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Old 12-29-2016, 10:34 AM   #1
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Type of Dingy, Inflatable or NOT?

I need a another dingy. The one I have is too old and the back transom seam is shot.

Having been told it's not repairable, I did find someone to repair it and it leaks less, but still too much.

When I made a change in dinghies two years ago, I did not realize that I was trading relatively new for pretty old.

I do not use the dingy very much. Now, is it bc it always gave me problems? or got me wet?? I don't know. In the past 2 years, it's certainly been less than a dozen times.

OK now I'm back in North America and will have to use it more.

I'm thinikning that maybe a skift, not inflatable, will do what I need.

It must be big enough for 4 people and the 5 hp outboard I have.

Inflatable or not??
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Old 12-29-2016, 11:50 AM   #2
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Two arguments for inflatables are:
- better stability (at least IMO, but I think generally, too)
- it's just a big fender, if (when) it bounces against the big boat

I've come to prefer RIBs with internal flooring, so things inside stay dry even if the bilge is sloshing a bit -- as from after a heavy rain or whatever.

Our current RIB has a folding transom; not particularly useful, for us... although in the early years (BT: Before Trailer) it meant I could deflate the thing and stuff it into the back of the Suburban.

Our previous situation meant storing that dinghy deflated. In that case, the roll-up floor was likely easier to work with compared to large flooring pieces. An inflatable floor (HPIF) would have been even easier to work with... but at the time I was worried about Big Dog (Pretty Good Pyrenees and a big Golden Receiver) toenails.... which eventually turned out to be a non-issue. I'd guess deflating and foding for storage and so forth probably not issues, in your case.

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Old 12-29-2016, 12:40 PM   #3
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I'd stick with an inflatable. I'm in the same situation. Mine is pretty much dead. Probably go new with sectional plywood floor. I use a 2hp motor which works fine.
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Old 12-29-2016, 12:50 PM   #4
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I am in the process of contemplating going to a rigid tender. I have a decent RIB with an under powered motor at the moment.

The idea of a tender that rows well and also can be used as a sailing dinghy appeals to me. I have a nice electric outboard that would work great with one and the idea of not having to store gasoline is also nice.

However, I have rarely been in a situation where I feel I need to go long distances quickly in a dinghy. Since my current RIB won't plane with the its motor I can't do that well anyhow.

So, if I am going to go slow anyway, I would rather do it quietly and with with style. If I needed to go quickly then I would need to spring for a larger outboard for my RIB. Either option is going to be expensive.
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Old 12-29-2016, 01:12 PM   #5
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Having used my RIB to unground the boat, I wouldn't change a thing.

Our 3.1M runs about 17kts. with 2 people and a 15HP engine. I have done over 20nm in it before to pick up a part while I was on the hook.
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Old 12-29-2016, 01:24 PM   #6
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We've had both and keep coming back to a RIB. Finding a skiff that fits on the boat deck, is stable, easy to get in/out of and for the same weight as a RIB, haven't seen too many.


Richard: You are in an area where you can sometimes buy with no duty. You'll also be passing by a bunch of locations that have Budget Marines, They're better than West Marine, plus you'll have several options when you get to Panama if you can wait.


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Old 12-29-2016, 01:40 PM   #7
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I can tell you that we tried the Livingston hard dual hull. While it had lots more i side space over the inflatable, we HATED IT. Under power, the water coming between the pontoons hit the outboard lower unit and splashed up into the boat. It sucked so much. At trawl speeds, it was inefficient thru the water.
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Old 12-29-2016, 02:05 PM   #8
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We just bought a used Boss/Rigid hard dinghy. So far we like it better than our old RIB. No air leaks and room to stow stuff. Yes you need to carry a couple small fenders.
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Old 12-29-2016, 02:31 PM   #9
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Some people have trouble with inflatables. Generally the damage is self inflicted. It might take a bit more care, but for all the reasons stated above, a Rib is the way to go. I switched to an inflatable 12 years ago and have never had a single problem. We cruise year round from FL to NE. We anchor frequently an like to get the dog ashore to run on the beaches. Plus we go on expeditions and have gone off 30 miles exploring with our Rib which cruises at 16-18 KT fully loaded. Some people like the livingston but as Tom said it can be a wet heavy beast. I have two friends who went that way and who went back to a rib in less than 6 months. .
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Old 12-29-2016, 02:58 PM   #10
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Wifey B: RIB RIB RIB! We use ours a lot. They are easy to handle, nothing hard to hit boat and a good RIB will handle rough conditions better than a comparably sized hard. I'm talking a RIB with a nice V. Much is personal use and need. We go exploring so we like fast...whoa big shock. We've had many days of covering a hundred miles in the RIB.

