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Old 09-26-2015, 01:44 PM   #1
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What Dinghy engine should I buy?

Looking to replace my Yamaha 8 hp engine. Looking at 9.9 - max 15 hp.
What is your suggestions and why?
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Old 09-26-2015, 01:54 PM   #2
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Is your Yamaha a 2 stroke? If so, I think you'll be amazed at the added weight difference if you end up with a 4 stroke. What dinghy would the new engine be going on?
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Old 09-26-2015, 02:08 PM   #3
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I'm with Larry, more background info please.
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Old 09-26-2015, 02:26 PM   #4
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AB dinghy 11feet. Yamaha 2 stroke 60 lbs. My concern is the increased weight of a 4 stroke making the 9.9 hp not much faster than my 8 hp and a 15 being to heavy to lift?
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Old 09-26-2015, 02:44 PM   #5
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You probably won't see any significantly better performance with a 4 stroke 10 hp over your two stroke 8 hp. Some 10s and 15s share the same block, so there is no weight difference.

I would look for the lightest 15 hp 4 stroke I can find. Get a flat pitch prop to make it easier to get up on plane.

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Old 09-26-2015, 02:49 PM   #6
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Advice for anyone switching from two stroke to four stroke. If your wife/woman is going to cruise with you make sure she can pull start the four stroke you are planning to buy.

Things have changed recently but a number of friends dumped four strokes after they found their wife couldn't start the engine.
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Old 09-26-2015, 03:18 PM   #7
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In preparation for our cruise, I recently found out the 4 strokes cannot handle the lesser quality/dirty out of country fuel. Apparently they have smaller jets, etc. Just a thought depending on your cruising itinerary.

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Old 09-26-2015, 03:29 PM   #8
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Go to the Bahamas and purchase a new 2 stroke there.
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Old 09-26-2015, 03:59 PM   #9
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Why not call AB and find out what they recommend for your exact model (they've made a number of 11'ish boats). New York
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:31 PM   #10
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Go to the Bahamas and purchase a new 2 stroke there.


As far as starting, my Admiral is already on the edge with a 9.9 two stroke Merc. Four stroke, no way. Plus, with a 9 ft. Caribe, the four-stroke really squats. One of our Krogen friends traded their new four-stroke 9.9 Merc for a used two-stroke 9.9 Merc for that reason. If I have to go with a four-stroke, for Island cruising it may as well be a 15 cuz it's the same weight and a 15 does help down there with long distance anchorages.

For loop cruising, I'm looking at Lehr propane units.....probably a 2 HP for dinghy jogging and maybe a 9.9 or 15 for a get-home.
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:35 PM   #11
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I saw the words pull start. I have to advise that no one over 50 should be pull starting any engine. It's the worst motion you can do for your heart. I know people do it all the time, but cardiologists warn against it. Oh, I might add that my father's fatal heart attacks came from pull starting a leaf mulcher.
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:55 PM   #12
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I saw the words pull start. I have to advise that no one over 50 should be pull starting any engine. It's the worst motion you can do for your heart. I know people do it all the time, but cardiologists warn against it. Oh, I might add that my father's fatal heart attacks came from pull starting a leaf mulcher.
That allegation or warning has come up before on this forum and maybe others, but I still have never seen any documentation or studies that substantiate that pull-starting is a particular cardiac risk. It seems to me that if that were really the case, every company that makes lawn mowers to chain saws to power washers to snowblowers to outboard motors would be getting their pants sued off in this litigious society. Strenuous, sure, even triggers heart attacks, sure, but where does this idea come from that pulling a starting cord poses a cardiac risk greater than any other vigorous exertion? (Somewhere I read that snow shoveling was the most deadly exertion statistically, but now I can't find it.)
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:07 PM   #13
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That allegation or warning has come up before on this forum and maybe others, but I still have never seen any documentation or studies that substantiate that pull-starting is a particular cardiac risk. It seems to me that if that were really the case, every company that makes lawn mowers to chain saws to power washers to snowblowers to outboard motors would be getting their pants sued off in this litigious society. Strenuous, sure, even triggers heart attacks, sure, but where does this idea come from that pulling a starting cord poses a cardiac risk greater than any other vigorous exertion? (Somewhere I read that snow shoveling was the most deadly exertion statistically, but now I can't find it.)
I can't prove it. I have heard it from enough cardiologists to believe it. Everyone makes their choice and in this case will have to make it based on their personal belief. Still, i issue that warning and readily admit it's all anecdotal, not proven through research or trials. Would the person who has a heart attack cranking something manually or the person shoveling snow have had their heart attack anyway? They might well have. I can't say. As to lawn mowers there are so many other injuries and dangers that keep people going to emergency rooms without having heart attacks.

I personally feel that exerting oneself cranking an engine manually is a risk I wouldn't take over electric. I think the issues do probably come from hard to start and people not knowing when to give up or stop.
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:24 PM   #14
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Some good points on here. We switched from a 2 stroke 15hp Johnson (it was stolen) to a 20 hp 4 stroke Suzuki. They were on a 10' Caribe Light.

The 15 hp and 20 HP Zukis weigh the exact same, so I saw no reason to go with the 15.

The 2 stroke was faster out of the hole, easier to start, and faster at tope end than the 20hp. Plus the dinghy squatted with the 4 stroke.

I ended up trading our 10' dinghy for an 11' Caribe Light to compensate for the heavier motor. It's worked pretty well, plus the extra space is nice.

Sure do miss my 2 stroke though.

