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Old 03-26-2016, 08:09 AM   #41
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"All this for a half day run across smooth water. What would I need for a couple months away?"

Mostly just time.

If an engine runs fine for a half day on smooth water, only a large change in conditions may matter.

Big waves can mix grunge and water in the fuel tank .

And can break loose unsecured stuff that will not be flying during a calm.

Simply operate any boat for a bunch of hours to see what problems happen.

You dont have to be in the middle of the ocean to find out how the boat functions in 40K.

Just bring a good anchor , should you need to wait out the bumpy water.
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Old 03-26-2016, 06:19 PM   #42
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Finally, I am back homed since the last night so I have a chance to answer.

First, I am impressed with the volume of answers - third page already! What an active bunch of guys you are, big thanks.

On Thursday morning we left Horseshoe Bay on the ferry to Nanaimo. My wife was the driver and I had my son and his friend as two crew members - mechanic and electrician. Then, after picking up all the ownership papers from a broker we physically took possession of the boat and waited for the pre-arranged mechanic to correct all mechanical deficiencies he had picked up at mechanical survey before:
- correct engine alignment and loose rear mounts,
- all the house batteries need replacement,
- anti-siphon loop leaking and missing on generator,
etc, etc..

By the time he finished it was almost 6pm, my wife was gone with the car and we decided to sleep at the dock and go in the morning.

We left 5 am! My first time conning my own not somebody else's boat; I love nights on the water and the Moon have decided to stop shining and the bridge instruments and gauges lights could not be turned on but the lower helm could not be turned off or dimmed. But by the time we hit Porlier Pass the daylight waked up.

We had a fantastic time ferrying the boat home - north of Thrasher Rock the NW picked up to 15 kn and created a nasty chop against the flood current and I was able to determine the boat is dry one behaving quite good for what it is.
Most impressive though is the engine; totally beyond my expectations, quiet, smooth and powerful. Great running engine I have to say.

By 2pm we were tied in my home marina which I visited first time in my life from the water side. The docking (my first on this type of boat too) was successful and any observer would not be able to tell how unexperienced I was although I had to cheat, I admit readily; I resorted to the bow thruster on one occasion for 2 seconds at least.

The boat is very good so far beyond my realistic expectations. the weather was cooperating too.
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Old 03-26-2016, 06:26 PM   #43
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Great to hear! Congratulations on the new boat, and the successful first voyage.

Pictures?
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Old 03-26-2016, 07:21 PM   #44
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Old 03-26-2016, 07:41 PM   #45
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Well, you didn't tell us you were traveling with your own mechanic and electrician. In that case, you don't need ANY tools. They'll bring their own.

Glad your trip was so memorable and enjoyable. Good times ahead!!
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Old 03-26-2016, 08:20 PM   #46
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WooooHoooo! Good job.
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Old 03-26-2016, 09:24 PM   #47
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The tools you should keep on your boat are directly related to your skill level and the spare parts you keep on your boat. There is little point in keeping spare parts if you don't have the tools to install them and there is little point in keeping tools on the boat if you don't know how to use them.

This includes electrical tools and meters.
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Old 03-26-2016, 09:35 PM   #48
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If a special tool is required for something on your boat...it is a good idea to have it aboard when traveling.

Even if you don't feel comfy using it, someone helping or a hired mechanic might use it without a special trip for it. May save some coins down the road...and so many things once sedn...are in the grasp of any handyman so you may use it in the future too.

Actually a decent set of tools isn't a bad idea. I can't begin to list all the times I helped someone quickly fix something while stopping by for a beer or just walking past. If I had to return to my boat for tools, it may not have gotten done right thdn, resulting in an expensive visit by a tech another time.

Same with spare parts.
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Old 03-27-2016, 02:33 PM   #49
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"Well, you didn't tell us you were traveling with your own mechanic and electrician."

Isn't that (plus swimmers) the norm for mfg. that lead a gaggle of their product across an ocean?
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Old 03-27-2016, 05:15 PM   #50
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I nominated them as such only when they came aboard.


My son is full of enthusiasm but the pinnacle of his experience is service work on his car. He was very useful nevertheless.


His friend could be called an electrician since he used to be a stereo installer. Vastly more knowledgeable then me for sure.


Happy Easter everybody!
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Old 03-27-2016, 05:36 PM   #51
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Sometimes the best tool to have is a small-stature work partner with tiny hands and very long arms.
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Old 03-27-2016, 05:58 PM   #52
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Regardless of how many tools you have on board, you will need one that you don't have. There is a practical limit to the number of tools and spare parts you can carry on board.
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