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Old 07-16-2016, 09:28 PM   #1
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Ventilation

Do you run the blower all the time with a diesel I have a 48 krogen.
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Old 07-16-2016, 09:53 PM   #2
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Nope. Only when we drop anchor on our 42 GB with Detroit 453's. That's to help the cabin a.c. keep things cool. Don't use it at all when underway.
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Old 07-16-2016, 10:07 PM   #3
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We use the engine compartment's ventilation fan when entering the compartment after running the engine. Nevertheless, it's still quite warm in there. I don't view the fan as a necessity as the heat doesn't enter living spaces.
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Old 07-16-2016, 11:20 PM   #4
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We run it all the time in our GB 32.
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Old 07-16-2016, 11:24 PM   #5
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When the L120s are running.
It`s not a fume/safety issue, it`s for cooling, gets a lot hotter in there without using the exhaust fan which is mounted one side of the hull below vents, with reciprocal vents on the other side.
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Old 07-16-2016, 11:29 PM   #6
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I don't have any ER ventilation other than the built-in (large) vents. Nothing blown, as not needed for safety in a diesel, like it is with petrol (what you call gas) engines.
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Old 07-17-2016, 05:21 AM   #7
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Depends on the boat design. For instance my Hatteras had a DC blower that vented the battery area(s) which the manual said to run when below ('cruising speed"). The duct inlet was low, along the battery boxes. It also had a set of AC blowers, mounted high along the ER ceiling, which were designed for cooling the ER for working in it, or evacuating the CO2 if the fire system had tripped. BTW, each engine was in its own room with 6'4" headroom.

A diesel engine is one big "blower" in and of itself.
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Old 07-17-2016, 05:52 PM   #8
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Run mine whenever the engine is running and uo to a half hour after shutdown. Reduces engine room temperature, battery temp, fuel temp, cabin temp above engine room, and keep any smell from coming out of the engine room when I open the hatch to do a check while underway. Have one 220 cfm blower. Consider it important enough that I have a spare.

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Old 07-17-2016, 06:12 PM   #9
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On a diesel boat the primary use of an engine room blower is to exhaust heat during heat soak after shut down. When underway, Itf the air intake area is minimal, you can actually spin the blower backwards due to the pressure drop in the engine room. Many electronics such as inverters do not like to be exposed to high heat. . The blower is there to protect that equipment
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Old 07-17-2016, 06:24 PM   #10
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My boat with twin Perkins 4.236's doesn't have ER blowers/fans. Not needed.
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Old 07-17-2016, 06:51 PM   #11
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Well cked the temp it was 91 going in the vent and 123 coming out that was with blower on for 3 hrs that we were running
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Old 07-17-2016, 06:59 PM   #12
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After we get in we turn on the blower and run it till the engine room gets down to 90 degrees. Today, that might mean we run it till midnight. Bloody hot here on the Chesapeake today.
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Old 07-18-2016, 12:52 PM   #13
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Interesting information. I have typically not run the blower on my boat. My thought was that the engine's air intake is providing a lot more air exchange than the blower does anyway. However, maybe I am wrong on that. The other issue is getting rid of the heat after shut down, something I hadn't though of either.

I have some very long runs ahead of me over the next week (12hours or so). I suppose that with the heat buildup in the fuel tanks (that flank the ER) as well as the heat soaking of the ER from a very long run, every little bit of venting could help?
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Old 07-18-2016, 03:51 PM   #14
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You probably have a fuel cooler so that the build up in the fuel temp will not be that critical. At low rpm the blower might removes some heat but at high RPM it could actually reduce the performance by increasing the engine room air depression which makes harder for the engine to get combustion air. Best to let the engine be the fan underway and let the blower manage waste heat when you stop.
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Old 07-18-2016, 04:13 PM   #15
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uh oh.
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Old 07-18-2016, 04:26 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tadhana View Post
You probably have a fuel cooler so that the build up in the fuel temp will not be that critical. At low rpm the blower might removes some heat but at high RPM it could actually reduce the performance by increasing the engine room air depression which makes harder for the engine to get combustion air. Best to let the engine be the fan underway and let the blower manage waste heat when you stop.
There are a lot of us with modern engines that don't have fuel coolers. Properly sized engine room air intakes pose no problem for adequate air flow for both engine and exhaust blowers. Reduced combustion air temperature is beneficial to engine performance and fuel economy. Best to consult the boat builder regarding using the ventilation underway, some specify it. After all they were the ones who designed and built the space.

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Old 07-18-2016, 04:46 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tadhana View Post
You probably have a fuel cooler so that the build up in the fuel temp will not be that critical. At low rpm the blower might removes some heat but at high RPM it could actually reduce the performance by increasing the engine room air depression which makes harder for the engine to get combustion air. Best to let the engine be the fan underway and let the blower manage waste heat when you stop.
Good points. I think you have a 330hp Cummins 5.9l QSB? I have the 380hp version. There is a fuel cooler on my engine, and given this application, it is likely to be completely unnecessary. Since it is there, I probably won't see much fuel temp increase over time.

Not sure about the air pressure issue, I don't think the blower has that much capacity and the air intakes into the ER seem to be plenty large.

Turning on the blower after engine shut down makes sense. Of course that means that I have to remember to turn it off as well.

I would love to find a 12v timer switch that could be toggle on and then shut itself off after 30 minutes. I can think of a couple uses for that.
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Old 07-18-2016, 05:01 PM   #18
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I would love to find a 12v timer switch that could be toggle on and then shut itself off after 30 minutes. I can think of a couple uses for that.
Intermatic spring wound timers Time range from minutes to hours.

Buy the commercial grade (FF). The Decorator grade (FD) is price point junk.

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Old 07-18-2016, 05:21 PM   #19
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Dave, I figured your boat probably had a Cummins and she is of about the same vintage as ours with QSB 5.9 230. I ran a well known boat yard and we were a Cummins servicing dealer. Engine room depression is more common than people realize. A diesel consumes a lot of air. If you are going to put a timer on the engine room fan, it probably needs to be set for hours, not minutes. Granted your ambient air and water are cooler than ours (83 degree water right now). To get our engine room below 100 degrees we often have to run the fan for 4-6 hours in the summer time. In the winter with 45 degree water we don't run it much at all.
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Old 07-18-2016, 05:39 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Many electronics such as inverters do not like to be exposed to high heat. . The blower is there to protect that equipment
We have a fan and duct that blows outside air on the inverter/charger. It is controlled by a thermostat set to come on at 95F. It runs most of the time while cruising, and usually for a couple of hours after shutdown, depending on outside temperature.
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