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Old 10-28-2012, 09:01 AM   #21
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I'm with FF on this - a dozen donuts at haul out or launching. But I do tip the manager at Christmas. (Is that considered a tip or a Christmas present?) He uses the money to buy his crew lunch.

No, I don't receive tips. But I get paid a hell of a lot more than minimum wage. Maybe I just have a soft spot for those who are living at the lowest end of the economic scale, where I spent most of my life.
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:40 AM   #22
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I'm with Jat and Gonzo on this. I know to tip wait staff 20% as that is the going rate, but I don't know the going rate for other services. At the fuel dock, I tip the attendant $10 after getting $800 or more worth of fuel. He seems to smile and thank me but I don't know if I'm being a cheapskate there. Also, at hotels I tip the maid $5 a day regardless of the rate that I am paying. Am I overtipping or undertipping the maid? The people that receive tips are for the most part lowly paid and count on tips as part on their wage.
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Old 10-28-2012, 10:05 AM   #23
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Thanks, all. Because of this forum I may have saved 50 bucks (minus the price of a box of Timbits). BTW, at a Canadian marina I used to use, the crew appreciated (expected?) a leftover bottle from the liquor cabinet.
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Old 10-28-2012, 11:26 AM   #24
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I tip the launch and recovery crew at the yard (haulout/washdown/remove dink with forklift/block the boat) $50 in the Spring and Fall. Good guys that I've known for years and who are extra careful with the boat.

We are summer live-aboards at a municipal marina. In the past I have given the marina manager about 10% of annual slip fee, which he divided among the crew of six...most of whom we know, as they return each summer. Starting next year, I will tip individually...
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Old 10-28-2012, 12:01 PM   #25
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Tips, I'll give'm a tip. Get a better job. Go back to school to prepare. A tip is a disincentive to personal betterment. It's a feel good thing both for the giver and receiver. It's demeaning. Don't they know that it is really the yacht owners that are in a financial squeeze. Timjet started a thread about lack of yacht use. With $4.00/gal fuel whose really hurting here. No one feels sorry for the poor yacht owner.

While we are on the subject. Our welfare is costing us a trillion dollars. That's where the money is. That's a total of $60.000 per welfare recipient. We need to tax that and other low income people to let them pay their fair share. Then they will want to do better and cut taxes too. It's a win-win.

Just had to stir things up a little. Of course, I was only kidding. We do tip for good service. We usually tip dock hands when they give us assistance. We will tip at the fuel dock especially for a pump out. We usually do something for the guys at Christmas. Many times I am not present for haul out so don't usually tip there.

Especially in Florida there are some arrogant yacht owners. I have had a couple of yard managers tell me that his guys really liked working on my boat. That makes his job easier. I told him I never forget where I came from, and appreciate good work. I always make it a point whether it is on the boat or on the job to tell someone who has done a good job. Whether it is a service guy or an employee if extra effort was done I will usually give $50.00, and tell them to take their wife out for dinner.
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Old 10-28-2012, 03:37 PM   #26
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I've even gone as far as tipping a boat broker. It was more to benefit me than him. I had a broker represent me as a buyer and in negotiating the price, I told him that I would give him a 10% tip on the difference between the asking price and the selling price. This was when the economy was good and sellers were more firm on asking price. He ended up with a nice tip and me a good purchase price.
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:26 PM   #27
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I've even gone as far as tipping a boat broker. It was more to benefit me than him. I had a broker represent me as a buyer and in negotiating the price, I told him that I would give him a 10% tip on the difference between the asking price and the selling price. This was when the economy was good and sellers were more firm on asking price. He ended up with a nice tip and me a good purchase price.
As an ex real estate agency owner and retired real estate lawyer who as often as not represented buyers, I always had great difficulty wrapping my brain around the concept, and legally recognized practice, of a "buyer's broker" (a broker who is supposed to represent the best interests of a buyer, including advising the buyer as to the current market value of a particular property and helping the buyer negotiate the best price) being paid a commission by and through the seller's broker based on the percentage of the sales price paid by the seller to the seller's broker.

Your "tip" was one suggestion I sometimes tried, with limited success, to
inject into listing and purchase and sales agreements.
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:36 PM   #28
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I keep a stack of $5 bills (I call them "boat dollars") on hand. I tip the guy at the fuel dock and a dockhand who helps me to dock the boat. I give the dockhands at my marina $25 or so in a Christmas card each year and my wife makes home made salsa and zuchini cake for the dockmaster and office staff.

