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Old 04-13-2013, 02:14 PM   #41
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Good shots Walt!
I grew up in the interior of BC and bear encounters were frequent. When I returned to Nelson BC for a few years with my Aussie wife, she was a little concerned regarding bears. I reassured her that they are nothing to worry about. Several hours after we arrived we had 3 grizzlies in our back yard (a sow and 2 yearling cubs). It turned out the former tenants of the house cleaned out their fridge and left it in a bin outside in the hot sun. A grizzly will smell this from miles away.
Just don't do anything stupid like this and they tend to keep their distance. I've never felt the need for a gun or a noisemaker to scare off bears; just be aware of your surroundings and don't carry fish or other food with you.
It's the cougars I worried about. You rarely see them, but they see you.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:24 PM   #42
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We're at the other end of the extreme and choose to avoid seasonal bear habitat.
Well, you're smart! I won't soon repeat that trip although I'm going back to Angoon,AK in late July, fishing.

Don't let anyone tell you that bears won't hurt you if you just treat them with respect. Like humans, there are some mentally disturbed bears out there that don't need an excuse to attack and all the people yelling "GO BEAR" and blowing horns are not going to stop them. Also, a head shot is the only place to really stop them in their tracks as it interrupts all their motor responses. They can still run a long way with a chest shot (heart) before bleeding out and collapsing.

I'll bet that a good number of you have seen the video of a SoCal crazy man by the name of Timothy Treadwell. Treadwell saw himself as the savior of the Alaska grizzly bear. I've posted a photo of him when he met up with a bear that did not want to be saved.

Googling Timothy Treadwell is a good education on the Alaskan Brown Bear & Grizzly. (Same species but lives in the interior.)

https://www.google.com/search?q=timo...w=1067&bih=522
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:36 PM   #43
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Don't carry food? to a grizzly you are food.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:42 PM   #44
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We have left our boats at anchor for days at a time, and in the U.S. have had no problems. In our marina, gated and with security cameras, we have been broken into twice. However, in caribbean waters, there are a few reports of vandalism and theft at anchor. We lock our hatches and passageways, but have never seen any evidence of people boarding when we are away.
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Old 04-13-2013, 04:16 PM   #45
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We were attacked overnighting at the lock just beyond Lake Oneida on the Erie Canal going west. Some locals decided to climb on board and help themselves to whatever was in our coolers and lying about the flybridge. It wasn't fun. I first thought my wife was up walking around - she thought I was up walking around - reality hit us both at the same time. I flipped the spreader lights on and grabbed the diving knife and a nightstick and went outside to do battle. My wife got a frying pan and gave my 11 year old daughter a sauce pan and they guarded the door. Once I yelled the hoodlums jumped ship and ran into the nearby woods. I heard a car race out of the park. Nights were never quite the same after that.

I took a page from Joshua Slocum and booby trapped the boat most nights out after that. I tied trip lines all over using extra dock lines and some flag halyards. If we were at a lock, I used a kedge anchor off the side to pull us out away from the dock. If I had tacks I would have used them too. We made a plan and that helped calm everyone down. We had no further problems that summer.

Well one problem. Docked at the pavilion on Dow's Lake, we were boarded by a raccoon. He never knew what hit 'em.

In Quebec on the Chambly system, a GB 42 we were docked with had two very expensive folding bicycles stolen right off their aft deck one night. We were not attacked. So I guess that is another way to defend yourself - travel with more expensive boats with more glittering prizes.
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Old 04-13-2013, 04:54 PM   #46
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Don't let anyone tell you that bears won't hurt you if you just treat them with respect. Like humans, there are some mentally disturbed bears out there that don't need an excuse to attack and all the people yelling "GO BEAR" and blowing horns are not going to stop them. Also, a head shot is the only place to really stop them in their tracks as it interrupts all their motor responses. They can still run a long way with a chest shot (heart) before bleeding out and collapsing.
When I was in the USAF in Alaska a friend of mine hired a guide to take him on a bear hunt on Kodiak Island. He bought a 460 Weatherby a year prior and shot hundreds of rounds through it until he felt competent with the gun. He and a third friend flew to Kodiak, with the friend along to run the video camera.

