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Old 08-08-2019, 08:09 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Redhook98 View Post
Any benefit to towing over using the mast/boom/davit to lift it onto the roof? My 11-ft Gloucester Yachts sailboat is on the aft roof of my 49-ft MT. Using the boom and mast to lift on/off. Or that is the intention. I have not yet done it.
We really liked the option of doing either. We got into towing the boat more when settled down from full time cruising, and the slip we wanted was a starboard tie; that being the side the davit operated on. Our favorite activity was virtually weekly trips out to Cape Lookout Bight, in our opinion the greatest anchorage on the east coast, about an hour's trip from our slip in Morehead City NC. There is lots to do with a good dinghy there in the MHC/Beaufort area so we wanted readily at hand. So much so, we didn't include the Whaler in the sale of the Hatteras and still have it out there in Morehead at a dry stack.

Backing the big boat out past the finger pier and lowering or raising the Whaler was kind of a PITA; plus we were in a very active marina and sticking 15 feet or so out in the fairway while we were putzing with the Whaler was not popular. But again, entering and leaving the slip with the dink in the water was also it's own type of PITA... we just got to prefer that routine over the other. YMMV.

For longer voyages we absolutely preferred having the Whaler up on the boat deck. When transients, we always requested a port side tie because the odds were high that we'd want to launch the Whaler and explore the area.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:19 PM   #22
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As anyone who knows me can attest, I am NOT a fan of voluntarily putting thousands of my dollars worth of assets on a towline astern. And before I go further, I was the commanding officer of a 205-foot oceangoing tug, and I have tran-oceanic towing experience. But yes, I owned a 13-foot BW with a fifty HP OB which I towed behind my twin Ford-Lehman 120 equipped trawler only in the ICW for the 8-hour run from here to Apalachicola and back at the loss of about a half to three quarters of a knot to my normal cruise speed of 8. As delivery captain on a 60-foot Chris Roamer up the California coast, I was once forced to jettison a loose and dangling 13-ft BW (owner was aboard and it was his fault for not following my pre-departure recommendations) with attached 40 HP OB and tow it for several days in 14-foot seas. The wrangling in of this item for towing in those seas is sea story worthy of Jack London, but I digress. In those seas at a reasonable safe speed the darned thing made it, but it was an unwelcome worry while fighting all the other elements. Aboard a friend's 65-footer, we towed a 23-foot fishing across the Gulf Stream to and the Bahama Bank to Walker's Cay AFTER the smaller boat was delivered by trailer to us at Stuart before we began the crossing because we did not want the bother all the way down there from Panama City. Again, it was a PITA to keep track of it all the way across at night. When we saw a freighter coming at us, we'd worry even more about having to slow or mill about if something went wrong with our tow, but it made it OK too. The advice you have been given is all fine, and I am NOT advising one way or another, just passing on some experiences.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:01 PM   #23
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We towed our 13' Whaler all around the Bahamas for about 3 months last summer, while waiting for new O-rings for the crane. We don't like going in seas bigger than 3', and the Whaler towed fine in that. Rather than a bridle, we used two separate tow lines, one from each stern cleat to the towing eye on the Whaler. We started out towing it way back - 75' or so. Then we experimented with towing it in close - about 15' feet. Close works really well for us - just have to make sure it's not trying to climb the natural wave that comes off the stern of the trawler. If you can get it to ride on top or front of that wave, even better. (We go 7 - 7.5 kts.)
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:11 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by rgano View Post
As anyone who knows me can attest, I am NOT a fan of voluntarily putting thousands of my dollars worth of assets on a towline astern. And before I go further, I was the commanding officer of a 205-foot oceangoing tug, and I have tran-oceanic towing experience. But yes, I owned a 13-foot BW with a fifty HP OB which I towed behind my twin Ford-Lehman 120 equipped trawler only in the ICW for the 8-hour run from here to Apalachicola and back at the loss of about a half to three quarters of a knot to my normal cruise speed of 8. As delivery captain on a 60-foot Chris Roamer up the California coast, I was once forced to jettison a loose and dangling 13-ft BW (owner was aboard and it was his fault for not following my pre-departure recommendations) with attached 40 HP OB and tow it for several days in 14-foot seas. The wrangling in of this item for towing in those seas is sea story worthy of Jack London, but I digress. In those seas at a reasonable safe speed the darned thing made it, but it was an unwelcome worry while fighting all the other elements. Aboard a friend's 65-footer, we towed a 23-foot fishing across the Gulf Stream to and the Bahama Bank to Walker's Cay AFTER the smaller boat was delivered by trailer to us at Stuart before we began the crossing because we did not want the bother all the way down there from Panama City. Again, it was a PITA to keep track of it all the way across at night. When we saw a freighter coming at us, we'd worry even more about having to slow or mill about if something went wrong with our tow, but it made it OK too. The advice you have been given is all fine, and I am NOT advising one way or another, just passing on some experiences.
Rich, it just sounds like you don't like towing boats... is that the bottom line?
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:22 PM   #25
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Yep. We've done more damage to our boat lifting the dinghy off the deck in high winds than we ever did while towing it.
The only damage I ever did to a tender was while towing it and it took a week to figure it out! I towed our 11' Rendova RIB across the Georgia strait in rolly conditions from our Bayliner 4788 at 9-10kts. After this the dinghy was sluggish and then I noticed that it sat lower in the water. The pontoons however were as hard (inflated) as ever so I laboriously partially raised it to drain what I thought would be water between the inner and outer hulls, only a dribble came out - that was not the issue. It turned out that a forward facing seam had opened in a pontoon and the pressure of water from towing pushed water into the pontoon while maintaining pressure of air in that pontoon, so I had a pontoon 1/3 full of water and fully inflated. When the dinghy was not being towed of course the seam closed up and gave no evidence of any problem. It took me days to figure this out!!

