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Old 10-29-2012, 05:51 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Angel Island is a state park. There are several but less-protected anchorage locations around the island, but no anchoring that I'm aware of in Ayala Cove. There are boat berths for day use only and the moorage for day/night use. There are toilet facilities and trash cans ashore. ... Hate to imagine the chaos of unregulated anchoring in the cove, especially with the quirky tidal currents along with the frequent ferry services.
Well then, it looks like pretty much what I posted. The government, in this case the state, placed moorings and outlawed anchoring in the cove as a source of revenue. That is, unless they own the water or the ground beneath it. Usually that is public property, open to anyone.
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Old 10-29-2012, 11:12 PM   #62
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I think the difference, in fact snd in perception, between a selling broker and a buyer's broker is pretty clear irrespective of the source of the payment-the selling broker's obligation is to the owner of a specific boat, his obligation is to get the best deal he can for the owner of that boat alone. The buying broker's obligation is to the buyer, to get hiim the best deal on a predefined boat type, not that specific boat If the selling broker's boat is not the best deal and the best fit, the buying broker moves on. The selling broker is still tied to selling that boat.
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Really the sellers and buyers brokers both have the same goal in mind. And that is, to close the sale of the boat or property. Because they don't make a penny unless the buyer and seller come to an agreement in the end.

The difference in commission based on the sale price is generally irrelevant to the broker. I've seen salesmen give up a significant portion of their commission, not because they were feeling generous, but just to complete the sale. Bringing both sides together, coming to an agreement and qualifying for financing in order to complete the sale is enough of a challenge.

Larry B.
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Old 10-30-2012, 12:22 AM   #63
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Really the sellers and buyers brokers both have the same goal in mind. And that is, to close the sale of the boat or property. Because they don't make a penny unless the buyer and seller come to an agreement in the end.
And that`s the problem. No sale= no commission. And the seller is paying the buyer`s broker. In whose interests is a buyers broker, retained by the buyer, paid by the seller, working for that commission?
It should be the buyer, but the desire to make a $ could result in pushing for a sale where a buyer should be told to not proceed; in that case the buyers broker is advocating for himself and effectively for the seller,not the buyer to who he owes an independent duty ." That would never happen", you say. It can, under that system. It can be like 2 brokers in conjunction.
A transaction which does not look right, ie seller pays buyers broker, is not right. To say it is to see it. A buyer would be better served retaining and paying his own adviser,if he really needs one as well as the surveyor.
But that`s not the practice and surprisingly most contributors think it`s ok. Maybe it works in practice but just looks bad. BruceK
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Old 10-30-2012, 07:00 AM   #64
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...I've seen salesmen give up a significant portion of their commission, not because they were feeling generous, but just to complete the sale. Bringing both sides together, coming to an agreement and qualifying for financing in order to complete the sale is enough of a challenge. ..Larry B.
Yup. Here's our great broker story. In 1996 when buying a sailboat (asking price $169K), we were 10K apart. Our broker went back to the sellers broker and suggested that we all forgo 2.5K to close the deal. The other broker said no but the seller said yes. We split the 10K 3 ways. After the survey, there was 5K worth of things that our broker said were over and above normal finds during a survey. She suggested we go back and ask for an additional 5K reduction. We split the 5K 3 ways. So from walking away, we closed the deal with <2K addtioanl out of our or pockit. We are still close friends with our broker, in fact she has visited us twice in Mexcio. She did what needed to be done to close the deal.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:22 AM   #65
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We always tip the crew that hauls us out and shrink wraps our boat (although we are lucky to be in a barn this year so no shrink wrap!). We are one of the biggest boats that they haul and one of the trickiest, so we tip as a special thank you for a difficult job that was well done.

We are at small seasonal marina and we know that the workers are mostly paid minimum wage. We checked with the owner of the marina about tipping and were told that tips are infrequent, but always appreciated. The guys apparently share their tips with the two mechanics...

By the way Andy G. I agree that "the tipping business is a tricky thing".
You mentioned your son coming to work in Canada on the hill at Whistler and enjoying the 'tipping culture' here after working in Australia. My daughter used to work on the hill at Big White (another ski resort in Canada) and has since moved to Australia's Gold Coast. She is working in the hotel industry there and very much misses Canada's 'tipping culture'!

Re employers thinking that tips should be considered part of an employee's wage, I consider that to be very unfair. Tips are meant to be a thank you for work well done - in my opinion.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:29 AM   #66
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. ......... Re employers thinking that tips should be considered part of an employee's wage, I consider that to be very unfair. Tips are meant to be a thank you for work well done - in my opinion.
I worked for a county public school system and tips were not expected. A free cup of coffee was about it. Once or twice we got invited to a school's "Winter" party.

In my view, employers should pay their workers what the job is worth and the "thank you for work well done" should be a pat on the back and the opportunity to continue in the position.

My wife worked in a grocery store and employees were expected to help the customers and be nice to them. They didn't receive tips for doing this, but ones who didn't were first counselled, then terminated if their "attitude" didn't improve.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:45 AM   #67
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[QUOTE=rwidman;110409]
In my view, employers should pay their workers what the job is worth and the "thank you for work well done" should be a pat on the back and the opportunity to continue in the position.

Ron, I agree that there should not be the 'expectation' of extra payment for jobs well done. However, I do think though that rewarding an employee for work done to a level higher than average is a good thing. I am sure that any employee who receives a bonus from their boss or a tip from a satisfied customer appreciates the extra recognition. I know that I would!
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:57 AM   #68
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I sometimes got a "thanks" from school staff or my boss and I got an outstanding service award, but tips and bonuses are not typically a part of government employment.

For some of us, knowing that we did a good job rather than a half assed job is reward enough.
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