They did a sneak on a grizzly and got to within about 75 yards of it when the guide told him to take the first shot. He did, striking the bear right in the heart. The bear flopped down then got right back up. Another shot to the heart put him down but he again got right back up. The bear didn't know where they were yet but he was looking for them.

Third, fourth and fifth shots were fired before the bear finally stayed down. After they skinned the bear they found that all shots were right into the heart area and that the heart and surrounding organs were destroyed.

I don't know how many times we watched that movie, but every time we watched it we found things we hadn't seen prior. It sure showed how tough those big ol Kodiak bears are to kill.
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Old 04-13-2013, 06:46 PM   #47
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With regard to stopping a charging bear we were taught by the AK fish and game people to aim not at the head because the massive bone slanting back in the top of their skull can deflect the round. Instead aim at their chest and keep firing until the gun is empty. The objective is not to hit te heart. The objective is to break down the muscles in their chest that help operate their forelegs. The objective is not to kill the bear but to stop it.

This is why the only truly effective weapon to stop a charging bear at short range is a 12 gauge shotgun loaded alternately with slugs and buckshot. This is why we carry a shotgun with a full-length magazine. Capacity is seven shells..

A charging bear is so hopped up on adrenaline that a hit that would normally kill it may not even phase it for the moment. And if the bear can reach you, even if it's dying, it can take you apart. That's why stopping it before it can reach you is critical and at short range only the shotgun has enough shock to do it.

I've had to do this once myself (this before we learned about the horns) and have been present when a companion had to do it. The method we were taught works. Both times the bear collapsed onto its chest before it got to us. They did not die immediately but they were rendered relatively immobile even though they kept kicking themselves toward us with their hind legs.

Not a pleasant experience and one we hope never to have to repeat. That's why we were so taken with the horn idea. Far better to warn them off long before you get near them.
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Old 04-13-2013, 08:27 PM   #48
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I find I just to need outrun the slowest person I'm with
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Old 04-13-2013, 08:36 PM   #49
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When I was in the USAF in Alaska a friend of mine hired a guide to take him on a bear hunt on Kodiak Island. He bought a 460 Weatherby a year prior and shot hundreds of rounds through it until he felt competent with the gun.

They did a sneak on a grizzly and got to within about 75 yards of it when the guide told him to take the first shot. He did, striking the bear right in the heart. The bear flopped down then got right back up. Another shot to the heart put him down but he again got right back up. The bear didn't know where they were yet but he was looking for them.

Third, fourth and fifth shots were fired before the bear finally stayed down. After they skinned the bear they found that all shots were right into the heart area and that the heart and surrounding organs were destroyed.
I've heard and read similar stories about trying to put a bear down with a 300+ Weatherby. Yes, you can kill a bear with a .22 if you're extremely lucky but if you don't want to wind up as bear scat, carry a large caliber rifle! My experience in Alaska has been with a sporterized Enfield 30-06. The guides considered it to be on the small end of recommended calibers (for Brownies) but it was a gun I felt really comfortable with & I could shoot it quite accurately.

Head shot! Knock out the bear's ability to charge. Hell, at close range, with a scope, that's a sizable target!
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Old 04-13-2013, 08:53 PM   #50
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A slug from a 3" 12-gauge has about 90% of the kinetic energy at the muzzle as a bullet from a 460 Weatherby Magnum elephant/buffalo gun (2400 versus 2600+ foot pounds), but it sheds energy a lot faster (the slug is fatter and shorter than the magnum's bullet). So, the Weatherby would be a better hunting tool as shots would normally be 75, 100 or more yards away. Nevertheless, I would choose the 12-gauge in a defensive role as the range will be shorter although I'd want one with sights rather than just a bead.
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Old 04-13-2013, 09:03 PM   #51
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I have a switch within easy reach of the aft stateroom bed that when activated sounds a very loud alarm through a siren located on our radar arch. The siren is also connected in parallel to a high water bilge switch.
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Old 04-13-2013, 09:07 PM   #52
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Nevertheless, I would choose the 12-gauge in a defensive role as the range will be short although I'd want one with sights rather than just a bead.
When I was 15 years old, we use to hunt big farm fed White Tails in New York State. (200-210 lbs.) You could only hunt with shot guns and rifle slugs. Bob Martin, who owned the Sinclair gas station, hunted with a scope mounted 20 Ga. and slugs. He was quite proficient at 150 yards and it seemed that every year he got his buck.
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