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Old 04-26-2014, 01:14 PM   #21
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I'm still wondering if anyone has explored rail?

I think I read of a company in Mexico that trucks across to just shy of the Yucatan...much shorter distance, less bridges permits, lower overall costs....but doesn't save as much time, wear and tear...just some $$$.

I'm going to research a bit myself..was just wondering if anyone knew off hand.??

..especially interested in why rail hasn't stepped in to yacht transport or hasn't advertised it....maybe too few intercontinental trips???
Doesn't fit into rail well. First containers/rail cars much better than open. When you go to open, width is an issue. But the bigger issue is they get put through a lot of shifting, wind, stop, start, overhanging limbs even. I've been in a facility set up just to empty, salvage and repack those cars. I observed many of them hauling lumber and they'd shifted so now all being unloaded, repacked on pallets, reloaded. Not for a boat.
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Old 04-26-2014, 01:34 PM   #22
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Hello everyone and thanks a lot for the responses. I am melroughwater's husband.

The boat is 45' long, 15' wide, and approx. 16' tall. I figured this would be good info to add since that will impact over-land shipping options.
Often shippers remove the bridge and load it separately. Just depends on the boat. If you haven't checked with Joule, I would.

The question of how long you'll be there and where next arose. There are some in your situation who buy quality older boats, maintain them well, resell them for the next move and come out much better than transporting when it's the distance you're talking about.

Let's assume you're paying $75,000 (Don't know the price of your boat so just picking a number). $30,000 to move it just can't make financial sense. Too many boats where you're going. Now you have $105,000 in a boat that after brokers fees you could sell for $68,000. If you haven't completed the purchase, I'd just not do it. If that boat was already located in Rhode Island would you pay that extra $30,000? Just seems unlikely. In fact the East Coast market is often lower than California, just you don't see CHB's on the East Coast.

If you already owned the boat, I'd probably be advising to sell or at least strongly consider it. You're like military families with houses. Same situation except they can't move theirs so most rent.
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Old 04-26-2014, 01:47 PM   #23
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Thank you for all of your posts, it has given us a lot to think about and I've looked at some numbers to see if we are jumping in to buying a boat here in San Diego and then moving it cross country in a year is justified and makes sense. Interested to hear your thoughts and am grateful for your previous input.
Our rent is $2500 a month here, so $30,000 a year for a small house that we walk away from when we leave. Our added bills of cable, gas, electric, etc. are another $500 a month approximately, so another $6,000 a year. We do move every 2-3 years to rentals that we walk away from at the end without owning anything. The boat that we are buying, the slip at the marina, all estimated expenses, puts our monthly payments for loan and bills, if we liveaboard, which we plan, at about $1,500 less per month. That is a huge savings and we own something that we can take with us. The cost to ship it is $25,000 is a lot, but we are reimbursed a portion from the military because it will be the only thing we are moving. The savings that we have every month can go toward the balance of the shipping and then we have a home in RI when we get there and can continue to live at a lower expense.
Based on your advice, I've got bids out for cross country by land, captains to take her on her belly, and trailer transport to Houston and then we can take her on her own belly to RI. My father-in-law is a captain and is looking to help, but don't want to overburden him with a LONG trip from ocean to ocean.
Has anyone here moved a boat a distance?
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:30 PM   #24
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Thank you for all of your posts, it has given us a lot to think about and I've looked at some numbers to see if we are jumping in to buying a boat here in San Diego and then moving it cross country in a year is justified and makes sense. Interested to hear your thoughts and am grateful for your previous input.
Our rent is $2500 a month here, so $30,000 a year for a small house that we walk away from when we leave. Our added bills of cable, gas, electric, etc. are another $500 a month approximately, so another $6,000 a year. We do move every 2-3 years to rentals that we walk away from at the end without owning anything. The boat that we are buying, the slip at the marina, all estimated expenses, puts our monthly payments for loan and bills, if we liveaboard, which we plan, at about $1,500 less per month. That is a huge savings and we own something that we can take with us. The cost to ship it is $25,000 is a lot, but we are reimbursed a portion from the military because it will be the only thing we are moving. The savings that we have every month can go toward the balance of the shipping and then we have a home in RI when we get there and can continue to live at a lower expense.
Based on your advice, I've got bids out for cross country by land, captains to take her on her belly, and trailer transport to Houston and then we can take her on her own belly to RI. My father-in-law is a captain and is looking to help, but don't want to overburden him with a LONG trip from ocean to ocean.
Has anyone here moved a boat a distance?
Great analysis. Didn't realize how long you had left there before the move. Thought the move was soon, this summer.

Father-in-law changes things a bit as he could accompany delivery captains.

One more option to toss out to you. Move by ship. You would have to take it south and pick it up at one of their ports. But SevenStar would deliver from Ensenada to Palm Beach. Dockwise did go from Costa Rica to Rhode Island but I don't know now. That may be more expensive than land. At one time it was about the same.
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:47 PM   #25
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Thanks BandB, forgot about that! Our broker has a quote request out with 7star. That may be our best way to go and father-in-law lives near Palm Beach.
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Old 04-26-2014, 03:08 PM   #26
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Just a note it gets COLD and snows in Newport RI. Can you use the Navy's Marina? Most private marinas close for the winter
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Old 04-26-2014, 03:18 PM   #27
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Thanks BandB, forgot about that! Our broker has a quote request out with 7star. That may be our best way to go and father-in-law lives near Palm Beach.
Hopefully it's reasonable. I got a quote from them recently that seemed excessive. Since their acquisition of Dockwise it seems their rates have risen a good bit. But then often brokers and builders can get rates negotiated a bit. I was quoted $105,000 on an 85' from Vancouver, BC to Palm Beach. I'm guessing you'll come in around $30,000 - $40,000. Will be interesting to see.
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Old 04-27-2014, 06:33 AM   #28
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At the same price , or loads lower here in Fl , you might find a similar boat , or better with out the moving hassles .

