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Old 06-11-2015, 12:28 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by janice142 View Post
Eric. I too am thinking about Steve's brilliant plan. I wondered at an extended U-bolt? The thought being to drill a couple holes through the gunnel of Algae, then shove the u-bolt around the support post and through the gunnel. A couple of wing nuts and the dink is held in place.

Can you (or anyone else) see anything wrong with that? (Saves the extend curved brace) ..............
Janice, I think that the friction between the U-bolt and the support post will be insufficient to prevent the dinghy from pivoting as the mother-ship rocks back and forth. Your proposal would probably work fine if the davit remained free to rotate (use lines attached to bow and stern of dinghy to prevent unwanted pivoting).

Will you be taking advantage of the "L.O.A. shortening" that my pivoting davit provides? If not, then a conventional two arm davit might be better.

Lastly, if you are only using the davit as a way to get the dinghy up onto the house top (as Eric proposes), then I believe that it will not be necessary to affix the dinghy to the davit post at all.

Steve
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Old 06-11-2015, 12:55 PM   #82
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Steve,
That was one of the reasons I was gravitating that way. The other was that the length of the boom would be less reducing weight or increasing the capacity of the lift. The boom probably would not need to rise or fall (just rotate) if designed carefully.
Your channel to gunnel arrangement dos'nt lend itself to home construction unless you're a welder.
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Old 06-11-2015, 05:25 PM   #83
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Quote:
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Will you be taking advantage of the "L.O.A. shortening" that my pivoting davit provides? If not, then a conventional two arm davit might be better.
This is my setup Steve:


I have a single post (Schedule 40, stainless) that sits atop (thru-booted) the transom, and goes through the overhead to support the wind generator.

The davit itself? I found that on the side of the road. Singular, but it was stainless. You understand right? Solid bars, hefty and beautiful. So I had Kidlet stop the car and retrieved same.

It's been welded on an overlapping pipe that rotates. Cleat rotates with davit.

I will not be shortening the boat. I simply want to get Algae up out of the water so I can stop scraping barnacles.

First Problem is equipment. I've got two blocks (both doubles, one with and one without a becket) and according to an engineer friend, he suggested I needed triples in order to get enough gain to lift the dink up. I have little strength...

Before I lay out cash for them though, I want to make sure they work. Unless I spot a pair at one of the marine swaps one day. It's on my list.

Usually when underway I simply raised the bow up out of the water by a couple feet, securing it with two lines (one inside on an eye-bolt, and the other the U-bolt on the outside)

Putting it across the swim deck is easy and works perfectly EXCEPT I could not get out of the water should I fall in. And so that's o-u-t. Safety and all that...

I could using marlinespike create a rope ladder however the one on the swim deck works great with three steps in the water. I like that thing.



Your system, with that piece on the upright? That looks like something that might be workable. When the welder is next door (they are doing a major overhaul -- my boat is spotted with rust stains everywhere) I'll ask what he thinks. But not until he's further along in his project.

You're a welder. You KNOW what a pain in the transom it is when folks interrupt your work with more work for you to do! Daddy was a welder and everybody is your pal when the torches are out. Sigh.

Timing...

And too Eric suggested something out of wood might work. I'm still pondering options. Yours though, well, it's spiffy.

Congratulations on a plan well executed.
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Old 06-11-2015, 05:40 PM   #84
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The channel into Hamburg Cove has silted in? That's a shame; one of our favorite places to hang out for a few days.
Well, it was a very windy day and so I did drift outside the little red and green Clorox bottle markers a little, but I know when I was a teenager (early 80's) if I jumped out of my Blue Jay in that area I could just touch the bottom with my toes with my head still above water. A little tidal I know, but as I remember only a couple feet usually. Our boat draws 3' 7" and although we didn't run hard aground, we did touch bottom and I churned up a lot of mud easing out of there. Even when I got back to between the markers it was still way too shallow for comfort and so we gave up. We did a lot of the other things I love though, fond memory stuff -- tied up at the Goodspeed dock, lunch at the Gelston House, blew the horn at the Chester Ferry, waved to Gillette Castle (which my wife thinks is hideously ugly), stayed at Essex Island Marina, took the mini-ferry across the channel in Essex, dinner at the Gris. Funny, purely by accident we even sat at the same table as the table I had for my senior prom ("senior reception") for Valley Regional HS with Caroline Walsh (hello Caroline, wherever you are! Had a fantastic time!). I thought about staying at one of the Chester marinas for old time's sake but of course you need a car to go eat somewhere at those while in Essex you just stroll to the Gris. (And now I have the money to hang out in Essex too, at least for a day, ha!)

