Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-15-2015, 12:13 PM   #61
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Most small boats from the fifties had flat bottoms to take advantage of low horse outboards.

I dont believe the vee and deep vee didn't catch on till power plants ponied up.

Both outboard boats we owned when I was a kid were much heavier I believe than an equivalent whaler or shallow vee mako type. Just from working on them and shifting blocking they seemed to be heavier.

A quick check shows a 1968 19 foot wood Lyman skiff at 2500 pounds and a 1969 19 foot glass Mako at 1500 pounds...sounds like a BIG difference to me. Other glass boats and newer glass boats are generally lighter.
__________________
Advertisement

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 08:19 PM   #62
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,633
Here you go. This is about as close as you are gonna get in a "larger" monohull. And it still misses on some of your criteria.
Shannon 38 SRD for Sale
__________________

__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 09:02 PM   #63
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I agree! I've never owned one but here is something I've learned over the years. Those who bad mouth the Bayliner 4588 & 4788 have never cruised on one! I used to be of that ilk. As I've stated countless times before...You doubters should take a ride on one.....you'll come away a changed person!
Yes, I have no illusions that the interior of my 4788 is of the same caliber as some other much more expensive boats. That said, there is always a bigger, or more expensive boat out there, the sky is the limit.

What the Bayliners offer is a seaworthy, reliable platform, with a nicely done interior, and the benefits brought on by the fact that there was a team of engineers designing every aspect of them.

After four years on our 4788, looking it over with a very descriminating eye, I have found very few design defects, or things that I would do differently if I were to re-do the design.

On this boat I am adding functionality things, not fixing issues that a good design team sould have caught pre-production.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 10:54 PM   #64
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,724
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Most small boats from the fifties had flat bottoms to take advantage of low horse outboards.

I dont believe the vee and deep vee didn't catch on till power plants ponied up.

Both outboard boats we owned when I was a kid were much heavier I believe than an equivalent whaler or shallow vee mako type. Just from working on them and shifting blocking they seemed to be heavier.

A quick check shows a 1968 19 foot wood Lyman skiff at 2500 pounds and a 1969 19 foot glass Mako at 1500 pounds...sounds like a BIG difference to me. Other glass boats and newer glass boats are generally lighter.

The "deep V" boats started w a 31' offshore racing boat called "Moppie". She won the 1961 Miami Nassau offshore powerboat race easily and the high deadrise "deep V" hull became popular quickly. Moppie was powered by two 375hp V8 gas engines probably Chris Craft/Lincoln. Not an OB.

Not many boats were flat bottom. Most were 6 to 10 degrees (approx) called V hulls. Frequently they were called "warped" bottoms as each side was twisted. Most were nearly flat astern .. 3 - 5 degrees.

A planked wood boat was about as heavy as a modern FG boat I think. But some like the clinker built Lyman were lighter as much less framing was required. These lap strake boats Thompson, Cruisers Inc ect were lighter than FG boats (IMO) but carvel planked wood boats were sometimes fairly light but most were quite heavy requiring lots of frames and battens. Most of the later clinker built boats were planked w strips of plywood so technically plywood boats. But they were heavier than a paneled plywood boat because of the extensive overlapping of planks. Some plywood boats were not light .. especially the fishing and other commercial boats. But small OB pleasure boats were much lighter than the average FG boat. I had a 17' plywood Bryant OB cruiser w a 35hp Johnson and it performed well w 2 or 3 people aboard. Not the softest riding or best handling boat though. They were built w oak frames (not that many) and mahogany plywood. The mahogany topsides were frequently varnished at the Bryant plant. They had yellow bottoms of paint that was so hard it was difficult to sand.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 04:21 PM   #65
Member
 
Roughin'it's Avatar
 
City: Port Orchard, WA
Country: US
Vessel Name: Roughin'it
Vessel Model: 1983 37' Roughwater
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 21
Look at 37' Roughwater. Mine has a single engine and tops out about 13 knots. She's a cheap date at 8.5-9 knots (2 GPH). No aft cabin but lots of deck space. Find one with twins and you will get your speed from the extra HP.
Good Luck
__________________
Roughin'it
Roughin'it is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 04:24 PM   #66
Guru
 
Carolena's Avatar
 
City: DC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carolena II
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32/34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puffin_NT32 View Post
Nordic Tug 32/34:
- 270 HP Cummins.
- normal cruise at 8 knots.
- cruise all day at 12+ knots (2000-2200 rpm).
- WOT 2600 rpm top end of 18 knots.
- 10 year average of 1.5 GPH.
- 200 gallons fuel, 100 gallons water
- no flybridge, but a chariot bridge option is available.
I was going to make the same comment. Ours is only a 220 HP, so our WOT is only 15.5 knots and 12+ is on the higher end of fast cruise for us, but the other figures are pretty close. Actually, we are more like 2.5 gph at 7.5-8 knots. If you move up to a 37/39 you can get a flybridge, but will be in the 250-300k range as it is a more recent option. We were ready to buy a Camano when we came across the NT in our price range. We liked the Camano, but this boat has more space. We thought we would miss the flybridge, but I'm now committed to a pilothouse. With all the doors, windows and hatch open, it is like being outside without all the sun. When the weather isn't cooperating (ran or late fall/early spring) it can't be beat. And if it is too hot, just run with the genny and AC. As for the accommodations in the 32-34, no aft cabin but the full width saloon gives a lot of room for such a small boat, and the pull out couch is great for occasional guests.
Carolena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 05:38 PM   #67
Senior Member
 
City: louisiana
Country: usa
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 207
"The "deep V" boats started w a 31' offshore racing boat called "Moppie". She won the 1961 Miami Nassau offshore powerboat race easily and the high deadrise "deep V" hull became popular quickly."

Actually, the original Ray Hunt deep "V" was a 23ft boat called Aqua Hunter. It's performance caught the eye of some guy called Richard Bertram...whoever that was..who asked hunt to design a 30 footer with the same 24deg aft deadrise hull. The original was called Moppie and was of wooden construction. It became the initial design of the famous 31 Bertram. A very wet boat even up in the FB but built like a tank.
rardoin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2015, 07:44 AM   #68
Member
 
City: Washington DC
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roughin'it View Post
Look at 37' Roughwater. Mine has a single engine and tops out about 13 knots. She's a cheap date at 8.5-9 knots (2 GPH). No aft cabin but lots of deck space. Find one with twins and you will get your speed from the extra HP.
Good Luck
Roughin'it:
Thanks for the lead. I had not come across the Roughwaters yet but they seem in line with what I'd like.

Todd
__________________

ToddS is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012