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Old 08-12-2019, 08:40 PM   #26
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We have been towing our 11’ whaler for the last two seasons. Our routine is simple while towing. As others have stated weather and departure and arrival protocols need to be adhered to. We love having the little boat at the ready when ever we want.
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:40 PM   #27
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In the PNW some boaters tow fairly large tenders.

A friend tows a 20' Whaler outboard center console behind his 37' Tolly. Another a 18' Seaswirl center console outboard behind his 37' Bayliner. Both with T tops. Both cross Georgia, Johnstone and other straits with their tows.

I think they are nuts but they are experienced boaters and have experienced no problems.

We see many 45 to 60 foot boats towing 16 to 25 foot tenders.

We hear of many lost on the VHF.

It takes them considerable time to pull in the tender and secure it in preparation for docking or anchoring.

We choose to carry our tender on the boat deck, even for a short distance.
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:26 PM   #28
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Towing is like a or of things in life.


Either you do it or not...sometimes because of your own or others experiences, whether you THINK it's worth it or not, whatever.


But one person's experience or feeling should not guide one when there is ample reality that some tow and some don't for personal reasons, not absolute facts.
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:06 PM   #29
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Quote:
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Good morning,
I am seeking input on towing a 13' whaler as our dinghy. I have a 10' rib we lift on the stern davits but wanted to tow a 13 whaler. I am concerned about towing it. Do any fellow trawlers tow a 13' whaler or similar?
I do not have a crane on my trawler and just have a concern about foul weather and having it towed astern.
I appreciate all feedback
John

I have pulled my 16.5' Egret (behind 46' GB CL) from Jax to the Bahamas and the Keys more than a few times. Have used a bridle and never had any problems at all. Also have pulled my son-in- law's 20 Hurricane to the Bahamas and the Keys as well as to Tortugas. No problems and I've even pulled from the existing bow ring (for trailer).
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:28 PM   #30
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Friends who ventured off into the South Pacific aboard their ketch were towing their inflatable one time and one day found an inch or two perfectly circular hole in it.

Give up?

Cookie cutter shark. True story.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:02 AM   #31
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We also tow a 13' Whaler, with a 40 hp motor.

We tow it on an nylon bridle and a 5/8" polypropylene line 75' long. We have had no issues towing it although we nave not experienced this in challenging weather.

For anchoring and tying side-to a dock we tie up the Whaler "on the hip" as shown in the photographs below. Tied-up in this fashion allows to travel at idle speed and manoeuvre without issue.

We also board and un-board from the tender in that position via the mother ship's swim platform.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:35 AM   #32
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Gilberto, I see you have the same model of Whaler we do.

