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Old 09-11-2016, 03:14 PM   #81
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Another side question. Those of you who do all the work on your boat yourself, what about on your cars? And on your house systems?
Having retired from the auto industry, I have more tools than most. I also drive a 2016 Ram 2500 that will go to the dealer for maintenance! I do still maintain our 1972 Fiat 500 however as it is so cute that I can't resist playing with it! As for our home, I will do small plumbing and electrical jobs but when it comes to building things, we call the contractor who built our house.
We just added a new outdoor fireplace, this one we paid for!

Bruce
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Old 09-11-2016, 03:17 PM   #82
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Same applies to my house and cars...if I have the time, skills, tools, knowledge and abilities, I'll attampt to tackle the job. At home, that's not normally an issue. On the cars, it's becoming more of a problem with electronic controls and all.
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Old 09-11-2016, 03:55 PM   #83
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Another side question. Those of you who do all the work on your boat yourself, what about on your cars? And on your house systems?

Cars, no.

Home, depends... but usually if it's something I've learned how to fix on the boat, the knowledge is transferable, and I have the tools... maybe. In that case, ideally deferrable until winter.

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Old 09-11-2016, 04:16 PM   #84
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Having retired from the auto industry, I have more tools than most. I also drive a 2016 Ram 2500 that will go to the dealer for maintenance! I do still maintain our 1972 Fiat 500 however as it is so cute that I can't resist playing with it! As for our home, I will do small plumbing and electrical jobs but when it comes to building things, we call the contractor who built our house.
We just added a new outdoor fireplace, this one we paid for!

Bruce
Nice looking design and masonry construction O/D FP. If smoke keeps darkening the stone just above firebox... I recommend raising the chimney. Hope the damper was installed correctly into the smoke shelf and throat to the flue - probably was - the masonry work looks very professional. If problem of blackened upper front stone persists you could add a smoke shield at top of FP firebox opening, therefore reducing the height of opening. Of course make sure there is no obstruction just over the damper in the path to smoke chamber (some times during building pieces of material get lodged there that can constrict airflow (get to top of chimney and look down with spot light). Keep damper well opened. Another smoke-stain stopper is to elevate the interior hearth area where bottom of wood rests via metal grates. This helps to get the heat of the actual burning wood and its licking flames closer to point of exit up the chimney; therefore creates a better/faster exhaust draft.

BTW - I've designed and had my masonry/concrete/tile construction company build hundreds of FPs and chimneys... along with many other types of structures - commercial and residential.

Cheers! Anyone for hotdogs and marshmallows?? - Art

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Old 09-11-2016, 04:25 PM   #85
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Wifey B: That's nice looking. Don't think I can exactly justify one where we live though.
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Old 09-11-2016, 04:28 PM   #86
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Nice looking design and masonry construction O/D FP. If smoke keeps darkening the stone just above firebox... I recommend raising the chimney. Hope the damper was installed correctly into the smoke shelf and throat to the flue - probably was - the masonry work looks very professional. If problem of blackened upper front stone persists you could add a smoke shield at top of FP firebox opening, therefore reducing the height of opening. Of course make sure there is no obstruction just over the damper in the path to smoke chamber (some times during building pieces of material get lodged there that can constrict airflow (get to top of chimney and look down with spot light). Keep damper well opened. Another smoke-stain stopper is to elevate the interior hearth area where bottom of wood rests via metal grates. This helps to get the heat of the actual burning wood and its licking flames closer to point of exit up the chimney; therefore creates a better/faster exhaust draft.

BTW - I've designed and had my masonry/concrete/tile construction company build hundreds of FPs and chimneys... along with many other types of structures - commercial and residential.

Cheers! Anyone for hotdogs and marshmallows?? - Art

Funny you should note that...
We have already gone up 2' and put a cap on the fireplace.
It has had a very big influence on how well the fire burns as my lay mans observation is that it increased draft tremendously.
As it gets colder I will look at it more critically...
I may ask for advice as we move forward.
By the way, the mason who built this is a very accomplished craftsman. We did build to the dimensions of an architect however...
Most of the black is left over from the shorter stack.
Many thanks for your input!
Bruce
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Old 09-11-2016, 04:35 PM   #87
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Wifey B: That's nice looking. Don't think I can exactly justify one where we live though.
Life is simply full of compromises!
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Old 09-11-2016, 04:38 PM   #88
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Another side question. Those of you who do all the work on your boat yourself, what about on your cars? And on your house systems?
Do some work on my house and some on my truck. Far easier to get service people to come fix those two, as neither of those are going to break between Florida and the Bahamas.

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Old 09-11-2016, 04:46 PM   #89
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House similar to boat...
Enjoy building things
Woodworking easy & have tools & a well equipped shop.
Barter some...hauling & tree trimming for canvas work.
I have worked w contractors. ..did a complete gut job kitchen remodel w 5 days w/o sink etc... admiral still wanted to know why it took sooooo long?????

