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Old 08-14-2017, 07:52 PM   #1
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Transatlantic cross in single thread Trawler

Was just looking online at some Selene trawlers in 40-50' range that have a 2500 mm range and are advertised as Transatlantic capable. But most of the ones I see are single screw.

There's no way in hell I'd go out into the middle of the ocean with a single engine! I'd be scared to even try with twin diesels.

I'm just wondering what the consensus is on that. Would you have to be a master mechanic with every imaginable spare part to even consider that? Or do people do this all the time?
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:00 PM   #2
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Welcome to the forum.

People do it all the time in well maintained Nordhavns and Selene's. To Bermuda, then the Azores, then Europe.

Others take the Northern route, NE, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland/Scotland.

Most of these models have "get home" secondaries.
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:03 PM   #3
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If I wanted to cross an ocean in anything less than about, oh say 500' or so it would have to have sails !
We have a 40ish foot Trawler that has a single engine and we like to think that if Europe is in the works, it will get there on a proper ship!
Having said that his, I've done 5 Newport to Bermuda races on 38' to 46' sailboats and I've been comfortable for the most part.
Always have a plan B
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:10 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigslick75093 View Post
Was just looking online at some Selene trawlers in 40-50' range that have a 2500 mm range and are advertised as Transatlantic capable. But most of the ones I see are single screw.

There's no way in hell I'd go out into the middle of the ocean with a single engine! I'd be scared to even try with twin diesels.

I'm just wondering what the consensus is on that. Would you have to be a master mechanic with every imaginable spare part to even consider that? Or do people do this all the time?
You may want to reach out to our friend Richard on Dauntless

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Old 08-14-2017, 08:13 PM   #5
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It's weird...even with twin screws, I only ever get nervous with engine issues when coming into the marina as I'm afraid to hit something Out in the middle of the ocean, I'm not sure it would bother me even on a single screw.

I'd have several spares for cooling pumps, fluids for several oil and coolant changes above and beyond what you would need for the trip, a plethora of fluids filters, air filters, a couple lift pumps or rebuild kits for said pumps, and a dozen or more feet of water line so you could reroute raw water cooling thru the engine if the engines cooling system fails. Maybe a spare section of exhaust hose or several rolls of duct tape to repair a burst exhaust run.

For me, the marine cooling stuff would give me worries more so then the engine itself. So keep whatever spares you think would allow you to keep it cool if something fails, with the emergency option of running thru raw sea water thru the block until you reached land.

To be honest, if you are thinking of a Selene in the 50 foot range AND plan to cross an ocean...a single engine repower should be a drop in the refit bucket. leave on your trip with a newly broken in engine and leave a lot of your worry on shore

My 2 cents, remember what you paid for them
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:21 PM   #6
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There is a video on youtube about a group of Nordhavn owners doing the first route Menzies said. I believe the smallest Nordy was a 48 footer. All of them came through with flying colors!


Cheers.


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Old 08-14-2017, 08:50 PM   #7
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Reading posts 1 & 3 illustrates that more than anything, after establishing ocean crossing capability, it comes down to an alternative/back up form of propulsion, be it a get home auxiliary or sails. Or if a sailboat is the choice, a good motor.
Personally, I favour something with twins, about 900ft long and 90000 tonnes.
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:56 PM   #8
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Aren't most merchant ships single engine?
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:02 PM   #9
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Aren't most merchant ships single engine?
What abut fishing boat (trawlers )?

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Old 08-14-2017, 09:07 PM   #10
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Transatlantic cross in single thread Trawler

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Originally Posted by Jeff F View Post
Aren't most merchant ships single engine?


I was on a 660' gas tanker. Steam plant one screw. Spare 12" shaft on board hanging from the ER ceiling!
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:11 PM   #11
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Well, I can say that there's an augment to know the "risk vs benefit" with any cursing venture. If it's a boat, plane, RV of just a car.

For the most part, single engine stuff statistically does pretty well, IF maintained well and has equipment that can get the job done.

My background is aviation and I've been thru the single vs. twin debate forever, and not a heck of a lot different with boats.

For me... I'm not crossing an ocean in a single or twin plane or boat... no matter what. Just not my thing. Not a safety thing.... just too boring.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:17 PM   #12
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Well, I can say that there's an augment to know the "risk vs benefit" with any cursing venture. If it's a boat, plane, RV of just a car.

For the most part, single engine stuff statistically does pretty well, IF maintained well and has equipment that can get the job done.

My background is aviation and I've been thru the single vs. twin debate forever, and not a heck of a lot different with boats.

For me... I'm not crossing an ocean in a single or twin plane or boat... no matter what. Just not my thing. Not a safety thing.... just too boring.
Was that bolded intentional???
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:17 PM   #13
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Over the past 6 years,acquaintances Mark & Jennifer Ullman have put over 40,000 miles on their Nordhavn 46. Two transatlantics, recently 21+ days from Galapagos to Marquesas. Single engine...
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:18 PM   #14
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Was that bolded intentional???:roll eyes:

got me.....
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:17 PM   #15
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There are also plenty of single engine vessels that got into serious trouble or were lost when their power plant failed at inopportune moments.
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:38 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigslick75093 View Post
Was just looking online at some Selene trawlers in 40-50' range that have a 2500 mm range and are advertised as Transatlantic capable. But most of the ones I see are single screw.

There's no way in hell I'd go out into the middle of the ocean with a single engine! I'd be scared to even try with twin diesels.

I'm just wondering what the consensus is on that. Would you have to be a master mechanic with every imaginable spare part to even consider that? Or do people do this all the time?
As you can see from the posts, there is no consensus.

It mostly depends on whether the person wants to do an ocean crossing or not, and how they weigh up the risks.

Given the opportunity, I'd love to do it in a boat I trusted. Single or twins, it wouldn't matter, as long as I knew the history of the engine(s).
Some sort of stabilization would be nice, though. Either sails, paravanes, or active fins.

Some suggested they would get too bored.
I'd get bored doing a crossing on a cruise ship, but never on a 40 foot boat when my life dependant on keeping things running sweet.
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:39 PM   #17
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There are also plenty of single engine vessels that got into serious trouble or were lost when their power plant failed at inopportune moments.
You mean small boats in the middle of the ocean?
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Old 08-15-2017, 05:01 AM   #18
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There is a video on youtube about a group of Nordhavn owners doing the first route Menzies said. I believe the smallest Nordy was a 48 footer. All of them came through with flying colors!


Cheers.


H.
I believe the 2004 Atlantic Rally included a 40 foot Nordhavn.
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Old 08-15-2017, 05:07 AM   #19
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This thread made me think. I am aware of a good number of single engine sub 50 footers that have crossed an ocean. I am sure that it has been done by a twin engine boat. I think a Grand Banks went to Hawaii having removed one prop. Anyone know of twin engine ocean crossings in the sub 50 foot category?
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:21 AM   #20
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This thread made me think. I am aware of a good number of single engine sub 50 footers that have crossed an ocean. I am sure that it has been done by a twin engine boat. I think a Grand Banks went to Hawaii having removed one prop. Anyone know of twin engine ocean crossings in the sub 50 foot category?
Probably not, because generally they do not have the range to make a ocean crossing.

If we look at specific models there are actually very few production boats with twin engines in the sub 50' size that have the endurance.

Hatteras 48 LRC comes to mind, but even there I'm iffy on that boats capability for a pacific crossing.
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