So at 50 years old, I'm more likely to have a heart attack starting my outboard than sprinting the last 200 meters of a 5K like I did this morning?
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:37 PM   #15
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Sailkane,
Is your engine going to stay on the dink?
If not weight will be your deciding factor. Air cooled OB engines are very noisy. My 2hp Yamadog is tollerable to half throttle but very noisy at 3/4. Air cooled are even more noise but quite a few people here on TF think they are OK. Try one. Two stroke and you don't need to worry about how you lay them down.
My wife loved our old 6hp Johnson. Took the dink everywhere by herself.
With a four stroke OB one needs a longer boat to support the weight and I do'nt even want to consider carrying a 4S OB over 5hp.
The old two strokes are still the best small OB .......IMO.
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Old 09-26-2015, 07:41 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by kthoennes View Post
That allegation or warning has come up before on this forum and maybe others, but I still have never seen any documentation or studies that substantiate that pull-starting is a particular cardiac risk. It seems to me that if that were really the case, every company that makes lawn mowers to chain saws to power washers to snowblowers to outboard motors would be getting their pants sued off in this litigious society. Strenuous, sure, even triggers heart attacks, sure, but where does this idea come from that pulling a starting cord poses a cardiac risk greater than any other vigorous exertion? (Somewhere I read that snow shoveling was the most deadly exertion statistically, but now I can't find it.)
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I can't prove it. I have heard it from enough cardiologists to believe it. Everyone makes their choice and in this case will have to make it based on their personal belief. Still, i issue that warning and readily admit it's all anecdotal, not proven through research or trials. Would the person who has a heart attack cranking something manually or the person shoveling snow have had their heart attack anyway? They might well have. I can't say. As to lawn mowers there are so many other injuries and dangers that keep people going to emergency rooms without having heart attacks.

I personally feel that exerting oneself cranking an engine manually is a risk I wouldn't take over electric. I think the issues do probably come from hard to start and people not knowing when to give up or stop.
Not wanting to promote thread drift... but since this has come up a couple times recently... thought I'd weigh in.

With over 30 years of field experience in emergency services, and having personally treated literally hundreds of "full arrests" in that time, I have seen no correlation to pull starters - be they on OB, mowers, chainsaws or blowers. That said, I have seen some codes that did occur during/after exertion (jogging, golfing, and even... sex) and would make the assumptive leap that the cardiac event could have been triggered by that exertion. Codes during or after physical exertion were definitely in the minority, vs many other activities - or frankly no activity. However, I am sure that Mr. BandB's heartfelt warning after the loss of his father is well intentioned.

My background is much stronger in physiology then kinesiology... and in both cases, would still defer to those much more knowledgeable than I as to whether there is any causative link between pull starters and a cardiac event. Personally, even in my 50's, I'm more worried about further injuring my worn out shoulder than a cardiac event from yanking on that cord. Irregardless, there is some wisdom in both posts - namely that pulling on a start cord for any motor could quickly become both strenuous and stressful, depending on the circumstances. I highlighted a section above from Mr. BandB which pretty much says the same thing. If you need to go big... pony up for electric start and don't risk hurting yourself or worse.
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Old 09-26-2015, 07:52 PM   #17
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Not wanting to promote thread drift... but since this has come up a couple times recently... thought I'd weigh in.

With over 30 years of field experience in emergency services, and having personally treated literally hundreds of "full arrests" in that time, I have seen no correlation to pull starters - be they on OB, mowers, chainsaws or blowers. That said, I have seen some codes that did occur during/after exertion (jogging, golfing, and even... sex) and would make the assumptive leap that the cardiac event could have been triggered by that exertion. Codes during or after physical exertion were definitely in the minority, vs many other activities - or frankly no activity. However, I am sure that Mr. BandB's heartfelt warning after the loss of his father is well intentioned.

My background is much stronger in physiology then kinesiology... and in both cases, would still defer to those much more knowledgeable than I as to whether there is any causative link between pull starters and a cardiac event. Personally, even in my 50's, I'm more worried about further injuring my worn out shoulder than a cardiac event from yanking on that cord. Irregardless, there is some wisdom in both posts - namely that pulling on a start cord for any motor could quickly become both strenuous and stressful, depending on the circumstances. I highlighted a section above from Mr. BandB which pretty much says the same thing. If you need to go big... pony up for electric start and don't risk hurting yourself or worse.
All you've said makes a lot of sense. It's one of those "given a choice, which would I choose". Personally if it's going to be exertion, I'd choose sex over the others you mention. Now the open question is does the OP leave it on the boat or remove it. Handling and lifting is the bigger issue if removing it.
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Old 09-26-2015, 08:47 PM   #18
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Back to the original question, you might look at the Tohatsu 9.8. Its weighs around 80 lbs and you can hardly hear it when it is running. You can buy one from:

Outboard Motors |Tohatsu, Suzuki, Mercury & Nissan Outboards for about $1900.

If you go 15 hp or above, I'd get a Suzuki electric start as it is fuel injected - no carburetor. That what I'm looking at for my current 10 ft Avon.
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Old 09-26-2015, 09:36 PM   #19
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The 15 hp Suzuki EFI can be manual start at 96 lbs. First pull engergizes the ECM and the engine starts on 2nd pull after sitting all winter. The admiral uses it most for Shore Dooty (name of dinghy) w/ our Lab so she got to pick electric or not - chose not (easier to lift w/ davits). On year 3 on 9.5 AB Lammina and it moves out with all 3 of us. When we sell this boat she's already told me they won't get her tender...

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Old 09-26-2015, 10:59 PM   #20
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The problem of squating can be corrected with the addition of fixed trim tabs.

The Lehr propane fueled 9.9 and 15 are available with a small battery under the hood to turn the electric starter. The 15 also has an automatic compression release that makes it easier to manually start.
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