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Old 07-24-2019, 06:33 PM   #1
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water heating on a Ranger Tug R-27

We are i the process of purchasing a 2016 R-27 and will hopefully pick it up by mid August.
My question is how is the water heated on the boat? 12v, engine water?
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Old 07-26-2019, 05:52 AM   #2
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We are i the process of purchasing a 2016 R-27 and will hopefully pick it up by mid August.
My question is how is the water heated on the boat? 12v, engine water?

Congrats Bill. I suggest you join the site Tug Nuts.

Your diesel engine will probably have a return line plumbed into your hot water tank that will heat the water in the tank. This is very convenient for when you're running the boat.

When you're at the dock your shore power (AC side NOT 12V) will power your hot water heater. It takes a lot of power to run a hot water heater.
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Old 07-26-2019, 12:54 PM   #3
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Most trawlers I have seen do not hook up the engine's coolant system to the water heater. So it only heats with 120V power.

It isn't that difficult to hook it up. Most engines have a supply tap and a return tap for this purpose. Get the right fittings (Yanmar 4LH and 6LYs are weird Japan spec threads) and hook it up with heater hose.

Then the engine coolant will heat the water up as the engine runs.

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Old 07-26-2019, 01:19 PM   #4
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Most trawlers I have seen do not hook up the engine's coolant system to the water heater. So it only heats with 120V power.

It isn't that difficult to hook it up. Most engines have a supply tap and a return tap for this purpose. Get the right fittings (Yanmar 4LH and 6LYs are weird Japan spec threads) and hook it up with heater hose.

Then the engine coolant will heat the water up as the engine runs.

David
Oh, I thought it was common. My old Camano 31 came that way.
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Old 07-26-2019, 01:28 PM   #5
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Oh, I thought it was common. My old Camano 31 came that way.


I thought it was common as well. Both my last two sailboats (Catalinas) were setup that way as well as my current North Pacific. I think that is standard for NP Yachts. Very convenient. After running for the day we have hot water for showers and washing dishes in the evening or morning.
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Old 07-26-2019, 01:30 PM   #6
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Hmmm, I canít recall one that was not hooked up if it was otherwise ready, I mean itís just two pieces of hose.
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Old 07-26-2019, 01:36 PM   #7
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I'll have to check out the boat next month when I can drive up to WA.
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Old 07-26-2019, 02:03 PM   #8
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I thought it was common as well. Both my last two sailboats (Catalinas) were setup that way as well as my current North Pacific. I think that is standard for NP Yachts. Very convenient. After running for the day we have hot water for showers and washing dishes in the evening or morning.
I'm happy to say our NT is also set up that way and has a radiator type heater in the saloon. You must be careful, The shower gets extremely hot.
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Old 07-26-2019, 02:14 PM   #9
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It’s an interesting question especially now that the 2019’s are outboard powered only.

But for your model the original answer is correct. Like many stay aboard boats in that class the hot water tank is heated by a closed loop coolant line from the inboard engine, and then also by electric coil for 120v service - which could be provided by the optional generator on larger Ranger models if present or by shore power or a portable generator on the 27.
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Old 07-26-2019, 02:44 PM   #10
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I much prefer the IB diesel to having a 300 HP OB hanging off the stern.
The appearance also looks weird also.
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Old 07-26-2019, 02:45 PM   #11
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Welcome aboard. Congrats on your new boat. I have found that most boats have the water heater heat exchanger hooked up to one of the engines. It gives you hot water while underway and usually will stay hot overnight. When you are plugged into shore power your 120 volt hookup will power the water heater. 12 volt water heating would run your batteries down in short order.
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Old 07-26-2019, 06:05 PM   #12
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I much prefer the IB diesel to having a 300 HP OB hanging off the stern.
The appearance also looks weird also.
I agree. Very disappointing that itís not just an option apparently.

On the other hand some of the claims that Ranger Tugs is making about the performance of the model are impressive including most efficient cruise velocity.
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Old 07-26-2019, 06:19 PM   #13
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And a diesel is safer than gasoline; my thought.
A leak into the bilge with diesel does not have the same explosive potential.
I think the balance and center of gravity is shifted too far aft,
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Old 07-26-2019, 06:33 PM   #14
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I’ve spent much of my adult life driving boats from skiff to 50 something in length and I can tell you I’ve never owned an outboard boat except for a skiff and have never been in love with using outboards for work with one important exception: situations where beaching or purposely maneuvering through extremely shallow water or shallow obstacles is necessary. If I was in the Everglades or on Lake Powell I’d only have an outboard-equipped trailerable boat.

Well, and it’s much easier to change a dinged prop on one lol.

I’m also in the market. My wife and I are still negotiating over procuring a live-aboard class trawler, vs something that is smaller and trailerable to be towed behind a land yacht instead as we jump into full-timing around North America in the next year or so. A Ranger 27 is at the top of my list for option two.
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Old 07-26-2019, 06:40 PM   #15
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As a Coast Guard Auxiliary member while on patrol, we use a surplus Utah sate park Boston Whaler Challenger 25 with twin Yamaha 225 HP 2- strokers.
The boat sits stern heavy.
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Old 07-26-2019, 07:04 PM   #16
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If you have a genie aboard it's best to use it frequently as there are more gen problems caused by under / improper use.
I use the water heater to add some load as shore batty chargers are a minimal load. Will sometime run AC just to load the gen. If no gen available it's a very different story.
IMO
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Old 07-26-2019, 07:15 PM   #17
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No genny aboard.
Water heater usage sounds like good advice.
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Old 07-26-2019, 08:04 PM   #18
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As a Coast Guard Auxiliary member while on patrol, we use a surplus Utah sate park Boston Whaler Challenger 25 with twin Yamaha 225 HP 2- strokers.
The boat sits stern heavy.
Lake Powell or somewhere closer to the valley?
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Old 07-26-2019, 08:14 PM   #19
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Bear Lake in Rich County; lake is in both Idaho and Utah.
Beautiful 8 x 20 lake.
Thanks
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Old 08-15-2019, 10:00 AM   #20
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I have an R-27 (classic) and bought it specifically for towing around the country. You'll need a 3/4 ton truck if going any distance. And yes the engine is plumbed to the water heater and provides cabin heat too.

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