Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-09-2016, 07:11 PM   #61
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,141
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
We could do many of the critical things if forced to and if it was beyond our knowledge we'd have someone quickly on a cam to tell us what to do. However, we have gotten training in the primary things that can shut you down. The head, we understand and have the manuals but not something we've practiced doing.
That's certainly a good plan. But what about spare parts? Most of your break downs will require parts. Now I'm sure you have a manufacture's "frequently replaced parts kit" for every piece of equipment on the boat. But there are parts to have that aren't part of the piece of equipment.

As an example:
Most all of your electrical circuit protection are likely circuit breakers. But I haven't seen a boat that didn't have some large fuses. Your house battery bank is protected by one most likely. There are scenarios where that fuse can fail or blow (two different things). Somebody may be able to help you find the problem and resolve it. Without a replacement fuse in spares department, the power still isn't restored. So, do you have atleast one spare fuse for every in service fuse? Do you know where these different fuses are? Do you have a VOM (Volt Ohm Meter) to test the fuse?

I'm certainly not going to able to fix everything that could break on my boat. But there is almost nothing on my boat plumbing, electrical, electronic, and mechanical that I haven't been through. So I know what spares to have.

Second example:
I replaced the 3 air conditioners on my boat during my refit. I'm infinitely familiar with the wiring and the plumbing. So I have a spare seawater pump to replace the one in service should it fail. I have spare hose clamps for those hoses. I have the thread sealant and tools to switch the hose adapters to the new pump. I have a spare circuit breaker for the panel in case one goes bad. My spares are based on my installation experience. As I installed them, I noted which items would be good to have spares of. To me, that is one of the huge side benefits too doing much of my maintenance, knowing where stuff is and what spares to have.

Ted
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 07:52 PM   #62
Senior Member
 
nemier's Avatar


 
City: North Vancouver
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: INFINITY ∞
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 62
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 176
We basically do everything we can, including dry-dock work, engine repair, and waxing. I'll happily pay a professional once, to learn how to do something I have no experience with. Knowing how to fix stuff is part of ocean voyaging. Some days I do get sick of 'learning' though, but count ourselves fortunate to be in this position.
__________________

__________________
Andy & Julie Nemier
N62 INFINITY ∞
www.n62infinity.com
nemier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 09:11 PM   #63
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 9,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
My hobbies do not include fixing things.
Nor mine.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 11:46 PM   #64
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: Gibsons, B.C.
Country: Canada
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,500
Pay:
Bottom painting and truly major bottom work, coming up this spring. Learned years ago that storage charges eat up so called DIY savings if boat sits too long awaiting my pace especially when weather will not co operate. Some jobs just best done pro.

Do:
waxing include hull.
Varnish
Oil changes
Minor frp works
Hoses, belts ,
Larger version alternator including mod. for external reg., And install reg.
Anchor windlass re ,re. ,
Then new anchor windlass install
Window and frame re.re after being hit
Engine valves and injector .adjust
R. w. Pump re.re
Battery replace and electrical mods.
Gear cooler clean,test, and all new hydraulic hoses.
Minor woodworking
Electronics install, nothing fancy here.
All electrical adds and repairs.
Much welding when I had access to good machines, now gone.
Lots of other stuff plus help some friends from time to time.

To be fair the boat is now my only real hobby and the other stuff is boat oriented.
I was an electrician and millwright (millwrong).
C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 07:01 AM   #65
Guru
 
ranger42c's Avatar
 
City: Maryland
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 42' Sportfish
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,498
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
That might be an adjunct question and that is "If money was a complete non-issue (which it never is), what work would you still do on your boat as opposed to paying for it?"

Ah. The famous "hypothetical." Now we're into "lottery boats" too.

My answer is that I'd only do the planning, management, testing and evaluation afterwards... and ideally some hands-off learning about how to actually do the work during the technician's process.

In the meantime, I couldn't afford to be boating if I didn't do a significant portion of the work myself.

Although there's a certain amount of intellectual satisfaction when I successfully -- eventually -- fix something that I didn't know how to fix when I started. Latter is usually the case. Nothing in my professional career prepared me for doing any of this kind of work... so when intellect successfully triumphs over broken system, I'm usually pleased. Usually even when I'm sore and bleeding afterwards... also not uncommon...

