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Old 12-02-2019, 01:06 AM   #1
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Trawler chb redoing teak decks

I have a 34 foot chb trawler I need to do the decks I bought some teak decking materials but I was talking to guy he was telling me I might want to pull the teak deck up an use non-skid paint. it leaks very bad on the port side aft cabin I want to do it right if non-skid would work it'd be less maintenance I think if that stuff works but everybody on here has been really helpful so far I was wanting to get some opinions the boards are tight on the port side but the cocking is cracked it leaks really bad in the aft cabin some boards are loose on the starboard side and there are gaps in the caulking I'm not sure how to go about patching the screw holes or what to do an not do. any help would be greatly appreciated thank you so much Robert
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:04 AM   #2
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Well, I would recommend removing the teak and refinishing the decks with nonskid paint. But to do it correctly is a ton of work. If the screws have been leaking the coring is probably wet and/or rotted. If it is you will need to replace the core and glass over the top. Then you can paint the dck with a paint like Kiwigrip which is really good nonskid paint. If the core isnít bad then you could fill the screw holes and paint the deck. However the teak may be part of the deck structure and if it is then you will have to lay some more glass on top to make up for the lost strength. Unfortunately if you remove the old caulk and recaulk the teak it will eventually need to be redone. Teak decks are a never ending source of work.
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:32 AM   #3
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I was lucky and even though my decks were wet for years, being a good teak plywood must have helped as they are still structurally strong after 8 years of being glassed over and drying out.


Unfortunately the flybridge continues to soften because it was made of teak blocks poortly engineered, not plywood.
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Old 12-02-2019, 01:17 PM   #4
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Robert,
Screwed down teak decks (while attractive to look at and feel good underfoot) were on my "don't want list" when boat shopping.
One experienced broker I dealt with suggested removing and recaulking 20% of the screws every year on a rotational basis. In that way, they would be "refurbished" every 5 years. Not my cup of tea!! Way, way too much work and too much downside when they do leak (if not adequately maintained).

My advice, especially if you are planning on keeping the boat for the longer term, is to bite the bullet now. Pull up all the teak, repair the deck as needed (hopefully you don't have rot), and put on non skid.
Unfortunately if you have "bad leaks" (unless they started suddenly), you probably do have wet coring and are looking at a potentially very big job.
Sorry, but just my best guess and opinion based on what you have stated.
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:21 PM   #5
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We only have teak on our sundeck which has a hardtop and side curtains all around. The caulking was starting to go bad so I set out to refinish and recaulk the deck. What a terrible job. I have back problems and it took several hundred hours on my hands and knees. Never again. Best plan is to get rid of them and glass the deck and then paint with a nonskid paint.
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:27 PM   #6
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...teak decks (while attractive to look at and feel good underfoot) were on my "don't want list" when boat shopping.
One experienced broker I dealt with suggested removing and recaulking 20% of the screws every year on a rotational basis. In that way, they would be "refurbished" every 5 years. Not my cup of tea!! Way, way too much work and too much downside when they do leak (if not adequately maintained).
Ditto. Hell no. Nah. Nope. Never. I even worry about intrusions into the core from small screws etc. I over-drilled and sealed any/all on our current boat's intrusions into the balsa core and any areas that were exposed from the factory. Even the anchor rode hawse-pipe was only sealed with a white sealant (4000, 5200?) smeared over the core. Luckily, our boat was brand new and relatively small by most standards here.



I realize no boat is perfect, but anything with a teak deck is out. Looked at a few Grand Banks. All had teak decking, even the upper deck/FB. Off the list.
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:30 PM   #7
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If I may:





It's a four part series, but will give you an idea of what is possibly in store.
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:36 PM   #8
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You can identify screws / bungs that are leaking by their dark color. I remove the bung and screw. Drill out the hole to 3/8 inch and drill right down into the core. (Careful not to go through the bottom layer of fiberglass.). I then fill the hole with slightly thickened epoxy resin and pound in a new bung to the wet epoxy. Done deal. If the teak has to come off one day just slide a chisel under and break the epoxy.
Pulling the teak deck up and glassing is a nice ending but lots of work and or $$$$$
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:58 PM   #9
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Glued down teak versus screwed down teak are 2 different animals.
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:09 PM   #10
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Glued down teak versus screwed down teak are 2 different animals.
They both require caulking, which means maintaining them though, correct?
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:25 PM   #11
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I imagine that you will have more $ into the boat than it will be worth after your investment.
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:51 PM   #12
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They both require caulking, which means maintaining them though, correct?