Sheesh, talk about thread drift. Okay, back to our regularly scheduled programming. Enough memory lane stuff.
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Old 06-11-2015, 06:35 PM   #85
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So, how many travel without a dinghy? Most of our travels will be on rivers and intercoastal, but a gulf crossing is always possible.
The answer to your query about cruising without a dinghy lies in how you are going to be cruising. If you are going to be marina-hopping---- all your destinations will be docks attached to the shore--- then a dinghy will not be necessary. Note that "necessary," "advisable" and "beneficial" are three different concepts.

If you plan to anchor out, however, unless you are content with remaining on board your boat some means of conveyance to shore, docks, or other boats will be needed.

The previous posts contain all manner of good ideas on how to carry a dinghy, even if your boat is not set up for the obvious choices: swimstep mount, cabin-top mount, foredeck mount, transom mount. Foldboats, storeable inflatables, etc. can all be used to get around. Or, like a lot of boaters, a dinghy can be towed very successfully, particularly if your cruising is on inland or coastal waters.

Like most of the other posters, we find a shore/utility boat to be absolutely essential to our cruising. We anchor or tie up to mooring buoys far more than we go to docks.

Our boat--- as small as it is at 36'--- has two dinghies. The boat came with a lovely Montgomery rowing/sailing dinghy that sits in a cradle on the aft cabin top. It's a wonderful little boat to sail or row, but it's small and launching it with the mast and boom is a time-consuming process. It's also a tricky boat to get in and out of as like all traditional-style sailing dinghies it has a round bottom and so is pretty "tippy."

So within a few months of buying the cruiser we added a very stable hardshell dinghy using Weaver davits on the swimstep. This dinghy is immensely stable and pretty much indestructible (we don't like fabric dinghies because they have finite lives).

We use it for transportation to and from shore, for setting crab traps, fishing, you name it. For the crusing we do in the waters we do it in, I cannot imagine not having a rugged, stable shoreboat aboard.

Our boat is the outboard boat in the photo.
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Old 06-12-2015, 01:20 AM   #86
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Janice, Thanks for posting the pictures, that clarifies your situation.

That's great the way your davit/windgen pole passes through the cabin roof. Nice and strong.

Here is an idea: How about mounting a couple of wooden "chocks" to Seaweed's gunnel. One on either side of your davit say, about 4 feet apart. Make them so that Algae's gunnel fits or otherwise is secured to them. The davit will still be carrying most of Algae's weight. Make these chocks high enough so that your ladder/swimstep can still be used in case of M.O.B (W.O.B). It would mean that you would be lying on the swimstep under Algae but at least you will still be alive. Perhaps you will be able to worm your way back aboard Seaweed if you position the chock (that corresponds to the bow of algae) far enough inboard.

And for anyone who stores a dingy in their davits, don't forget to drill a hole in the low point of the hull as a heavy rain downpour will quickly turn your davits into a pretzel.

