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Old 11-21-2015, 11:04 PM   #41
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Getting back to the idea of what boat you are interested in.... I will share my criteria when I was shopping for a boat. I wanted flush deck from the inside helm to the stern. I wanted a cockpit I could walk out to, carrying food, cocktails or stuff without having to climb up, down and back up ladders to get to. I wanted a cockpit large enough to sit a couple chairs in. I wanted a cockpit that I could throw a fishing rod from.

Many of the 'trawlers' mentioned in this forum are 'down, up, down design. Meaning climbing ladders to go from the front to back inside. That was a deal killer for me. I want to be able to see all the way from the chain locker back to the transom. Toting my Grandkids around I wanted excellent visibility, side decks and a big flybridge. I also wanted both upper and lower helms. Your requirements may be different. Keep looking until you find what you want. (Then again, that may change as you are looking!)
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Old 11-22-2015, 06:13 AM   #42
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- cruise at 1000 RPMs = approx. 7 GPH @ approx. 7.5 kts "

The usual displacement trawler might get by at 7.5K with 1/2 to 1/3 the fuel burn.

The price to go fast is being paid in fuel as well as engine life.

Folks that prefer the Trawler Crawl might do best with a trawler, the price of speed is Always high.
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Old 11-22-2015, 08:56 AM   #43
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Genecop - Welcome Aboard!

Having reviewed this thread and seeing that much of the Trawler definition BS as well as the gph graphs/discussion has been well gone over again (go to search feature - there are many threads about all this stuff)...

I offer this advice.

1. Read all you can about boats and their designs.

2. With your Admiral go and look at (get aboard) as many different design boats as you can.

3. You two make up a list of what each of you would like to have in a boat and to have the boat do. Be careful to be honest with yourselves regarding what you need as well as what and how you will use the boat for.

4. After you have your list - post it on TF. There will be plenty of clarified suggestions offered. Also, go to search feature to locate plenty of threads about such.

5. Unless you plan to cruise continuously putting on much mileage per year... don't let fuel use get too heavy on your mind. For vast majority of boats i.e. FD / SD / P... go slow and use much less fuel; go fast and use much more. If your annual boat budget has enough flexibility to absorb a plus or minus five hundred to one or even two thousand dollar change in fuel costs... then all is OK! It's the boat design and comfort features I believe you should focus on!

BTW: $2000 divided by 52 weeks = only $38.46 The cost of even more enjoyment aboard a Pleasure Cruising Boat!

Happy Boat-Chosen Daze! - Art
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Old 11-22-2015, 05:07 PM   #44
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Got a "workboat" hull. Got heavy displacement. Got a low-powered engine. Got living accommodations. Got range (1000-1500 miles). Can just keep up with the local fishing trawlers. All I need to fully-qualify as a trawler is a dragging net.

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Old 11-22-2015, 07:04 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by cappy208 View Post
Getting back to the idea of what boat you are interested in.... I will share my criteria when I was shopping for a boat. I wanted flush deck from the inside helm to the stern. I wanted a cockpit I could walk out to, carrying food, cocktails or stuff without having to climb up, down and back up ladders to get to. I wanted a cockpit large enough to sit a couple chairs in. I wanted a cockpit that I could throw a fishing rod from.

Many of the 'trawlers' mentioned in this forum are 'down, up, down design. Meaning climbing ladders to go from the front to back inside. That was a deal killer for me. I want to be able to see all the way from the chain locker back to the transom. Toting my Grandkids around I wanted excellent visibility, side decks and a big flybridge. I also wanted both upper and lower helms. Your requirements may be different. Keep looking until you find what you want. (Then again, that may change as you are looking!)
Sounds a lot like my trawler!

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Old 11-23-2015, 05:11 AM   #46
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  • This said it well:
    Recreational trawlers are pleasure boats which resemble fishing trawlers. They can also be called cruising trawlers or trawler yachts. Within the category, however, are many types and styles of vessels. A fishing trawler for example, always has a displacement hull for load-carrying capacity, and a towed net.
    Then there are Troller boats. :-)


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Old 11-23-2015, 06:33 AM   #47
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With $2.00 gasoline here in many places , and $2.00 diesel on the way , does fuel burn really matter that much any more?
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Old 11-23-2015, 06:37 AM   #48
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The current price of fuel is temporary. It will go back up.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:33 AM   #49
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Fly: A great picture of a boat using fuel to move water instead of the boat. That PIX should be shown to all the "hull speed" fans.
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Old 11-23-2015, 09:16 AM   #50
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Fly: A great picture of a boat using fuel to move water instead of the boat. That PIX should be shown to all the "hull speed" fans.
Yup, I bet he is burning 3- 4 gph, sinful.
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Old 11-23-2015, 09:31 AM   #51
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He has some fishing rods, maybe he's trolling. That makes the boat a "troller" right ?
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Old 11-23-2015, 09:48 AM   #52
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Fuel prices when adjusted for inflation are currently pretty low. At the same time prices when they are 'back up' are still not that expensive when looked at over a longer time period. Sure it feels like fuel it high when I compare it to buying marine diesel at $1 gallon but a lot has changed in all our lives since those prices. Even though it may feel costly as prices rise it is the comparison to what we earn and what all other costs are that make the real difference.


Inflation Adjusted Gasoline Prices
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Old 11-23-2015, 10:00 AM   #53
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Fuel prices when adjusted for inflation are currently pretty low. At the same time prices when they are 'back up' are still not that expensive when looked at over a longer time period. Sure it feels like fuel it high when I compare it to buying marine diesel at $1 gallon but a lot has changed in all our lives since those prices. Even though it may feel costly as prices rise it is the comparison to what we earn and what all other costs are that make the real difference.


