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Old 02-22-2019, 12:11 AM   #1
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Trans-Atlantic in a semi-disp hull?? Yes

Is this Elling E6 hull unique or have other builders in the past built a SD hull before that is capable of crossing oceans?

Interesting design. I can't imagine crossing the Atlantic in a semi-displacement rig....Even if it is 65' by 18' and fully stabilized, I think I'd be more trusting in an N43 that is 20 feet smaller. The Elling is BEAUTIFUL though.



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Old 02-22-2019, 12:38 AM   #2
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I'd trust it.

This is a very different beast that the typical top heavy SD trawler. Self righting, I believe.

Having been in fairly big seas in a fully loaded expedition sea kayak with most of the weight near or below the waterline, I can see this boat behaving in much the same way (those who have done it will know how stable a fully loaded wide beam sea kayak really is) especially if it had a gyro.
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Old 02-22-2019, 03:04 AM   #3
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I think "transatlantic capability" is kind of a meaningless term. It would be more helpful to say "this boat can handle 20 foot seas, and 50 kt winds" or something like that, but even that isn't all that specific. Consider the two boats pictured below; the small boat crossed the Atlantic, and the Cruise ship sank while it was anchored.
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Old 02-22-2019, 05:47 AM   #4
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If it can carry enough fuel, most any hull shape could go the distance.

The hassle is a storm with waves breaking on deck or against the on deck structures.

The chance of a storm wave tossing the boat from crest into a trough is why ocean scantlings differ from along shore
construction.

The reason offshore boats cost so much more.
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Old 02-22-2019, 06:36 AM   #5
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Hull type by itself is no real measure of seaworthiness.
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Old 02-22-2019, 06:56 AM   #6
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The E4 is on my short list, FD SD, no measure of seaworthiness, most rescue/ pilot boats are SD...A couple of E 4 ‘s crossed into Russia years ago with bladders on deck...Elling is a very safe seaworthy vessel..
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Old 02-22-2019, 07:39 AM   #7
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For an indication of SD seaworthiness, look no further than the CG training videos for the Columbia Bar.
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:15 AM   #8
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Impressive build quality

I took a good look at one two years ago. Definitely different from any US or asian boat I have been on in terms of layout and style but I didn't find anything remotely bad in terms of build quality. I think it may have been a E3 and the happy owners were moving up to bigger one.
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:52 AM   #9
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Rated CE Ocean Category A, by those who are working with a tad more information than we are: Elling E6 Yacht Specification | Elling Yachts
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Old 02-22-2019, 10:48 AM   #10
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Rated CE Ocean Category A, by those who are working with a tad more information than we are: Elling E6 Yacht Specification | Elling Yachts


That’s the way to judge it objectively.
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Old 02-22-2019, 10:51 AM   #11
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There are many semi-displacement hulls more than capable of handling very rough seas. The limitation many face is range, but just look at yachts like Westport and Hatteras and Heesen. Our Riva could cross but only has range of 200-250 nm.

Elling has good sea worthiness but not significantly more than some other boats in it's range, just more promoted. Sort of like Nordhavn, with sea worthiness, but no more capable of ocean crossing than several other brands in it's size range.

The self righting is half impressive and half a gimmick. Ideal controlled conditions. Doesn't mean if you flip in the middle of the ocean, you're going to self right and just continue on your merry way but does mean the boat has excellent stability and ability to handle waves.

Many semi-displacement boats handle rough seas as well or better than comparable full displacement. A couple of days ago when the Miami show let out, all the Viking and Hatteras boats were moving north. They were all running offshore in 6' of seas at 25-30 knots sort of in a SF caravan. There was a total group of about 8 or 9 boats ranging from the 45' Hatteras to the 90'. Oh, must add too that the 45' Hatteras and the 41' Cabo both handle rough seas incredibly well from all the reports I get.

We intend to one day cross the Atlantic and the Pacific and it will be in a much larger semi-displacement or better called a semi-planing boat capable of 25 knots, cruises at 20 knots, but the crossing will have to be at 10-15 knots due to range.

Most of the "trawler" owners I see on the East Coast do the majority of their cruising in the ICW. Many consider 3' or 4' waves to be bad. That has far more to do with their tolerance for rough seas than it does with the capabilities of the boats. Staying inside also is based on their lack of speed making outside runs more time consuming rather than less. Then as to comfort, they're unable to adjust speed to achieve more comfortable matches to the wave heights and periods. They may struggle with aft or stern waves while a semi-displacement would just speed up slightly to eliminate the issue.