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Old 06-12-2015, 09:06 AM   #87
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And for anyone who stores a dingy in their davits, don't forget to drill a hole in the low point of the hull as a heavy rain downpour will quickly turn your davits into a pretzel.
Good point! As noted in a previous post, I sold my dinghy. The photo of the boat is with the dinghy in its cradle. (slightly bow down.) The second photo is a snap shot from the video showing us launching the dinghy. Note the extreme pitching down of the bow when the boat clears the cradle. We all thought that the OP really screwed up when he made the sling. The real reason the bow pitched down is that the dinghy had collected rain water over the years and we estimated that we drained about 20-30 gallons of water out of it. The water was under the floor in the "V" of the hull and could not be seen on a casual inspection of the boat in the cradle.
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Old 06-12-2015, 12:27 PM   #88
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I am very surprised that there are dinghies made that don't have bilge drains installed by the manufacturer. Our Livingston has them (two, actually, one for each "hull"), Bullfrog's have them, our sailing/rowing dinghy has them, most of the RIBs I've looked at have them, etc. We wouldn't buy a dinghy that didn't have one, particularly in our rainy part of the world.

For dinghies carried upright so they can collect water, it should be a simple matter to carry it in such a way that any water that gets inside runs back to the bilge drain which is simply left open until the boat's going to be used.

In the case of dinghies carried upright on davits, it's just a matter of carrying it slightly tilted toward the drain. In the photo in my post #85 you can see the slight aft-down angle of my friend's Bullfrog.

The only people I've ever encountered who have problems with rainwater collecting in their dinghies are the folks who leave them in the water beside their boats in the slip.
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Old 06-12-2015, 01:36 PM   #89
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Marin, Unlike their motorized (planing type) brethren, I believe that most rowing dinghys do not have drain plugs because their transoms are well above the lowest point of the boat. And even if part of the transom did extend low enough, No oarsman can row fast enough to drain while under way.

My Walkerbay dink did not come with a drain and even if it did, It would likely have been in the wrong place given the weird stowage angle dictated by my unique situation.

Steve
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:13 PM   #90
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I am very surprised that there are dinghies made that don't have bilge drains installed by the manufacturer.
I would suggest that dinghy drains be equipped so that the water can be used for something else. It's fresh water, after all.

On Algae, I keep her scrupulously clean in the summer thunder-boomer weather. Her pump goes through a filter and then into the water tank. If I were larger (bigger boat) I'd have it pumped into a separate tank for other uses.

Aside: Algae is 7' long and a plain old fiberglass dink. To the seats is 50 gallons. Filled, she holds 100 gallons of water. That's a lot if you like showers as much as I do. Of course my hair is half-way down my back so washing the hair is important to my happiness quotient.

I'd tried to figure out a way to use a spigot of sorts with a hose fitting. Haven't quite moved that to the front burner. Yet.

Aside for Ready2Go: The tarp I have for my bow has a plastic thru-hull attached. Thus, when it rains, I can screw on a hose and fill the tank with all that water. Not sure if your set-up could do something similar but there you have it. An idea since you have nothing else to do.

Dinghy's have a lot of uses.
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:25 PM   #91
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Marin it only takes a few minutes to install a hull bottom drain plug. Readily availible at marine hardware stores. I put one in the yellow dink ... a propper bronze fitting.

Steve I was wondering about the drain on your Dink tilted up like that.

Janice,
Your minimalist ways are really very interesting. When you made your first post on TF did you imagine soon there would be hundreds of guys hang'in on your every word? There are you know.
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:34 PM   #92
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Your minimalist ways are really very interesting. When you made your first post on TF did you imagine soon there would be hundreds of guys hang'in on your every word? There are you know.
Too funny. And I don't believe a word of it.

Y'all are just right nice folks. And believe me, I'm not an expert. If you don't believe that, see the Tractor thread.

I wish I remembered more... Daddy was the smart one. I'm still learning.

But thank you nonetheless.
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:48 PM   #93
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Marin, Unlike their motorized (planing type) brethren, I believe that most rowing dinghys do not have drain plugs because their transoms are well above the lowest point of the boat.
Our fiberglass Montgomery rowing/sailing dinghy (first shot is ours, second shot is a factory shot) has two drain holes in the keel, one aft of the middle seat and one forward of it, each one with a metal plug that screws in to close the hole. So any water that gets into the boat drains right out when it's in its cradle. I assumed this was a standard feature in this type of dinghy, but perhaps Montgomery was a cut above the rest. (Actually, I've been told that it is.)

