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Old 02-21-2014, 01:17 PM   #21
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Thanks...
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Old 02-21-2014, 01:45 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Tad Roberts View Post
The numbers I have on the Swan Song (Roughwater 54) flume tank designed by Don Bass of Saint Johns, Newfoundland.

Tank dimensions, 12' long, 4' wide, 16" high. Five "T" shaped baffles 18" from either end. Tank weight 250 pounds, 1550 pounds of water, approximately 6.5" full.......

Yup that it!

It was original sold as 58 Roughwater offshore Trawler.



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Old 02-21-2014, 01:46 PM   #23
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Almost 2000 pounds in the superstructure eliminates a lot of trawler sizes most of us have....
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Old 02-21-2014, 02:16 PM   #24
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Almost 2000 pounds in the superstructure eliminates a lot of trawler sizes most of us have....
That tank (and any others properly designed) was carefully tuned to the size and roll character of the particular boat. Smaller boat = smaller tank....less weight required as rolling energy is lower.
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Old 02-21-2014, 03:34 PM   #25
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That tank (and any others properly designed) was carefully tuned to the size and roll character of the particular boat. Smaller boat = smaller tank....less weight required as rolling energy is lower.
I know...but Smaller boat = smaller tank only to a point...every boat would have to be measured and a specific tank for every model...unless plain old overkill design is used and then I'm sure weight would be still an issue for a lot of production boats...especially fiberglass ones and even more so Taiwan T's that just have a skin of glass over some barely structural plywood.

And then I guess adjustment must be made on long cruises for consumable consumption?...and where they are stored?

If I really thought it would be pretty easy and practical...I definitely would pursue one.
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Old 02-23-2014, 05:02 PM   #26
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I was thinking on a smaller boat you could experiment with lengths of PVC pipe, say 8".....First try two, then three, etc. Make the baffles (about 18" from the ends) of wood or plastic, glued in or screw fasten from the outside (goop the holes). Cut pipe to length and cap the ends so they fit inside the flying bridge. Chock them they can't move, glue a small (say 1") nipple in the top and half fill (or more) with water. Drill a vent in that filler pipe.

Go find some chop and lay sideways in it.......

Actually the rolling of smallish (35'-40') cruisers, especially those with hard chines, will (I believe) be too fast to work well with a flume tank. The tank did work (it's subjective) on Swan Song because it's a larger boat with a slow rolling period.
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Old 02-23-2014, 05:10 PM   #27
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I was thinking on a smaller boat you could experiment with lengths of PVC pipe, say 8".....First try two, then three, etc. Make the baffles (about 18" from the ends) of wood or plastic, glued in or screw fasten from the outside (goop the holes). Cut pipe to length and cap the ends so they fit inside the flying bridge. Chock them they can't move, glue a small (say 1") nipple in the top and half fill (or more) with water. Drill a vent in that filler pipe.

Go find some chop and lay sideways in it.......

Actually the rolling of smallish (35'-40') cruisers, especially those with hard chines, will (I believe) be too fast to work well with a flume tank. The tank did work (it's subjective) on Swan Song because it's a larger boat with a slow rolling period.
Thanks...I was thinking the same about my 34 LWL/40 footer with hard chines...not sure what will help...

But this has got me thinking...I need some weight aft and could use a long step up onto the after house...maybe a "U" shaped tank around the back of the after house and partly forward along the sides may help...not worried about structure there...but not very high either.

If you saw the rot in my interior teak ply...you'd be scared of adding weight to the flybridge too!!!
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Old 02-23-2014, 05:15 PM   #28
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Not sure if this applies or helps, some modern racing sailboats have water tanks either side and pump the water to the weather side tank as ballast, reversing the procedure with each upwind tack. I assume downwind they equalize. Some have canting bulb fin keels used to similar effect.
Requires running an engine 24/7,which somehow defeats the purpose. Canting keels have been known to get stuck.
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Old 02-23-2014, 05:25 PM   #29
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In the floor of the vee berth is a water tank. I don't know what is used for because I have water tanks for house water. Could it be it used for ballast?
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:50 PM   #30
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ballast and anti-rolling are two different animals....one is usually permanent or at least a tank and its weight stays in one place...anti-rolling is just that..it moves to counter rolling...much faster than a sailboat uses to offset heeling...

that's about as simple as I can explain it...
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Old 02-24-2014, 11:41 PM   #31
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You could make the tubes much smaller if you filled them with lead shot instead of water.

Tad as our resident boat designer, have you ever heard of using trim tabs on the back of a boat as anti-roll devices? I know on my small planning boat the tabs can make it lean to one side or the other pretty quick. Trim tabs are less prone to damage than wing type stabilizers and a lot cheaper and easier to install.
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Old 02-25-2014, 05:29 AM   #32
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Trim tabs have been used for roll control but like fins, they work best at higher speeds and at higher speeds the typical recreational hull doesn't roll much anyway.

I have thought about using active "interceptors" as they can provide a fair amount of lift at speed with less drag than fins or tabs.
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