Learning the jargon is usually Job #1. It seems every system from every technical field has decided which words they want to use to describe things. I never "already" know that stuff; always have to translate everything or learn the relevant lexicon...


Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
When my boat breaks, I need to be able to fix it. There are a lot of places where getting repairs done or a tow isn't going to be simple.

And then there's that. Back to that learning thing.

-Chris
__________________
South River, Chesapeake Bay
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 07:57 AM   #66
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: East Greenwich Yacht Club, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bella
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,315
The original poster's question has resulted in dozens of answers ranging from "I do everything myself" to "I write big checks to the yard/mechanic".

I think that the more interesting question would be- "what does it take to do more of the work yourself." So, let me try to answer that one.

First it takes a boat owner with an innate mechanical aptitude. Not necessary skill, because that is learned, but a real interest in things mechanical.


If you start with that personal trait then the how to can be learned. I use boatdiesel and I have learned a lot there about how to maintain my diesel.

Another is financial. Some are quite willing to write checks to support their hobby. Others like me are fundamentally frugal and hate to pay someone who will do no diagnostic thinking and will just change parts until he stumbles on the solution.

The other thing necessary is time- wanting to spend the time that you have working on your boat rather than something else. I get a real sense of satisfaction for having solved a problem correctly, particularly if I didn't know how to do it in advance and got some help from boatdiesel to point me in the right direction. So the time spent working on my boat is part of my recreation.

But I do respect the alternate way of doing things- put your boat in the hands of the yard and enjoy the time out on the water, not turning wrenches.

David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 08:01 AM   #67
Guru
 
Bruce B's Avatar
 
City: RI
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 925
I have great need to understand how things work. I always have, since I was a little kid...
I made my living in the repair and maintenance of European autos and in fact boating was simply a way to exercise my passion in a slightly different venue from work.
I literally prowl the boat looking for things that are "wrong" so that I have something to do. I shorten maintenance intervals because the truth is I simply love the work!

On a secondary level, I have a mild distrust of boatyards.
I've hired out a number of jobs that were outside my skill set and more than once I've been left "holding the bag".
I have learned that I am capable of most any boatyard task if I take enough time. That is the big difference, I don't have to earn my living painting a bottom, I can take the time I need to get it right. I can read to my hearts content, speak to the tech departments at will and plan all I want. My work speed would get me fired but the results always get lots of ooh's and aaaah's.

Let me finish with this more positive story.
I have also had extraordinarily good results with repairs made in boat yards! I find that if I am clear about my expectations and I monitor the work (notice I did not say micro-manage or hover...) I can get the results I am looking for.
We had an incredible experience at Wayfarer Marine years ago when we hit a rock while cruising in Maine. That job was so well handled it should be a case study for any boatyard looking to improve their image. I remember explaining to the then manager that I was looking for more than 100%. I explained that although most people would credit a 95% grade as an A, I would be all over them for the final 5%. I even explained that I would become the biggest a$$%0!# they had ever seen if it did not meet my expectations...
The manager looked at me and explained... "Bruce, I've worked for much bigger a$$%0!'s than you, we can do this and we want to do this..."
They blew me away! The repairs exceeded my expectations, they were on time and on budget.
I humbly admit that I'd have never been able to do what they performed.
It was just an incredible experience.
Bruce
__________________
American Tug 395, hull number 12, being built!
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 11:12 AM   #68
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 9,894
There are really two elements. What one can afford and what one enjoys or is skilled at.

While I make no claim to a great mechanical aptitude, I fully believe I could learn to repair nearly everything on my boat. I just don't care to. It's not something I would enjoy, but rather something I would hate doing. I enjoy many things in the world and mechanical work, carpentry, fiberglass work are not among any of those things. I envy those of you who have the skills and enjoy it. I applaud each of you who can do this things and enjoys doing them. We have a couple we're very close to and he is skilled at anything mechanical, electrical, plumbing or carpentry. He loves it too. She is skilled at growing anything, the envy of every neighbor and she loves that. She's also one of the best cooks there is. They amaze me and I respect them so.

