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Old 07-19-2016, 11:56 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by cardude01 View Post
I towed my 10' West Marine RIB across the Gulf from Marco Island to Key West when it was fairly rough, and after experimenting with countless arrangements, I found it did best with the 15hp Johnson in the up position but with the skeg in the water, and the boat positioned very close to my boat just behind my wake. That seemed to keep good tension on the tow line so the dingy didn't wander around too much, and it was the calmest spot.
Smaller Ribs do react and ride very different from the pack.

In tight seems to work and having one overrun you is not as a big deal as a large, hard hulled dingy.
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Old 07-19-2016, 03:20 PM   #22
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We live aboard and cruise full time, with a dog so our dinghy is raised and lowered a hundred times a year. In 2500 hours of cruising we have towed only 1 hour. We chose not to tow our dinghy. I worked for Zodiac Avon and know of a lot of dinghies that have flipped. We have two painters on our dinghy. If a squall is approaching our anchorage we ti one painter to each side of the transom. That keeps dinghy close and centered so it is less likely to go airborn. If towing a dinghy in open waters, consider this story. The sea as school of hard knocks | Soundings Online
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Old 07-19-2016, 03:40 PM   #23
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My biggest concerns for towing whalers were flipping the smaller ones and taking water over the bow with all of the low freeboard ones.

The much older ones had crappy, non-stainless towing eyes that break easily sometimes so using custom towing eyes are a good idea if the Whaler is worth anything.
As with most issues here best to reveal and be specific as to model and year of the item in question. When our davit system was being rebuilt or when headed to a dock with a starboard-side tie (dinghy lowered from starboard side) we towed our afore specified Whaler a lot in open water and poor sea conditions. I too was paranoid the first time or two but it took anything thrown at it with aplomb. Never remotely close to a flipping or taking on water. Positioning certainly played a role, having the skeg down just right helped and perhaps the height to the stern cleats on the Hatteras played a role though it was typically 125 feet in back of the mothership.
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Old 07-19-2016, 03:58 PM   #24
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Well...feel free to be specific..I used the term low freeboard whalers...if you own one you know which ones I mean. I have towed many different sizes and models.

And it's not just whalers...if you have towed a lot, low freeboard anything can get dicey in certain conditions.

Sure, adjustments help, but at some point small cresting waves can put a lot of water aboard pretty quickly....and that's never good.

Plus the older 13s with 20 plus hp four strokes tilted up can get pretty unstable with a stiff wind off the bow, wakes and chop.
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Old 07-19-2016, 06:26 PM   #25
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It depends. With any decision like this, it's a matter of assessing the risk.

How robust are your tow points and tow line?
How much traffic?
What are the sea conditions? (Present & potential)

When conditions change - re-assess.

I lost my dinghy a few months ago when the swell picked up and the wave interval changed. (I didn't re-assess)
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Old 07-19-2016, 06:49 PM   #26
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The original post was about Nautica RIBS but we do not know which size or type the poster was referring to. In my experience the Nautica's of 18' and up are very robust and will take heavier and more mixed seas than most of the boats that are doing the towing. Of course we still do not know which one he was looking to get feedback on so we cannot make a good connection for that feedback.
FWIW - over the many hours of towing the Nautica's in rougher seas we also often had a Zodiac YL-380 up on the boat deck - and that is where we would keep it in anything but completely smooth water. Just not a good RIB to be pulling around in anything but calm seas.
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Old 07-19-2016, 10:07 PM   #27
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Picked up one of these 2nd hand yesterday with a 15hp Suzuki , canopy, cushions and galv trailer all in mint condition for under $2k.

I hope it tows OK, though the davits should have no drama lifting it being around 140kg/310lb inc fuel and anchor.

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Old 07-20-2016, 12:03 AM   #28
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[QUOTE=refugio;461913] but got tired of YC rules about tenders and sold it. Currently rethinking tender situation.
Attachment 54360

What "issues" did a yacht club have with your tender?.. unless they didn't like it stored next to the boat in the water?

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Old 07-20-2016, 06:56 AM   #29
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Wow, lotta good info..thanks guys.
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Old 07-20-2016, 08:02 AM   #30
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Simi 60. I like your tinny, but what do you do for gunwale guard?
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Old 07-20-2016, 08:11 AM   #31
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Simi 60. I like your tinny, but what do you do for gunwale guard?
My question as well.
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Old 07-20-2016, 08:30 AM   #32
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Quote:
Well...feel free to be specific..I used the term low freeboard whalers...if you own one you know which ones I mean. I have towed many different sizes and models.

