoid would be the coast of Venezuela. Right now it's unsafe due to piracy. The outer islands are fine but it's a heck of slog to weather with contrary current. Columbia is great particularly if you speak some Spanish.

Some people will say to stay out of Mexico. IMHO it is still one of the best cruising areas. It's a good place to see if the cruising life style fits you/the admiral. You also still have easy access to the US. You can be as remote as you want or if like to stay in US type marinas, you can.
In making your voyage, what is the farthest you've needed to go between fuel stops? My boat carries 440 gallons of fuel. I am comfortable with 400-500 NM right now, and could possibly stretch that a bit by throttling back some. Is that enough range?

Thanks!
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Old 08-27-2012, 11:34 AM   #16
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I have 300 and previous owner says 1.5 an hour at 2000rpm. I have not gone on a trip far enough to measure. I will be going to port angeles on sept 22 and will try then to see.
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Old 08-27-2012, 11:56 AM   #17
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I have 300 and previous owner says 1.5 an hour at 2000rpm. I have not gone on a trip far enough to measure. I will be going to port angeles on sept 22 and will try then to see.
I think you previous owner was like mine.....

If you have a 120 or 135 Lehman...I would expect quite a bit over 2.0 gal/hr.

My 135 chart (which I have right in front of me) says almost 3 gal/hr and I know that to be trus as I ran the boat to NJ from Ft Lauderdales at around 8 knots (2000-2200) as the PO said 8 knot cruise and I was getting very poor milage compared to what I thought. After some fuel ups I knew that the consumption was 3-4 gal/hr. So my chart is in lockstep with my engine...and a 120 can't be that much different.

Here's another guys experience and I would say he's high on the curve (poor eng performance maybe?)

34' marine trader 1973 120hp ford lehman 2.3-2.6gph at 8 mph @1650 rpm


Here's another close to my curve...

1978 49 DeFever RPH 68,000lbs wet, twin 120 lehmans nap, @1700 rpm 7.3 kts fuel burn 4 gal/hr

He's close to my chart at 2gal/hr at 1700 RPM, my chart for the 135 says he should be slight;y under 2.0 gal/hr per engine
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Old 08-27-2012, 12:03 PM   #18
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I think it is all how you drive them... I like the way she feels in the water at 15-1800 rpms and from the sound of the engine i dont see it burning a whole lot of fuel. Regardless i give her 900 nm on full tanks...
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Old 08-27-2012, 12:07 PM   #19
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In making your voyage, what is the farthest you've needed to go between fuel stops? My boat carries 440 gallons of fuel. I am comfortable with 400-500 NM right now, and could possibly stretch that a bit by throttling back some. Is that enough range?

Thanks!
400-500 miles between fuel stops wouldn't be a problem. San Diego to Turtle Bay, MX to Cabo San Lucas. Those would be the 2 longest stretches in MX. Then no problem all the way to Panama. After Panama on the Caribbean side it's not a problem with some planning. Capt. Pat Rains has a cruising guide for this area that was just updated:

Captains Pat & John Rains
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Old 08-27-2012, 12:15 PM   #20
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