Most boats are NOT set up for full time real winter liveaboard .

It will run between $4K and $10K to have a heating plant installed , and even then you will need a plan B for when the marina electric is down for a week or two.

Find a marina that will have liveaboards in the area you are transferring to FIRST!
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Old 04-27-2014, 07:30 AM   #29
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We plan to liveaboard. My husband is in the Navy and in the same week we put an offer on the boat, he got verbal orders to Newport, Rhode Island for next summer!

You might benefit from reviewing northeast coast liveaboard threads here and on cruisersforum (sister site). Liveaboard-friendly marinas, winter-time pump-out (and/or sewage treatment capabilities), and heat would be big issues. Around here, I think most of the military marinas close for the winter. Are there are any NDZs in that neck of the woods? And so forth...

If existing posts don't answer everything, you could always start a new thread...

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Old 04-27-2014, 10:16 PM   #30
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Breaking down the boat to a "trailer able" height is a massive pain.... And expensive.
Only way to go is to SHIP it on a Yacht Transportation Boat. I have used Dockwise Yacht Transportation. They have a giant ship that lowers itself, you drive your boat on, and they set up bunks underneath your boat. They then raise the ship and your boat is high and dry. They will pick up the boat in
Ensenada.
Probably around $20k or so.
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Old 04-27-2014, 10:38 PM   #31
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Breaking down the boat to a "trailer able" height is a massive pain.... And expensive.
Only way to go is to SHIP it on a Yacht Transportation Boat. I have used Dockwise Yacht Transportation. They have a giant ship that lowers itself, you drive your boat on, and they set up bunks underneath your boat. They then raise the ship and your boat is high and dry. They will pick up the boat in
Ensenada.
Probably around $20k or so.
Taras
SevenStar does Ensenada. DYT does Golfito, Costa Rica now. Their locations are reduced since the sale with only two ships. Also, with less competition price has risen.

As to breaking boats down to trailerable, it's not cheap but it's done all the time. The shipping companies have a lot of experience. That said, my preference would be ship if possible.
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:52 AM   #32
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If you consider shipping, contact Peters & May (check their website). they are worldwide yacht shippers, usually as deck cargo on scheduled runs. they should be able to get you from Ensenada to RI or at least pretty close. It can get fairly pricey probably around $40k or so for your boat. But, they are professional their cost is all inclusive, loading, unloading, cradle, insurance, etc. We used them from Fla to Seattle (actually Vancouver) and were very pleased with them.
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Old 04-28-2014, 06:54 AM   #33
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I think both the cost and the time estimates are totally unrealistic for the on water route. Plus, the wear and tear on the boat is significant. The half and half options seem a reasonable compromise. Truck part way, then find a way to move the boat yourself on the water to RI.
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:12 AM   #34
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On second thoughts, there are many boats for sale here on the East Coast (my own included!!). Why not discontinue the purchase? Agree to give up your deposit or better, negotiate an out where you pay part of the deposit. Unless you have conducted your inspection/sea trial satisfactorily it is often easy to stop the purchase without penalty. Even if the purchase has "closed" you might still be better off giving the boat back to the broker to sell, and start over in RI. May well be less costly to lose some money on the West Coast rather than lose more money shipping or moving the boat to the East Coast.
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:35 AM   #35
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One more time!! Another fact to consider relates to sales tax. Assuming you complete the sale on the W. Coast you need to be careful that you do not end up paying sales tax in CA. Presumably there is a window of opportunity to move the vessel out of state before you must pay the tax. There is no sales tax in RI. Savings in sales tax could be significant.
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Old 04-28-2014, 10:52 AM   #36
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One more time!! Another fact to consider relates to sales tax. Assuming you complete the sale on the W. Coast you need to be careful that you do not end up paying sales tax in CA. Presumably there is a window of opportunity to move the vessel out of state before you must pay the tax. There is no sales tax in RI. Savings in sales tax could be significant.
If he's going to use it for a year in California he'll have to pay taxes and register it there.
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Old 04-28-2014, 11:09 AM   #37
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I agree. I missed the fact that the move is not till next year!!
But perhaps still time to delay the purchase, look on the East Coast and avoid CA tax and transportation costs by buying/registering in RI. There are lots of boats for sale here!!
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:45 PM   #38
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There are lots of boats for sale here!!

Craigs list for fixer upper. Or Florida Mariner for local listings. might even try a broker here.

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Old 04-28-2014, 03:52 PM   #39
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Cape Codder mentioned cold in new England. You will need a de-icer to prevent the boat from getting iced in at the slip among other things. Yes, it is critical to find a marina that will accept live aboards in the area.
I was a broker in Connecticut for many years and at the marina where I worked it was about 150 feet from the nearest dock to running water in the winter and the boat owners had to pay for snow removal. Electricity was metered to pay for the de-icer and heat. The water will be too cold for reverse cycle air conditioning.
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Old 04-29-2014, 06:41 AM   #40
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>Why not discontinue the purchase?>

Most brokerage contracts have a loophole ,> subject to financing.<

No financing and your deposit comes back.

>You will need a de-icer to prevent the boat from getting iced in at the slip among other things. <

With 22 winters aboard mostly in the NE , there is no need for a deicer , freezing in the boat does no harm.

EXCEPT if it a wooden boat where the ice freezing in the cotton calking could get started from boat motion.

Sure icing may will chew a bit of bottom paint as the ice finally departs if you do not open the hole the boat sits in , bashing a 2x4 works well.

Oil paint drys slowly in cold , but iced in is a good time to refresh the stern art.
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