Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-19-2016, 02:16 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: SoCal
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Long Time Dead
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 55
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 67
Towing Dinghy

We are traveling in the inside of SE Alaska in a Nordhavn 55. We've been towing our dinghy occasionally but the dinghy manual (nautica) says to only tow short distances without their "tow package" add-on. I presume that the ring on the dinghy that we connect to can give way- although we are only capable of doing 8 knots.

Anyone have any feedback on whether we should worry about this towing setup? Sure is easier than using the davit twice a day.

Many thanks
__________________
Advertisement

bigpoppop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 05:06 AM   #2
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,883
"Sure is easier than using the davit twice a day."

The davit hoist should be the work of a 10 year old.

Why does yours require effort?
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 05:13 AM   #3
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,656
Side issue, does your insurance policy cover your dinghy while you are towing it? Do you remove the outboard from the dinghy or tow it with the outboard in the up position.

Towing dinghies is common where we boat and at least one dinghy is lost each year. Most however remove the outboard.
__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 05:19 AM   #4
Guru
 
City: Northport
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 644
I have towed 3 Nautica's over the past 10+ years all of which were towed most of the distance at 17 knots or so. About 500 miles of towing each season across the boats which varied between 19' and 24' with no issues. The tow points on the RIBS were very robust but I do not know if they had the 'tow package' and the manuals did not mention anything about towing requirements.
smitty477 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 07:58 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 465
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Do you remove the outboard from the dinghy or tow it with the outboard in the up position.
On my last boat if I towed the dinghy it was always with the motor down, but unlocked.
I could adjust the rope in and out until it had bugger all load on it I guess sort of surfing but only just.

Motor up the dinghy surfed down waves, stalled in the back of the wave in front and veered sideways before the rope snapped taught which didnt feel to good.

Motor down but unlocked created enough drag to keep it back but if speed picked up the motor could start to kick up taking load off of outboard yet still create enough drag to keep it back.
Simi 60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 08:36 AM   #6
Guru
 
hmason's Avatar
 
City: Westport, CT
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Magic
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 46 Europa
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,765
We lift our dinghy on board most of the time. If we are only going a short distance we tow it (maybe 5 miles or less). I find towing quite easy however, at least for me, it's very distracting. I find myself constantly looking back to check on it. At times I forget to look back then whip my head around expecting it to be gone. It's always there but it worries me anyway.

You might say I'm a towing wuss but for me it's just not worth the constant angst. And we do have a serious towing bridle.
__________________
Howard
Magic, 1996 Grand Banks Europa
Westport, CT and Stuart, FL
hmason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 08:43 AM   #7
Guru
 
hmason's Avatar
 
City: Westport, CT
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Magic
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 46 Europa
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,765
I think towing with the motor down would cause the prop to spin constantly. Is that damaging to the outboard or gear train?
__________________
Howard
Magic, 1996 Grand Banks Europa
Westport, CT and Stuart, FL
hmason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 08:49 AM   #8
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 14,832
No more damaging than just running it...and even less so be a use there isn't nearly much torque being applied .

At least that's my understanding, maybe an outboard mech or engineer can verify.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 08:56 AM   #9
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,463
Best practice is usually just have the skeg of the motor in the water and avoid the drag introduced by the prop. Helps keep the thing from yawing around. A lot of variables in dinghy design, and how fast it's being towed, so hard to comment on what's best for a particular set-up. I'm guessing that the OP's manufacturer had that provision for his specific model for a reason, beyond just selling towing packages.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 09:08 AM   #10
Guru
 
City: Northport
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 644
Below is a pic of the 19" Nautica at about 17 knots and 85 feet behind the towing boat. Always have towed with the engine(s) up and only had issues when towing boats below the 15' length size as they would 'wag' more than I would have liked.

smitty477 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 09:28 AM   #11
Veteran Member
 
City: SoCal
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Long Time Dead
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 55
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 67
We not remove the motor- and we've always raised the motor- at 8 knots it seems like a light load on the entire setup
bigpoppop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 09:37 AM   #12
Guru
 
refugio's Avatar
 
City: Meydenbauer Bay Yacht Club
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Refugio
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,132
Towed a 13.5' Nautica wide-body with 50hp Yamaha from the bow eye (had towing points but didn't use them). Engine up but skeg in water. Floating Spectra line with large snubber. Second small line off aft starboard cleat to snug up when transiting locks. Zero issues and loved this setup, but got tired of YC rules about tenders and sold it. Currently rethinking tender situation.
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTrawler Forum1468939009.818452.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	63.4 KB
ID:	54360


Keith
__________________
Keith
refugio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 09:45 AM   #13
Veteran Member
 
City: Beaufort, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Mikelson 43
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmason View Post
I think towing with the motor down would cause the prop to spin constantly. Is that damaging to the outboard or gear train?
No, it's not damaging to the outboard. It doesn't turn anything except the gears in the lower unit. The water pump doesn't turn unless the engine is turning over.
ABfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 09:54 AM   #14
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 14,832
Be careful towing some boats with the motors up, especially 4 strokes on narrower boats.

They are very unstable...even if you don't think so. I have responded to a dozen or so that flipped at the dock just sitting there with a bit of water in them and a small wake going by.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 10:26 AM   #15
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 4,572
Great question. I have yet to tow my current dinghy behind my new boat. I towed a rib behind my sailboat all the time, but always took the motor off. Now the motor has to stay on but I am a bit nervous about towing it. I will likely try it next week. I will use some leisure time to make a tow line.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 10:39 AM   #16
Guru
 
Mule's Avatar
 
City: Fort Pierce
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Florita Ann
Vessel Model: 1982 Present
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,715
I am following this string carefully. I intend to tow my Dinghy behind my 7 knot trawler. A 17 ft Boston Whaler Montauk. Comments, warnings, tips?
Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 11:14 AM   #17
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,463
My 2005 13' Whaler 130 Sport tows like dream. Would expect the 17 Montauk to be even better. Miami Cordage or Rope Inc in Ft. Lauderdale make excellent bridles if you want to go deluxe, but their sites have good advice on how one should be rigged. The "second wave back" rule for length holds true, a little experimentation to suit.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 11:31 AM   #18
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,520
If it is stable towing with the motor up, that would be preferred. Probably no harm with prop spinning in neutral, but there usually is no bearing in play between the prop shaft clutch dog spline area and the fwd face of the reverse gear. Not much pulling force from the windmilling prop, but there is some. Most gearcases I've been in do not have any thrust bearing provision for this type loading. Nowhere in normal ops are those surfaces loaded in that direction with relative motion between the parts.

But folks do it all the time with no apparent problems. But also gearcases poop all the time for no apparent reason!!
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 11:45 AM   #19
Guru
 
cardude01's Avatar
 
City: Victoria TX
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bijou
Vessel Model: 2008 Island Packet steadysailer
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,805
I towed my 10' West Marine RIB across the Gulf from Marco Island to Key West when it was fairly rough, and after experimenting with countless arrangements, I found it did best with the 15hp Johnson in the up position but with the skeg in the water, and the boat positioned very close to my boat just behind my wake. That seemed to keep good tension on the tow line so the dingy didn't wander around too much, and it was the calmest spot.
cardude01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 11:54 AM   #20
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 14,832
My biggest concerns for towing whalers were flipping the smaller ones and taking water over the bow with all of the low freeboard ones.

The much older ones had crappy, non-stainless towing eyes that break easily sometimes so using custom towing eyes are a good idea if the Whaler is worth anything.
__________________

psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012