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Old 09-15-2015, 05:29 PM   #21
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Here is a Seabee. It's Harbour Air BTW
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Old 09-15-2015, 05:34 PM   #22
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Here is a Seabee. It's Harbour Air BTW
I am very familiar with Harbor Air in Vancouver. That is not the company I am writing about. I'm writing about Kenmore Air Harbor on Lake Washington, often shortened to "Air Harbor" by people familiar with the company. Read the name on the side of the Seabee in my earlier post. That should clue you in to the name.

The company in more recent years changed its public name to Kenmore Air, which is more modern sounding. But the company is still incorporated as Kenmore Air Harbor, a name that has its roots in a zoning issue when the company was founded in 1946.
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Old 09-15-2015, 05:34 PM   #23
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Yes it is. Seabees were designed as amphibians. As such, they have retractable landing gear. How it works is the main gear pivots up to a position parallel with the fuselage while the tailwheel retracts into a slot (I think).

Kenmore Air Harbor, being a water operation only, removed the landing gear from their Seabee and kept the plane in the water all the time. This added more weight to the plane's useful load. If they had to remove the plane from the water they either stuck the gear back on or pulled the plane up the ramp on a dolly.

Most of the private owners of the Seabees kept at Kenmore retained the gear so they could land on runways or water.

So yes, a pilot could land a Seabee on the water, lower the gear and taxi up onto shore.
Yes, I know about the gear both fuselage and wing style but wasn't sure if they were land OR water or could drop the gear in the water and taxi up the beach as I thought I remembered.
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Old 09-15-2015, 05:44 PM   #24
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Yes, I know about the gear both fuselage and wing style but wasn't sure if they were land OR water or could drop the gear in the water and taxi up the beach as I thought I remembered.
So far as I know all Seabees were built with landing gear. However it was very easy to remove and replace so I'm sure there were more operators than just Kenmore Air Harbor who removed the gear when they didn't need it as a way of increasing the useful load of the plane.

Now the big PBY Catalina (Canso in Canada) was built both ways. In fact I believe the original PBY was a flying boat only. I believe it was Canso that designed a retractable landing gear system for the plane and produced it as an amphibian.
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Old 09-15-2015, 05:56 PM   #25
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OK, I thought Kenmore Air was absorbed by Harbour Air, but after looking it up it was West Coast Air. And KA and HA shared a terminal in Victoria.
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Old 09-15-2015, 06:13 PM   #26
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I once watched a float plane land in Quatsino Sound, wheels down. Put him on his back instantly. A few years later saw a float plane land on the runway at Port Hardy, wheels up. What a light show that was.
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Old 09-15-2015, 06:32 PM   #27
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There is a small airport in western Washington that has a paved runway and a grass runway. There used to be several floatplanes on straight floats (non-amphibious) that were kept there by their owners.

The runways are not that long and the high friction of grass meant that the floatplanes could not be taken off from that runway. So the owners purchased a purpose-built dolly that could be rolled under a floatplane and pick it up. The plane was then towed to the runway on the dolly and lined up on the centerline.

Once moving down the runway the pilot could steer the dolly with the air rudder as the dolly had castering front wheels. When the plane lifted off the dolly it released a lever that applied the brakes on the dolly and it would quickly come to a stop.

When the pilot returned, he landed on the grass runway. They would then pick up the plane with the dolly and take it to its hangar.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:47 PM   #28
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Arlington.
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Old 09-15-2015, 08:09 PM   #29
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Arlington.
No.
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Old 09-15-2015, 08:11 PM   #30
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It is very common for non-pilots perpetuate the myth that certain aircraft will "glide like a crowbar" or "come down like a rock" in the event of power failure. Not sure where these notions started but they lacking in facts.

I am not the most experienced flyer in nest (only flown about 70 different aircraft models) but I have never heard of a certified civilian airplane or helicopter that is incapable of gliding, power off, to a safe landing. In fact, just about every aircraft has some means of ADDING drag so has to be able STEEPEN glides in order to match needed decent profiles.

I have flown a twin Seabee and it would glide fine.

Steve
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Old 09-24-2015, 07:34 PM   #31
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First plane I owned was a 140 Cherokee - agree with Marin 100% - nothing wrong with Hershey bar wings, except for the spin thing.

WWII guys who flew Jugs I've talked with (when you still could) all said you could see 400 k in level flight - under they moved to the ground attack mission and started hanging half the payload of a B-17 on them.
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Old 09-25-2015, 01:10 AM   #32
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Dr. Marvin Olson of the John Muir once flew a Sea Bee to and from the John Muir when it was being used as a dental clinic. He was all over the B.C. coast back in the 70's. Had the boat set up as a dental office and traveled from place to place on the coast doing dental work.
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