Now a preference we had too but don't expect anyone else here to have is jets. An outboard will do much the same though.

There's a huge difference in quality of RIBS. The better ones will not have the same leaking issues and will be easier to patch or even replace tubes.
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Old 12-29-2016, 03:03 PM   #11
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I had an AB290 with an internal floor. I liked the boat a lot. I gave it away after 13 years of hard duty. It is still serviceable. I bought a West Marine 310 with just the single hull/floor. I didn't think the double hull was worth the extra $500 and weight. I was wrong. THe biggest deal is the floor is not flat....it is the shape of the hull. So going from a rolling big boat to a rolling small boat with a non flat floor can be very challenging. If I had to do it again, I would get the double hull. But other than that, the boat is just fine. 20 knots with two people and a Yamaha 15hp 2 stroke.
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Old 12-29-2016, 03:10 PM   #12
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Dinghys and tenders are a hornet's nest of opinion. Mine is that I like the hard ones. I have a Sterling, made in Oregon and much like a Livingston. Tough as hell and never deflates, not even when attacked by gaff hooks, knives and fish hooks. Lots of interior volume for its 11 ft size. 9.9 hp planes it easily with a couple humans and a border collie. I'll never own another rib.
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Old 12-29-2016, 03:16 PM   #13
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Bullfrog... 'nuff said!

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Old 12-29-2016, 03:38 PM   #14
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Unless you intend to row or sail, get an inflatable.
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:08 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Unless you intend to row or sail, get an inflatable.
Wifey B: Row, row, row your boat, gently down the stream. That song leaves out a part. You have to come back up the stream. It's not downhill both ways.
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:08 PM   #16
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One gripe about my old inflatable with the plywood floor- WET FEET. No matter how I drained it, at least some water came back in the drain. Not usually an issue as I have flops on or bare feet. But sometimes I had shoes on, then I was not happy.

There has to be a better way to handle the bilge on these without increasing weight much. I like lightweight as there are times I drag it by myself over the back of the transom into the cockpit. That will be a big criterion when I go shopping.
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:26 PM   #17
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Our inflatable has an Air Deck internal floor which inflates hard and flat, and has been problem free.
Imo it is worth repairing an inflatable if the issue is obvious and confined, but if everything starts to fail it`s the dumpster.
The most durable dinghy is made of poly(?polyethylene) as used here by houseboat charter coys, but they tend to heavy, often double skinned they can get water between skins making them really heavy and strange steering, as the water shifts about.
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Old 12-29-2016, 05:57 PM   #18
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Wifey B: Row, row, row your boat, gently down the stream. That song leaves out a part. You have to come back up the stream. It's not downhill both ways.
Fortunately, here on the San Francisco estuary, currents reverse 180 degrees several times a day. Just pick the right time!

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Old 12-29-2016, 07:38 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wxx3 View Post
[...] OK now I'm back in North America and will have to use it more.
[..]
Sorry, don't mind me for the little correction but you are in France not North America
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Old 12-29-2016, 07:49 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
I had an AB290 with an internal floor. I liked the boat a lot. I gave it away after 13 years of hard duty. It is still serviceable. I bought a West Marine 310 with just the single hull/floor. I didn't think the double hull was worth the extra $500 and weight. I was wrong. THe biggest deal is the floor is not flat....it is the shape of the hull. So going from a rolling big boat to a rolling small boat with a non flat floor can be very challenging. If I had to do it again, I would get the double hull. But other than that, the boat is just fine. 20 knots with two people and a Yamaha 15hp 2 stroke.
I have the same dingy for the same reasons.

Thinking a simple slat floor will work fine as there are 2 flats on either side of the vee aft of the seat.
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