Inflation Adjusted Gasoline Prices
Very informative! Thanks!!
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Old 11-23-2015, 10:27 AM   #54
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My numbers

This weekend I finally took the time to do some fuel consumption tests. I took measurements in two passes in opposite directions to cancel out the flood that I was facing. Here are the results:

Kadey Krogen 54 - John Deere 6068T 225HP - 1200 US gal fuel tanks

Speed nmpg range (nm)
5.3kt - 3.5 - 4200
6.0kt - 3.0 - 3600
6.9kt - 2.5 - 3000
7.5kt - 2.0 - 2400
7.8kt - 1.5 - 1800
9.0kt - 1.0 - 1200

Of course these were calm waters - extra fuel would be required to push through waves. I hope to get some measurements in different sea states. Also - the range assumes no reserve fuel - I would want 20% reserve.

Note that this assumes my FloScan is accurate. This will need to be checked at some point.

This isn't purely academic. When I retire I'd like to head to the South Pacific via Hawaii.

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Old 11-23-2015, 12:46 PM   #55
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My boat gets from 3.5 NMPH at 7 knots to 6 NMPH at 6 knots.

Yanmar 4JH4-HTE. 1800 rpm burns about 1gph at goes about 6 knots. 2200 rpm burns about 2gph and goes about 7knots. Based on Yanmar fuel curves.

Tank pretty small at 200 gallons with 10% reserve so range is only 700-1200 nm based on speed and no genny.

Real world experience:
With the genny running almost constantly while underway (and at night some also) and running at 7 knots I averaged about 2.5 gallons per hour underway from Clearwater FL to Rockport TX.
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Old 11-23-2015, 01:08 PM   #56
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Tom I'm think'in the classic GB's of the early 70's is about as trawler as you can get. Wer'nt they the original trawler?

Advertiseing dosn't count as it's bottom line is manipulation not a tool for truth and fact.
Of course advertising/marketing counts. That's the only reason the term "trawler" was applied to recreational boats in the first place, to project the attributes of a seaworthy fishing vessel onto a recreational boat that looked vaguely like one in the hopes that buyers would think it more capable than it really was. It's all about image.

Grand Banks did not call their boats "trawlers" until fairly recently when the general use of the term for marketing purposes became so pervasive in the recreational boat market they were pretty much forced to adapt it themselves.
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Old 11-23-2015, 01:28 PM   #57
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Note that this assumes my FloScan is accurate. This will need to be checked at some point.

This isn't purely academic. When I retire I'd like to head to the South Pacific via Hawaii.

Richard
Richard, you are a bright guy and know this - once you get to the point to do the South Seas, a day tank would be a nice to have thing. Day tanks allow very precise fuel measurement thus negating the vagaries of solely relying upon floscans.
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Old 11-23-2015, 02:09 PM   #58
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Another advantage of the day tank is that any fuel that goes into it has been filtered/dewatered befor it gets there. My trawler has two 30 gallon day tanks above the engines in port and stb settees in the saloon. I know, you're gonna tell me that fuel shouldnt be above the fuel pump. And I agree, but it sure makes filter changes and priming easier. And air in the lines is NEVER a problem, because the system doesnt "suck" in either way. I have a 1/3 hp gear rotor pump for cleaning fuel ( thru large dual switchable Davco units) and moving it between tanks. The day tanks have float switches that turn the 12 volt tranfer pump on and off at preset levels. They normally pump 10 gallons at a time. I have a water witch cycle counter that keeps track of the number of times the pumps run. This makes it fairly easy to calculate gph. the entire fuel system is seperated, port and stb, but fuel can be transfered by the gear rotor pump to any of the 4 lower tanks. I have two 500 gallon "bulk" tanks that are the only tanks that can take on new fuel. I have two 150 gallon tanks that recieve filtered fuel from the bulk tanks. 12 volt transfer pumps move it from there to the day tanks. The bulk tanks can gravity flow into the mid tanks if neccessary but I like to run it thru the cleaning setup first. The gear rotor pump is valved so as to be able to circulate and clean any of the tanks, except the day tanks, which can be emptied into the bulk tanks by gravity and accessed thru large clean out hatches in the top. EVERY tank has access to every baffled chamber for cleaning. It all sounds kinda complicated but not once you understand whats going on. Clean fuel is the very very most important thing.
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Old 11-23-2015, 02:28 PM   #59
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Richard, you are a bright guy and know this - once you get to the point to do the South Seas, a day tank would be a nice to have thing. Day tanks allow very precise fuel measurement thus negating the vagaries of solely relying upon floscans.
Thanks! Yes I have considered a day tank. There isn't really a proper fuel manifold on my boat - so at some point I want to build and install one. The challenge for adding a day tank will be finding room for it!

I assume that people us a sight gauge to get an accurate reading of consumption from the day tank? Also - the return would have to be directed there too...

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Old 11-23-2015, 02:34 PM   #60
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The challenge for adding a day tank will be finding room for it!
The previous owner of our boat replaced the three original tanks with five smaller ones. Four are saddle tanks, the fifth one is a 60 gallon day tank. It is located in the bilge on the centerline of the boat under the engine room floor plates between the aft ends of the inboard engine stringers. In this position it is totally out of the way and uses space that was unused and empty before.

Perhaps something like this could work on your boat?
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