Now, on the other hand, I do have one very valuable skill, the ability to select good vendors, in this case boatyards, and manage their work and performance. I haven't had bad experiences like so many of you report. When at home, I use one yard exclusively and have a great relationship with them.

Now, an observation I'll make on the demographics of this forum vs other segments of the boating world. I think in general people here love all aspects of their boats and owning them. Most here do enjoy working on the boat, much like sailboaters, which many were before. Many sailboaters and many here like working on the boats as much as the boating.

Then there's that special group that loves restoring. I've seen similar elsewhere. Those who buy old Chris Craft and perhaps the group that surprises me most is the Post group. They spend years restoring one and even then don't go boating, just get another to restore. They love it and though I can't relate to it, I do see it and am happy for them.

Now other segments do very little work themselves. Living on the lake, I saw very few people who worked on their boats. They didn't have the time or knowledge. Time to do the work is something more common to members of this forum than to them. They owned smaller boats and if something was wrong they took them to the dealer. No different than the way most people do with their cars which the majority of people take their cars to mechanics.

Then at the other end you have the owners of larger boats who typically have no interest in doing their own work and wouldn't have any idea how.

To me it's an interesting subject with no right or wrong, just differences. I read here what many of you do to your boats and your knowledge of those things and I'm very impressed. Just not where my interests lie. I've learned just what I felt I needed to in order to get home safely and to insure things are in good working order. Just no optional or voluntary work for me.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 12:01 PM   #69
Senior Member
 
Islanddreamer's Avatar
 
City: Kingsville, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Ride
Vessel Model: Albin 36 D/C Hull 46 Dec 1978
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 172
We do everything we can until we're in over our head, then pay for help. This site and others online provide a lot of insight for things I'd probably not attempt without knowledge. Ladders and tight places seem to be my limits.
__________________
Any day aboard is a good day.
Islanddreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 12:49 PM   #70
Guru
 
Northern Spy's Avatar
 
City: Powell River, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Northern Spy
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 26
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,496
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post



That might be an adjunct question and that is "If money was a complete non-issue (which it never is), what work would you still do on your boat as opposed to paying for it?"

If this is like a lottery question...Before I had the dream house built and the dream boat bought, I would purchase or build a warehouse or hanger and fill it with all sorts of toys, broken toys, equipment and tools. A wonderful place full of vintage and non vintage cars, trucks, motorcycles, airplanes, boats, farm equipment, pretty much anything.

Of course, I would then have to hire people to help me work on and play with all of my toys.

Irony.
Northern Spy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 12:58 PM   #71
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,015
I look at unnecessary material items in life basically as play toys. Most are not at all actually needed... especially "pleasure" boats! However - I do "need" a boat in my life - LOL!!


That said: Although I am blessed with an engineers mind-bent and love to get my mind n' hands into creating or fixing/restoring/modifying/new-building things... I often keep my toys just in good enough shape as the needs may be for consistent use. I don't keep my toys up with lipstick applied for others to ogle. I do keep my toys up in good condition for my family to safely and enjoyably utilize.


There's an old adage: The cleanest your boat (or car) will most likely ever be is the day you sell her!


PS: In relation to this Thread's premise. I can and likely will do almost every needed general item on a boat that may be required. But - for really big projects like motor rebuild / trany rebuild... etc - I shop that out. Also, don't mind hiring new bottom paint by a yard; although done that too plenty of times.
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 10:11 PM   #72
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
I find it interesting how many of you enjoy working on your boats. I know many are retired with limited budgets but I know others are working and in professions where they could go work two hours and pay for eight hours of labor on their boat. I know people with the same love of it. We know a couple with a Viking that is in perfect condition and they just look for things to do to it. It's like people with Classic cars and you get concerned some are going to wax their car to death.



That might be an adjunct question and that is "If money was a complete non-issue (which it never is), what work would you still do on your boat as opposed to paying for it?"

Good observation. I enjoy doing a lot of things. Simple stuff such as changing oil and filters is something that I get satisfaction from.

