Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-12-2016, 10:14 AM   #1
Member
 
Bob Hudspeth's Avatar
 
City: Pacific Northwest (Washington)
Country: USA
Vessel Name: North Sea
Vessel Model: Rawson
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 23
Using a tidal grid for hull inspection

Up here In The Pacific Northwest we have tides that allow for a tidal grid to be used at some marinas for hull inspections and minor maintenance in place of lifts and their associated costs. No bottom cleaning or painting allowed. I have a need to do one minute check-up of a zincs that I am slightly concerned about due to my zinc conditions last year that were way bad by the end of the season.

My question is whether or not anyone has ever used one, and if so was it worth the effort to save the money.

Another question is weather or not anyone has just let the tide go out on a smooth shallow bottom to do a quick look?
__________________
Advertisement

Bob Hudspeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 11:10 AM   #2
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,904
Here's Willy on the grid in Thorne Bay Alaska where we lived for 8 years. Sure wish there was one down here in Washington State.


The best grids are high enough so one dos'nt need to lay in the muck to access the hull. The grid in Thorne Bay is. Most of the old grids (everywhere in SE) are wood and closer to the bottom. So work may have to be done on your knees.

One needs to place the hull very carefully on the grid beams so as to put the force of the weight in places that will not damage the hull. I had assumed Willy's keel was straight and the grid beams are. It was slightly curved. When the tide went out the first time 90% of Willy's weight was borne at one spot about in the middle of the keel .. all 8 tons in one spot. The Willard boat suffered not at all but if she had been an old wood boat I'd have been pounding wedges under the keel in two places further out to take some of the weight.

Ideally one would ballast the boat so she listed a bit toward the dock or pilings. I think all grids are sloped so you probably be stuck tying off to one side. Willy had a very slight list to port so was ideal w/o ballast. You can let her settle on her keel a few inches away from the pilings and pull her over w mooring lines. Or just hope your lines, cleats, decks ect are strong enough to take the strain on an outboard list.

Timing is an issue. Many times I had to come down to the grid in the middle of the night and in AK in the winter it was not pleasant w rain/snow and a little flashlight. You need to be there the moment the tide puts your boat on the grid and the moment she floats. Damage and danger to one's self are real. I would always be on board well before the moment of floating or grounding and things happen quickly. Especially grounding or settling on the grid beams. You think the boat will lean and settle on this piling and in fact another piling contacts first as the boat is slight yawing at the moment when it all happens. One should have extra lines ready for surprises but almost always all goes well.

Time to work on the boat doing what needs to be done is frequently an issue too. We had big Alaska tides that was very beneficial but sometimes the right tide time is in the middle of the night. The hardware store is closed and you may not have time to go get tools ect. Don't drop your keys in the muck or fall down in it either. A lot can go wrong but almost always all goes well especially if you plan well.

Bob you say you're from Eatonville. Very few people will know where that is. Indicating what state or country Eatonville is in frequently is helpful while posting and shouldn't be a security risk to anyone. The content of our posts is frequently relevant to where one lives.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	all to 12-15-09 396 copy 4.jpg
Views:	57
Size:	196.5 KB
ID:	54154  
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 11:36 AM   #3
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Bob you say you're from Eatonville. Very few people will know where that is. Indicating what state or country Eatonville is in frequently is helpful while posting and shouldn't be a security risk to anyone. The content of our posts is frequently relevant to where one lives.
Eatonville, named after the Van Eaton family if I recall. Small town in rural western WA in the shadow of Mt Rainier.

Tidal grids are great Bob but they are getting harder to find. I am still upset that my Yacht Club decided to let their tidal grid deteriorate. I think it was largely for two reasons. EPA regs that prohibited bottom work such as sanding, painting, cleaning ect... and concerns about liability.

A tidal grid would be great for small things such as zinc replacement and inspection. As was pointed out, you do have to be careful. But if we could do it with sailboats with fin keels, a trawler hull should be a piece of cake. The trick is finding one.

