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Old 09-28-2017, 08:15 PM   #1
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Is a trawler for me

I'm turning 70 and no longer feel capable of sailing, so my wife wants to get a powerboat. We do not know much about them, so would like to start our education.
I would like to explore the Bahamas and she is interested in the Florida Keys, Cuba, and the East Coast.
We would spend most of our time on the hook, living aboard for months at a time and do not care much about speed.
15 years ago we cruised for a year 5000 miles on a 30 ft monohull, but we need more comfort today. We had a brief experience with a 28 foot Tri and lost her 25 miles off the coast of Florida on our way to the Bahamas. Enough time has passed and we’re ready to try again. 30'+ power boats seam to have plenty of space. I like multihulls cause they are so nice on the hook, however they may be beyond our budget.
We would like to spend 50 to 100 thousand USD.
Look forward to any feedback.
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:45 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by WillMcclard View Post
I'm turning 70 and no longer feel capable of sailing, so my wife wants to get a powerboat. We do not know much about them, so would like to start our education.
I would like to explore the Bahamas and she is interested in the Florida Keys, Cuba, and the East Coast.
We would spend most of our time on the hook, living aboard for months at a time and do not care much about speed.
15 years ago we cruised for a year 5000 miles on a 30 ft monohull, but we need more comfort today. We had a brief experience with a 28 foot Tri and lost her 25 miles off the coast of Florida on our way to the Bahamas. Enough time has passed and we’re ready to try again. 30'+ power boats seam to have plenty of space. I like multihulls cause they are so nice on the hook, however they may be beyond our budget.
We would like to spend 50 to 100 thousand USD.
Look forward to any feedback.
Well if you like to be on the hook, speed is not an issue, I do not see why a trawler does fit your needs. I never had any sailboat but I do not see much difference in maintenance, in sailboat you have an engine but no sail in a trawler beyond that...
What happened with your 28 feet tri?

L
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:01 PM   #3
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I always say that a trawler is just like a sail boat except it can go in a straight line!!
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:01 PM   #4
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I'm assuming Lou meant "does not" in his 1st sentence...
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:03 PM   #5
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Oh, and also, you can keep warm and dry in the pilothouse, have AC and heat, a TV, a watermaker, a real shower, and lots of other goodies!!!
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:34 PM   #6
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Sounds like a good move for you both. One thought...check out the engine room access. They can get a little tight and you'll be down there for maintenance more often than a sailboat.

Among several brands:
http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/cate...Banks/32+Sedan
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Old 09-28-2017, 10:38 PM   #7
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I'm 69 and stopped sailing for the same reasons and I got tired of living in a cave. If you going to do much ocean cruising and not fast, a deeper hull rides a little better, holds more fuel and water, maybe bigger cabins, washer and dryer room. Longer and larger isn't always an additional fuel cost.
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Old 09-28-2017, 11:40 PM   #8
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Hold on!
If you consider 70 too old to sail, it is definitely too old to be a newby in a trawler. There are so many different systems to learn, so many maintenance items to go wrong, so many differences in the dehaviour of the boat to scare the heck out of a newby.. Don't do it. Keep your sailboat. You go just as fast. You are used to the boat, you know all the systems. If you have trouble hoisting the sails, get an 18v Milwaulkee drill with a 1" winch handle sized bit and up they go. Unless your 70 yrs suffers from dimentia, sail is still a great way to go, but don't cause a complete halt to your boating by taking on a new challenge that you are not up for.
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Old 09-29-2017, 12:35 AM   #9
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I'm 55 so I can still do both (for now). We own a power boat but charter bigger sailboats a couple times a year too. Sailing is fun and we enjoy it - but only in small doses (week, ten days at a time). For us it's a comfort thing. Sailing is a lot of work and even a 50 foot sailboat is not as comfortable to move around on or live on as our 37 footer. I find even posh sailboats just uncomfortable. After tacking four or five times in an hour it starts to feel like a hassle and I sit in the cockpit thinking, boy this is a lot of work just to go from Point A to Point B. And then with a sailboat you have most if not all of the same systems and mechanical maintenance work as power, but then you add a forest of sailing hardware on top of it all. And then finally, I do get a primal thrill every time I fire up 700 horses and glide 26,000 pounds out of our slip. Master of My Domain, vroom vroom, even if I never push it past 9 knots.
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Old 09-29-2017, 01:53 AM   #10
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A "trawler" (the term is very imprecise) is merely a powerboat with living facilities. There are many options. If one is satisfied with usual sailboat speeds, then a "true" recreational trawler only capable of reaching hull speed and is very economical fuel-wise if operated one-knot below maximum speed. If you want to go faster, then you want a cabin-cruiser or the oxymoron "fast trawler" having multiple engines for propulsion. The usual "trawler" has a flybridge with two engines and will exceed hull speed. However, that isn't mandatory for a trawler.

Aside: I much prefer being in an enclosed pilothouse rather than being exposed in a cockpit or flybridge after decades in a sailboat's cockpit.