One thing I don't recall mentioning in my posts on this thread is that we found it helpful to lower the motor's skeg into the water just a bit, but not enough to submerge a part of the propellor; this helps tracking a lot.

At anchor we let the small boat out well behind the swim platform as otherwise it tended to bang into the big boat in certain conditions. Since the two boats were never in synch with each other in reaction to waves, no combination of fenders we came up with could prevent this.

By the way there are pads in the port and starboard forward corners on which you can mount cleats, which we did and find them very handy. The diagram for the spots of the deck that had backing pads used to be available online. I think I may have a copy somewhere in the cyber archives.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:52 AM   #33
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I tow a 10 foot RIB at on plane at 18kts. It just glides happily along. It is a West Marine 310 using a West Marine Bridle....so Bridle was made for that boat.
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Old 08-13-2019, 09:33 AM   #34
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Nice boat! That's the thing. Once you get out there and start towing it, you figure out ways to make it work!
Thanks!
We boat a large inland lake, and go in and out of lots of marinas, and long, narrow coves... some that go back a mile plus. Having the ability to do 360 deg. twists, back up, etc... without worrying about the tow is SO nice!

I first came up with this general rigging idea back in the early 90' when I was wanting to tow a jet ski by 26' ski boat long distances without it bouncing/submarine-ing all over the place. It worked great, but I was only using pvc sched. 40 pipe. But the proof-of-concept was there.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:10 AM   #35
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Most here are talking about towing at greater speed than I expect from your boat. You are most likely going to cruise at 7 to 8 knots, so won't be making the wave that would have you tow with a long painter. A short painter is so much less trouble. Your short painter should never be long enough to reach from the bow of the tow to your props and back up to the stern cleat on the big boat. At that length, controlling the position of the tow while docking will consist of changing its painter from the stern cleat to midships and tying off the stern of the tow to the stern of the big boat. This positioning also works for anchoring (see my avatar) and for boarding from the swimgrid. If your painter is measured correctly, all you need to do for either fastening position is to properly attach the eye of the painter and the bow of the tow will behave.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:24 AM   #36
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Some hang short chain from the transom of the tender during towing to track better.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:37 AM   #37
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I towed a RIB behind a 40' sailboat all over the Eastern Caribbean. Here's what I learned:

It takes some experimenting to get the tow line the right length. Easier in a powerboat because you have a typical cruising speed, where the stern wave is consistent.

I used an oversized poly line...it floats and isn't likely to foul your prop.

Coming into a marina, I just went into neutral and hauled the tender in to the "hip" of the big boat. Which side depended on how the harbormaster wanted me tied to the pier.

The advantage was that if we pulled into a cove, we could jump in the tender and go snorkle, run to shore, etc. very easily. If I were doing a two-day run or perhaps from Ft Lauderdale to Bahamas, I'd prefer it on deck but it wouldn't be that big a deal to tow it. Never lost it or had weather issues.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:38 AM   #38
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Thank you

Thank you all for the insightful feedback!
We are going to try towing this weekend. I have prepared a tow bridle and make all the necessary adjustments. I will post an update with photos of the adventure.
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:03 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
Friends who ventured off into the South Pacific aboard their ketch were towing their inflatable one time and one day found an inch or two perfectly circular hole in it.



Give up?



Cookie cutter shark. True story.


Just looked up cookie cutter sharks. NASTY little buggers! Looks like they’re the deep-ocean equivalent of horse flies (on steroids).
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Old Today, 11:50 AM   #40
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One experience that taught me to keep the 13’ Whaler tied alongside the boat while at anchor, and not parallel to the swim step. The event occurred a couple of years ago while at anchor near Hardy Island, B.C. The anchor dragged around 10 pm during a bit of a blow. I started the engines, hauled it in to reset and heard someone yell that I was headed toward a reef. Naturally I stopped the boat and began to back down, assuming the Whaler would handle being pushed sideways for a bit. Not so. The low freeboard and pressure from being pushed sideways while tied parallel to the stern promptly flipped it upside down. And of course the deck lines fouled one prop on the main boat in the pitch black night. The damn things do float as advertised, even upside down. Of course Merc 40s don’t care for being submerged in salt water.
Boat was a total loss. Now I always tie the (new) Whaler to the side of the boat when anchoring in case I need to move out in a hurry.
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