If you just want your zincs inspeccted etc... I would recommend a dive service. It isn't all that expensive and they will clean your hull, inspect and replace your zincs, and you don't have to haul your boat to do it. I have a diver clean my hull every 3 months.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 11:37 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Max Simmons's Avatar
 
City: Everett, WA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 38'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 493
Are there tidal grids in Washington anymore? I seem to remember one over on Hat Island as a kid. Guys would haul ass to get the bottom painted before the tide came in.
Max Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 11:57 AM   #5
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,904
The last grid I remember was in lower Eby Slough st Marysville WA. I's long gone now.

No I don't know of any in WA. Many in BC though and all over in SE AK.

Too many people.

Thank you Max for listing your state. I'm not pick'in on Bob. I'm pick'in on everybody that lists little towns or cities that many or most wo'nt have a clue where they are. You don't know if the person's fron Alabama or Albainia. I think when you registar you should be required to list state or country.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 11:58 AM   #6
Veteran Member
 
City: North Vancouver
Country: Canada
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34 Sundeck
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 48
We use the tidal grid at our club and find that it is a relatively easy process, though I would find someone familiar with their use the first time you put your boat on it.

The savings for getting the zincs changed is substantial. The only real concern I had was making sure we did not end up with prop shafts on the bunks, but we relied on the sling marks and it went perfectly. Surprisingly easy.
LowNSlow77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:05 PM   #7
Member
 
Bob Hudspeth's Avatar
 
City: Pacific Northwest (Washington)
Country: USA
Vessel Name: North Sea
Vessel Model: Rawson
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 23
Thanks for the information. The Port of Poulsbo operates a grid. It costs $50.00 for non-tenants. It sounds l like it may be something I want to try. If nothing else, it is another tool in the tool box.
Bob Hudspeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:07 PM   #8
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Hudspeth View Post
Thanks for the information. The Port of Poulsbo operates a grid. It costs $50.00 for non-tenants. It sounds l like it may be something I want to try. If nothing else, it is another tool in the tool box.
Good to know. Poulsbo ia a nice place to go for a weekend anyway. Compare the $50 to the cost of a diver though. When you factor in time and a small amount of risk, the diver might be a good option.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:09 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mattkab's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma
Country: USA
Vessel Name: C:\[ESC]
Vessel Model: 1983 Fu Hwa Seahorse
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 230
Send a message via Skype™ to mattkab
I'd love to use a tidal grid, but I've gone the scuba route. Scrape my prop and running gear once a year, and check zincs twice a year. Makes me keep my gear in working order and inspected, and saves a ton of money - $6 for a fill and I can be under for over an hour (at 4-5')
__________________
Thanks,
Matt B.
http://mvcesc.wordpress.com/
mattkab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:11 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mattkab's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma
Country: USA
Vessel Name: C:\[ESC]
Vessel Model: 1983 Fu Hwa Seahorse
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 230
Send a message via Skype™ to mattkab
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Good to know. Poulsbo ia a nice place to go for a weekend anyway. Compare the $50 to the cost of a diver though. When you factor in time and a small amount of risk, the diver might be a good option.
This.

I used to pay for a diver, but then spent some time crawling craigslist for gear and ended up getting two full sets for just a couple hundred bucks. It's paid for itself many times over.

Usually when I get out my gear now, I ask people on the dock if I can check anything for them -- strangely nobody ever takes me up on the offer.
__________________
Thanks,
Matt B.
http://mvcesc.wordpress.com/
mattkab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2016, 12:41 PM   #11
Guru
 
Hawgwash's Avatar
 
City: Sidney
Country: Canada
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,143
Eric has you covered really well and the only thing I can add is in the planning, consider how you will get on and off when the tide is out. Note the ladder in Eric's picture. Not all grids have them or they may not be in the right place for your boat.

Also, if planning to use a portable ladder on the outward side, be aware of the bunk spacing and slipperiness for solid footing of the ladder.
Hawgwash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 06:16 AM   #12
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,601
Hard sand and a few pilings worked fine for my sailboat.
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012