Was 64-years old when "graduating" to a trawler.
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Old 09-29-2017, 02:12 AM   #11
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IMO the short answer is yes. A trawler type boat will offer more space than a similar size sailboat. You will know if you are "too old", I doubt you`d consider this if you were. Maybe go a little bigger than 30ft. You are experienced and not put off by the loss of the 28ft trimaran. You sound adaptable, go for it,keep enjoying doing what you like. Now!
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Old 09-29-2017, 05:29 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CDreamer View Post
I'm assuming Lou meant "does not" in his 1st sentence...


Indeed I meant "does not", silly me!
Thank you for the correction.

L
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Old 09-29-2017, 06:03 AM   #13
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Welcome to the forum! I think a trawler would be a good choice for you. For the type of cruising you plan to do, I would think 36' or larger to be a better choice.

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Old 09-29-2017, 06:08 AM   #14
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Multihulls are fun because so much is done UP , not down in the hull.

This is common for most power boats 30-35+ ft.

Trawler defines the "look" as many have similar hulls and power as a motor yacht.

The key to an ex sailor is intended use.

If you plan on marina hopping one type of equipment will work fine.

If you love the anchor a totally different equipment list is required , more like your sail boat.

Change , turning a marina queen into a cruiser is very expensive and time consuming.

Purchase a boat that can be lived with your preferred lifestyle installed ,

trawler deck house or motor yacht style is not the important difference.
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Old 09-29-2017, 06:21 AM   #15
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Greetings,
Welcome aboard.
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Old 09-29-2017, 06:46 AM   #16
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Welcome.


I believe you can always teach an old dog new tricks. A power vessel such as trawler, motor yacht or whatever would be the way to go for comfort. Finding the right vessel for you is always the key which I am sure you all ready know.


Research different vessels and find two or three that you believe will fit your needs. Then charter those vessels and see how well they fit you. As far as learning the systems. You will in time, so do not worry about that.


Best of luck to you Mate.


Cheers.


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Old 09-29-2017, 06:48 AM   #17
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Hold on!
If you consider 70 too old to sail, it is definitely too old to be a newby in a trawler. There are so many different systems to learn, so many maintenance items to go wrong, so many differences in the dehaviour of the boat to scare the heck out of a newby.. Don't do it. Keep your sailboat. You go just as fast. You are used to the boat, you know all the systems. If you have trouble hoisting the sails, get an 18v Milwaulkee drill with a 1" winch handle sized bit and up they go. Unless your 70 yrs suffers from dimentia, sail is still a great way to go, but don't cause a complete halt to your boating by taking on a new challenge that you are not up for.

I dunno... systems is systems. Sailboats have 'em, powerboats have 'em. I'd imagine any sailboat would have pretty much the same systems as a powerboat of equal appointments and offering similar features. Engine, plumbing, whatever... and fixing something on a trawler shouldn't be much different that fixing the same thing on a sailboat. (Assuming access issues don't hose up the plan.)

Your comment seems useful as counterpoint, though, especially if OP already has a sailboat. (Not clear.)

OTOH, turn key, point boat... (usually)... can really simplify the "getting there from here" part of boating... even compared to electric winches... and without regard to the various service, maintenance, and upkeep issues inherent to most all boats.

FWIW, learning new systems might also be interesting and useful mental exercise for its own sake... contributing to preserving/maintaining mental agility and all that...

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Old 09-29-2017, 07:21 AM   #18
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Will,

At 70, you'll do just fine and most of the comments here are good advise. I'm in your age bracket and I find the trawler one of the easiest boats to maintain, compared to smaller power boats and my limited experience on sail boats.

But, I've never owned a sail boat and never will... just too much work. I do my sailing on a windsurfer.

A lot of the trawlers are fairly accessible to get to things, and have relative simple systems. And, there's a lot of good boat mechanics out there to help.

FFs advise is spot on!
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:00 AM   #19
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Hi. I started with my Nordic Tug 26 at 70 for something to retire to 3years ago. I had no marine experience before so had extensive and enjoyable learning curve. Lots of reading and experimenting.Last year went down ICW from Rock Hall Maryland to Faro Blanco in Marathon and had a wonderful time. Nothing ventured nothing gained. I can now do my own oil changes , change my thruster shear pin and the impeller on the generator. This has given my wife and myself a whole new outlook and so far an enjoyable retirement.

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Old 09-29-2017, 08:37 AM   #20
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Hold on!
If you consider 70 too old to sail, it is definitely too old to be a newby in a trawler. There are so many different systems to learn, so many maintenance items to go wrong, so many differences in the dehaviour of the boat to scare the heck out of a newby.. Don't do it. Keep your sailboat. You go just as fast. You are used to the boat, you know all the systems. If you have trouble hoisting the sails, get an 18v Milwaulkee drill with a 1" winch handle sized bit and up they go. Unless your 70 yrs suffers from dimentia, sail is still a great way to go, but don't cause a complete halt to your boating by taking on a new challenge that you are not up for.
He said he was 70, not that he was dead! And he doesn't have a sailboat, he doesn't currently have a boat at all.

I disagree with your advice. He is an experienced boater, just not with a trawler. A trawler is pretty similar to a sailboat that's operating under power, not sail. The "systems" are the same and there's nothing "scary" about a trawler that's different from a sailboat.

It's actually very common for sailors to transition to trawlers as they get to the point in life where operating a sailboat becomes difficult physically.
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