PS-- Ours has a dagger board as opposed to a leeboard.
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Old 06-12-2015, 03:56 PM   #94
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One thing I like about our Whaler is that it is self bailing, in that there is a drain in the center where the cathedral hull "peaks". So when it is in the water, say tied off to the swim platform, it can self drain. And also that plug is much easier to access than the transom plug when it is in the cradle. It is right at the foot of the driver, so you get reminded real quick when you forget about putting it back in before getting on board, as the extra weight of a heavy person will cause some water to bubble up when you step in.

We have found this a very nice, often used feature. Among other things, I can wash and scrub out the boat while it's in the water.
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Old 06-12-2015, 05:02 PM   #95
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That's interesting as our Whaler has a transom drain plug and a drain plug in the bow area. I'm not sure if it would self drain if I left a plug out but I could try. My current practice is to put it in it's cradle if we are not using it. I remove the transom plug and wrap it in the cord of the davit control so I can't forget to reinstall it when I launch it again.

Once I left it in the water overnight and we had a rainstorm. She accumulated a lot of water, so much that if I climbed in on the transom end, the transom nearly went under water. I used a hand bilge pump to bail her out. I will try pulling the plug to see if she will self bail. I'll use a hose to put water in and see what happens. She has a 25 hp 4-stroke so the transom bears quite a bit of weight. Howard
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Old 06-12-2015, 05:20 PM   #96
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I towed a 13' and now a 15' whaler behind me. I've tried to see if she would "equalize" and stay afloat with the plug out at the dock. I have a 50hp yamaha on it. I am certain, based on my observation, she would sink by the stern left unbailed. The bow might be bobbing at the surface in the end but the engine would be 15' down. I keep a small bilge pump in her and have had no problems
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Old 06-12-2015, 05:28 PM   #97
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Well that was my concern. At least my engine would only be 11' down.
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Old 06-12-2015, 06:08 PM   #98
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On my Whaler, a 2005 130 Sport the only plug I pull when it is in the water is the one in the middle. And to repeat, that is with no one in it. It tows like a dream BTW, including in pretty nasty conditions.
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Old 06-12-2015, 06:39 PM   #99
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The whalers I've had and do have are the older ones. 1987 - my 15' only has the drain in the aft bilge and then one in the forward anchor well and only serves to drain the well. Mine tows great too but I don't trust the self bailing to cover me offshore in the older model I have , so I engage a fixed small automatic bilge pump , just in case. As long as I'm moving forward the water seems to empty OK. At the dock, with the plug out I've had to abort the observation of flotation aft when the water was too close to top of transom. I had to stand on the bow to balance the weight and bail with a bucket to make it safe enough for me to go aft and put the plug in w/o my extra weight pushing her under. They are fun though!
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Old 06-12-2015, 07:36 PM   #100
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I would suggest that dinghy drains be equipped so that the water can be used for something else. It's fresh water, after all.

On Algae, I keep her scrupulously clean in the summer thunder-boomer weather. Her pump goes through a filter and then into the water tank. If I were larger (bigger boat) I'd have it pumped into a separate tank for other uses.

Aside: Algae is 7' long and a plain old fiberglass dink. To the seats is 50 gallons. Filled, she holds 100 gallons of water. That's a lot if you like showers as much as I do. Of course my hair is half-way down my back so washing the hair is important to my happiness quotient.

I'd tried to figure out a way to use a spigot of sorts with a hose fitting. Haven't quite moved that to the front burner. Yet.

Aside for Ready2Go: The tarp I have for my bow has a plastic thru-hull attached. Thus, when it rains, I can screw on a hose and fill the tank with all that water. Not sure if your set-up could do something similar but there you have it. An idea since you have nothing else to do.

Dinghy's have a lot of uses.
You could use a bilge pump. It could create a decent flow for a shower.
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