And it's not just whalers...if you have towed a lot, low freeboard anything can get dicey in certain conditions.

Sure, adjustments help, but at some point small cresting waves can put a lot of water aboard pretty quickly....and that's never good.

Plus the older 13s with 20 plus hp four strokes tilted up can get pretty unstable with a stiff wind off the bow, wakes and chop.
Which is where the "skeg in the water" practice comes in.

I did specify my Whaler model and year, see post #17, and there is a picture of it in my avatar. Here is another:



Not sure where that fits on your freeboard scale, but I always have felt it was "low".
Perhaps you are towing them from a point low to the water? Or from cleats on the Whaler's gunnel rather than the towing eye? or both?

Back to the OP, the Nauticas I've seen are a more deep V hull vs my BW. I'd think they would track even better. I know they ride better in short chop.
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Old 07-20-2016, 11:57 AM   #33
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George. Nice picture of Cape Lookout. When towing a Whaler (probably applies to any inflatable too) you can take the drain plug out and any accumulated spray will drain out. What many people who own whalers may not realize, is that if your whaler is in a slip and there is a heavy rainstorm approaching, pull the plug. After the rain there will be less water in the boat than if you had not pulled the plug. One fall in FL a tropical storm approached. I was away on a business trip. My wife was worried about the 15 foot whaler and wanted to get the trailer and drive to the county ramp to haul it. I told her to just pull the plug and leave it alone. the storm dumped 5 inches of rain I came back home 3 days later there was less than an inch of water in the boat.
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Old 07-20-2016, 12:30 PM   #34
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I towed. 24' Nautica with a 250 Yamaha from FL to Costa Rica via the Panama Canal and back. Towed just fine.

But I did not, nor would I, tow it off the original factory bow eye. It had 2 specific tow points low on the bow.
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Old 07-20-2016, 01:38 PM   #35
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For those not real familiar with Whalers, here are pics of one with a low freeboard and a high freeboard.


Low freeboard, 1981 13' Sport....



and a high freeboard 2010 13' 130SuperSport....
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Old 07-20-2016, 01:55 PM   #36
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I believe in addition to whalers, Carolina and Sundance skiff are better off with the plugs out. There are plenty more too in all likelyhood, it behooves owners to know if their small boat is made to shed water with the garboard plugs out.

Unfortunately, some have large enough 4 stroke engines on them to sink those garboard holes enough to allow a lot of water in instead of out.
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Old 07-20-2016, 02:05 PM   #37
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Our 10'-4" Walker Bay RIB with 15 hp Honda towed very poorly on the one trial I did using a too-short painter. Speed about 8 kts, max. I've now got davits and am not likely to try it again.
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Old 07-20-2016, 02:26 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tadhana View Post
Simi 60. I like your tinny, but what do you do for gunwale guard?
I imagine I'll be getting on and off via the duckboard, which is S/S tube framed with thick EVA foam strip attached to the tube all the way around to protect the dinghy.

Its pretty flat bottomed over most of its length wit a vbow so should be pretty stable.
If not I could look at something like this for added stability and of course, topside protection if deciding I want to come alongside.
Kapten Boat Collars - Home

Or I could do something with this

Buoyancy Foam 50mm Sheet $22 56 PER Square Meter | eBay
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Old 07-20-2016, 03:05 PM   #39
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Our 10'-4" Walker Bay RIB with 15 hp Honda towed very poorly on the one trial I did using a too-short painter. Speed about 8 kts, max. I've now got davits and am not likely to try it again.

Good to know. I have the same rib with. Heavy Honda 8hp 4 stroke.
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Old 07-20-2016, 03:31 PM   #40
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I believe in addition to whalers, Carolina and Sundance skiff are better off with the plugs out. There are plenty more too in all likelyhood, it behooves owners to know if their small boat is made to shed water with the garboard plugs out.

Unfortunately, some have large enough 4 stroke engines on them to sink those garboard holes enough to allow a lot of water in instead of out.
Very true for Carolinas, Scott. Towing, like running, should keep the water level down to almost nothing. I leave the plugs out at the dock whenever possible and shift some weight forward to lift the scuppers above the water and still allow drainage aft. There's definitely a sweet spot and a fast incoming tide on the transom can sink the scuppers and create quite a puddle reaching the center console. I would not want anything heavier than the Yammy 90 that's currently hanging on her.
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