Other things, If I could afford it, I would gladly never do. I like rinsing the boat off after I get to the dock, I hate cleaning the boat and would love to pay someone to do it monthly. OK, to be honest I could pay to have someone wash the boat monthly, but I could never deal with the guilt. I had it ingrained in me by my depression era father to never pay someone to do what you can do yourself. Any time I do pay someone to do something that I know I could do myself (such polish and wax) It creates a crisis of conscience that takes weeks to recover from.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 10:43 PM   #73
Veteran Member
 
saltcod's Avatar
 
City: Campbell River
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Selkie
Vessel Model: Canoe Cove 41
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 84
I/We have done everything ourselves since getting the boat in 2014 except freeing a stuck main engine seacock. I took a propane torch to it with no success. The boatyard guy had a pinpoint torch that allowed him to break it free in seconds. I've done oil and fuel filter changes, installed a complete new electronics suite including radar, serviced generator, installed new raw water impellers, new fuel gauges and senders oil pressure gauges and senders, low pressure alarms, Fridge, complete scrape, sand and repaint bottom. ( I won't do that again, a $1000 well spent) Installed second holding tank and pump for front head, new alternators, macerator toilet pump and I'm sure more...
saltcod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 10:46 PM   #74
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 9,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
I hate cleaning the boat and would love to pay someone to do it monthly. OK, to be honest I could pay to have someone wash the boat monthly, but I could never deal with the guilt. I had it ingrained in me by my depression era father to never pay someone to do what you can do yourself. Any time I do pay someone to do something that I know I could do myself (such polish and wax) It creates a crisis of conscience that takes weeks to recover from.
Even though you could put in those same hours on the job and make many times what you were paying? Or is it that you still prefer washing the boat to working?
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 10:49 PM   #75
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Good observation. I enjoy doing a lot of things. Simple stuff such as changing oil and filters is something that I get satisfaction from.

Other things, If I could afford it, I would gladly never do. I like rinsing the boat off after I get to the dock, I hate cleaning the boat and would love to pay someone to do it monthly. OK, to be honest I could pay to have someone wash the boat monthly, but I could never deal with the guilt. I had it ingrained in me by my depression era father to never pay someone to do what you can do yourself. Any time I do pay someone to do something that I know I could do myself (such polish and wax) It creates a crisis of conscience that takes weeks to recover from.
Catholic?
menzies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 10:58 PM   #76
Veteran Member
 
saltcod's Avatar
 
City: Campbell River
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Selkie
Vessel Model: Canoe Cove 41
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 84
Ah yes, the depression era father, and mother too. My Dad built 6 houses so he could pay for ours much sooner. When he built a house, he would build all the cabinets, counter tops, installed oak floors, did everything... and I wasn't born until after he did all that. My mom cooked everything we ate. Baked all our bread. There was never a processed food in our house. She grew a garden, canned tomatoes, beets. Saved carrots, potatoes. Amazing people
saltcod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 11:29 PM   #77
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Any time I do pay someone to do something that I know I could do myself (such polish and wax) It creates a crisis of conscience that takes weeks to recover from.
That's why I don't pay someone to wax my boat. (OK, that...and because I'm cheap!) Just say "NO!!!" to wax!

Someone needs a hug!

Quote:
Originally Posted by saltcod View Post
I've done oil and fuel filter changes, installed a complete new electronics suite including radar, serviced generator, installed new raw water impellers, new fuel gauges and senders oil pressure gauges and senders, low pressure alarms, Fridge, complete scrape, sand and repaint bottom. ( I won't do that again, a $1000 well spent) Installed second holding tank and pump for front head, new alternators, macerator toilet pump and I'm sure more...
You obviously really know your boat! Goodonya!!
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2016, 05:09 AM   #78
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Even though you could put in those same hours on the job and make many times what you were paying? Or is it that you still prefer washing the boat to working?
As someone who is retiring in 1.5 months, it's definitely the latter for me. Something about the worst day boating exceeding the best day in the office . . .
angus99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2016, 12:00 PM   #79
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by angus99 View Post
As someone who is retiring in 1.5 months...
Congrats, Angus! You're gonna love it!
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2016, 01:12 PM   #80
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 9,894
Another side question. Those of you who do all the work on your boat yourself, what about on your cars? And on your house systems?
__________________

BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012