Car another story...farm most out as harder to crawl under...wish I had an oil xchg sysyem under the hood.
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Old 09-11-2016, 07:54 PM   #90
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Another side question. Those of you who do all the work on your boat yourself, what about on your cars? And on your house systems?
I do everything on the house but roofing and floor refinishing. I do routine maintenance on the vehicles, unless it's one I'm restoring.

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Old 09-11-2016, 08:02 PM   #91
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Here's our Fiat...
I do everything there is to do to keep it moving!
Bruce
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Old 09-11-2016, 08:06 PM   #92
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Here's our Fiat...
I do everything there is to do to keep it moving!
Bruce
Wifey B: Does it run on pumpkins?
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Old 09-11-2016, 08:07 PM   #93
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unless it's one I'm restoring.
Sweet ride
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Old 09-11-2016, 08:12 PM   #94
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Wifey B: Does it run on pumpkins?
2 cylinder 18 horse power!
The most fun I've ever had on 4 wheels...
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:23 PM   #95
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Here's our Fiat...
I do everything there is to do to keep it moving!
Bruce
By pointing it downhill?
I well remember the old Fiat 500, and the decadent 600. In Italy you still occasionally see one, well challenged, in hill towns. Some Polish company revived the 500 here, presumably elsewhere too, but it didn`t take on, except for its cuteness.
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:30 PM   #96
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Funny you should note that...
We have already gone up 2' and put a cap on the fireplace.
It has had a very big influence on how well the fire burns as my lay mans observation is that it increased draft tremendously.
As it gets colder I will look at it more critically...
I may ask for advice as we move forward.
By the way, the mason who built this is a very accomplished craftsman. We did build to the dimensions of an architect however...
Most of the black is left over from the shorter stack.
Many thanks for your input!
Bruce
Hi Bruce

Being a decades accomplished designer and builder of many masonry projects (as well as numerous fireplaces and chimneys) I notice just about everything regarding building accomplishments and their functionality qualities.

Feel free to PM me with any questions or suggestions you might like to review. Phone chat is fine too.

Happy O/D FP Daze! - Art
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:12 AM   #97
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Late responses...

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Even though you could put in those same hours on the job and make many times what you were paying? Or is it that you still prefer washing the boat to working?
The fallacy of that argument is that time spent working on the boat doesn't take away from my time spent working. The nature of a private practice is that I can't take a day off to work on the boat and I can't decide to work a Saturday to earn more. Too many moving parts of which I am simply the biggest cog.

But yes. I enjoy washing the boat more than I enjoy a lot of things.

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Catholic?
Protestant. Presbyterian to be exact. Life would have been easier if I had been raised Lutheran. Those folks really understand the nature of "grace".

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Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Another side question. Those of you who do all the work on your boat yourself, what about on your cars? And on your house systems?
I repair what I can, although that is getting more difficult with the increasing electronics in automobiles. Definitely do my own routine maintenance such as fluids, tires, etc...

I just got back from Annapolis this weekend. I flew out there to attend a memorial service for my Uncle (completely unrelated to 9/11). In chatting with his 4 boys we realized that both our fathers instilled in us the same attitudes about doing things yourself. The only difference is that my uncle went through a series of sailboats, many purchased new. I would never be able to bring myself to buy a new boat and have only purchased a new car three times in my life, 2 for my wife and one for the business, and I am still feeling a bit decadent for doing so.

However, I had a nice lunch yesterday overlooking the water in Annapolis and it was fun looking at boats and noting some differences and similarities from the PNW.
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:57 AM   #98
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I could argue to not to try to do all, but do the stuff that you can do better and will save you time and money.

Simple things like changing oil/filters/batteries, etc., are often done faster than calling someone to do it. Even the big batteries. I've often jumped in to help a buddy with them and can get two installed in no time.

I really like to hire out what I call grunt work. Work that doesn't necessarily take a lot of skill and you can get people to do it cheap... like cleaning the boat, detailing, mowing the yard, etc.

I like to do skilled stuff that I've learned to do well that's expensive to farm out and often have to wait for services to be done. Especially things that require taking the boat to someone. I've got things set up where I can pull the drives if needed, able to replace a sea cock or thru hull item, or a bow thruster. All of those get very time consuming when taken to the boat yard.

I will hire someone to replace starters, as they are a bitch to get to, below and at the rear of the engine, but have done it.

Now, I could argue that if one does not do their own maintenance, they should take the time to know how, or at least the basics to be sure things are done to their satisfaction.

Usually the mechanics are fine, but seen some cases where neither the mechanic or boat owner knew what was going on and ended up ugly.
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