Yes some maintenance...but way less of a headache than screws and bungs.



If the caulking gets aways from you on glued ...at least it will not cause deck damage or leaks.
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:21 PM   #13
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Even the caulking is a PITA to do. That is what I did to my sundeck teak this last winter. Several hundred hours on my knees...
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:17 PM   #14
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psneeld,
Agreed, there is a big difference between glued down and screwed down teak decks. Personally, I don't want either, but with the glued down, you don't have the same worries about the deck core getting wet and worse yet rotting away.
In my humble opinion, with screwed down teak decks you will eventually have potentially big problems unless you are diligent with the large amount of required maintenance!
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:01 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcan View Post
I have a 34 foot chb trawler I need to do the decks I bought some teak decking materials but I was talking to guy he was telling me I might want to pull the teak deck up an use non-skid paint. it leaks very bad on the port side aft cabin I want to do it right if non-skid would work it'd be less maintenance I think if that stuff works but everybody on here has been really helpful so far I was wanting to get some opinions the boards are tight on the port side but the cocking is cracked it leaks really bad in the aft cabin some boards are loose on the starboard side and there are gaps in the caulking I'm not sure how to go about patching the screw holes or what to do an not do. any help would be greatly appreciated thank you so much Robert
After reading all of the horror stories here about leaky decks, when I had a leak into my fwd cabin I blamed the aging teak deck. I found a spot at the joint between the teak deck and the front of the fwd cabin fibreglass where the caulking had apparently failed. I pulled out the caulking and pulled off the edging teak board, replaced it all properly, using Lifecaulk black caulking, following the instructions to the letter and on the first rainy day following that repair, had no change in the leak.

After a few years of trying other things, a few years ago I caulked the joint between the fwd hatch and the fibreglass deck and my leak stopped. That joint didn't even look like it was near failure. Had I simply redone the simple things first, I wouldn't have cursed my teak decks and I would have fixed the problem several years earlier.

Be absolutely sure you know where the leak is coming from before you embark on expensive repairs/changes.
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Old 12-02-2019, 11:31 PM   #16
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Robert,

Teak decks are beautiful and worth all the trouble. Hope you find your leak and fix it.
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Old 12-03-2019, 08:18 AM   #17
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Wife and I recauked our entire fly bridge on a weekend.
40 to 45 working hours or so.
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Old 12-06-2019, 10:19 PM   #18
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Glued down teak is a great way to go. My bow is fitted with glued down teak which came in sections. It was then glued on top of fiberglass. As stated, even if the chalking leaks a little it doesn’t cause any issues. I love the look and feel of the teak deck. It does however require some Semco sealer every few months to maintain the beauty
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Old 12-06-2019, 10:31 PM   #19
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No thanks. Our boat is our sanctuary. More work...nope.

To each his own...
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Old Yesterday, 10:29 AM   #20
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We removed all the teak on our Hershine, except the flybridge. Not really that bad of a project, way worth it. Only way to eliminate deck leaks. Used a small jack hammmer and a wide flat chisel blade. Rip and tear!Sanded off the mastic and filled the screw holes with resin. Had 2 or 3 soft spots, cut the fiberglass, removed the mush underneath, replaced with good plywood, marine grade Baltic birch, soak with resin and replaced fiberglass that was removed. Added a layer of fiberglass cloth. Used kiwi deck on main deck and woven vinyl flooring that looks like teak on the rear house roof, Great Product. A bit of work, but the boat will love you for it.
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