All these labels of displacement and semi-displacement and trawler and fast trawler and planing and semi-planing really say nothing about sea worthiness.
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Old 02-22-2019, 12:20 PM   #12
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Category A – Ocean: covers largely self-sufficient boats designed for extended voyages with winds of over Beaufort Force 8 (over 40 knots), and significant wave heights above 13 feet, but excluding abnormal conditions such as hurricanes.

Category B – Offshore: includes boats operating offshore with winds to 40 knots and significant seas to 13 feet.

Category C – Inshore: is for boats operating in coastal waters and large bays and lakes with winds to Force 6, up to 27 knots, and significant seas 7 feet high.

Category D – Inland or sheltered coastal waters: is for boats in small lakes and rivers with winds to Force 4 and significant wave heights to 18 inches.
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Old 02-22-2019, 12:27 PM   #13
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Rated CE Ocean Category A, by those who are working with a tad more information than we are: Elling E6 Yacht Specification | Elling Yachts
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Nice vessels in many respects. Some years ago we seriously looked at one. On the minus side was cramped machinery space, designed like a sailboat motor arrangement as I recall.

I don't totally agree with BB though on the roll over being primarily a marketing ploy. Yes it was done under controlled conditions. But more importantly doors, hatches, Windows, vents and through hulls got a good water integrity test.
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Old 02-22-2019, 12:47 PM   #14
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I don't totally agree with BB though on the roll over being primarily a marketing ploy. Yes it was done under controlled conditions. But more importantly doors, hatches, Windows, vents and through hulls got a good water integrity test.
Well, you don't agree with something I never said. I didn't say it was primarily a marketing ploy. I said it was half impressive, half gimmick. I'd put it in the same framework as the unsinkable Boston Whaler. It wasn't the first or only unsinkable boat, but the first to sell tons of boats by marketing it.

The Elling boats are impressive, but the rollover test doesn't means they are substantially safer at sea than many other boats of similar designs. I'll stick to my "half impressive, half a gimmick" but I did not say "primarily a marketing ploy." I would say a very good marketing demonstration based on a unique ability to perform in a certain test which indicated an ability to right itself in certain conditions.

If you want to argue with anything I actually say, feel free to do so, but please don't attribute statements to me that I just didn't make.
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Old 02-22-2019, 01:25 PM   #15
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I would have thought that ‘gimmick’ and ‘marketing ploy’ were synonymous. But maybe my English ain’t so good.
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:14 PM   #16
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Trans- Atlantic non-displacement hull:
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:17 PM   #17
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[QUOTE=BandB;743384] The self righting is half impressive and half a gimmick. [QUOTE]

You are correct. You did not say it was a marketing ploy, you said it was a gimmick. But seeing as how you're playing semantics please note I did not use quotation marks.
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:35 PM   #18
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I can't imagine crossing the Atlantic in a semi-displacement rig....Even if it is 65' by 18' and fully stabilized,
You have pretty described Tony's Fleming 65 "Venture" which has crossed many oceans.
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:44 PM   #19
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I know of at least one guy who took a Fleming 55 across, there use to be a somewhat humorous article by him on the Fleming website.
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:48 PM   #20
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I would have thought that ‘gimmick’ and ‘marketing ploy’ were synonymous. But maybe my English ain’t so good.
But I didn't say that it was primarily a gimmick. I said half impressive, half gimmick. That is not saying it is primarily a gimmick or primarily a marketing ploy. That's not semantics. It's the difference between what was said and how it was interpreted.

Whether quotation marks were used or not, it was attributed to me.

I will reiterate, I am not saying, have never said, it was primarily a marketing ploy or primarily a gimmick. I've said it had some impressiveness to it, some legitimacy as a feature and it had some gimmickry to it or marketing strategy.

I've also said Elling builds fine boats for rough seas and conditions, but they're not the only semi-displacement boat that can handle such conditions.

I'm far more impressed by those who have been on them in rough seas and commented as to how well they performed than I am by the self righting exhibition. I've heard nothing but good things about them and to me those are far more indicative of ability to cross oceans than is the righting test.
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