We don't have a winter haulout here, any haulout is for maintenance or dictated by the marina if a hurricane is coming. I never thought is was necessary or appropriate to tip for this and still don't think it is.

On the one hand, I strongly believe employers should be paying workers what their work is worth and the customers shouldn't have to pay by tipping. A $20 meal should cost $20, not $24.00.

On the other hand, if you own a home and a boat and your boat is worth more than a dockhand's home (if he even owns one), it seems pretty cheap not to hand him a tip for good service.
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:39 PM   #29
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If the "tip" was the ONLY fee to the broker... THEN you could claim to be a true buyer's broker. Otherwise, there is no way a broker can claim objectivity if their check comes from the seller. Just sayin'.

Grabs popcorn. Here we go again.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:00 PM   #30
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We don't have a winter haulout here, any haulout is for maintenance or dictated by the marina if a hurricane is coming. I never thought is was necessary or appropriate to tip for this and still don't think it is.

On the one hand, I strongly believe employers should be paying workers what their work is worth and the customers shouldn't have to pay by tipping. A $20 meal should cost $20, not $24.00.
Nobody says anyone HAS to tip. You must admit that boatyard employees are pretty low on the income scale in the marine service industry. All I am saying is that I have no issues with helping them for helping me. Moreover, in their eyes they may indeed make plenty of money for what they do, but a small gesture that says, "Thanks." or "Please give me your best." is NEVER a bad idea and goes a long way. Sure, that can include doughnuts or even just a thank you note. Even a firm handshake and pat on the back can help, but you are fooling yourself to think you will get the same level of service just because you expect it and give them nothing.

What I find interesting is that Bess and I are very likely on the lower end of the income bracket among TF members. We have both worked in businesses where tips are part of our take-home pay, yet we seem to be in the minority of people willing to make tips a regular part of boating. As it may only add up to a few hundred bucks a year, we will enjoy continuing to make you guys look like a bunch of rich cheapskates. (just kidding there guys)

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Old 10-28-2012, 07:09 PM   #31
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Nobody says anyone HAS to tip. You must admit that boatyard employees are pretty low on the income scale in the marine service industry. All I am saying is that I have no issues with helping them for helping me. Moreover, in their eyes they may indeed make plenty of money for what they do, but a small gesture that says, "Thanks." or "Please give me your best." is NEVER a bad idea and goes a long way. Sure, that can include doughnuts or even just a thank you note. Even a firm handshake and pat on the back can help, but you are fooling yourself to think you will get the same level of service just because you expect it and give them nothing.

What I find interesting is that Bess and I are very likely on the lower end of the income bracket among TF members. We have both worked in businesses where tips are part of our take-home pay, yet we seem to be in the minority of people willing to make tips a regular part of boating. As it may only add up to a few hundred bucks a year, we will enjoy continuing to make you guys look like a bunch of rich cheapskates. (just kidding there guys)

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If you had quoted my entire post, you would have included this part:

Quote:
I keep a stack of $5 bills (I call them "boat dollars") on hand. I tip the guy at the fuel dock and a dockhand who helps me to dock the boat. I give the dockhands at my marina $25 or so in a Christmas card each year and my wife makes home made salsa and zuchini cake for the dockmaster and office staff.
Quote:
On the other hand, if you own a home and a boat and your boat is worth more than a dockhand's home (if he even owns one), it seems pretty cheap not to hand him a tip for good service.
By leaving that part out, the impression is that I am some sort of cheapskate. Taken in its entirety, I don't think my post would lead someone to that conclusion.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:16 PM   #32
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I tip infrequently. I hate the whole idea of tipping.

I think I'd tip a lot more if I could also hold back a few dollars for the times when I received poor service.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:21 PM   #33
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dwhatty and Gonzo,

I also question the buyers broker's objectivity for reasons you've cited. That is why I came up with the 10% tip. I've always used a buyer's broker with boats and real estate and have never regretted it. It cost me nothing and I am as less involved with the deal as possible. I am going through this right now in purchasing an apartment building and my agent is great. He also has a property management company which I've hired to do the management. He also knows that I want to be as less involved as possible and he respects that. To me a win win.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:24 PM   #34
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I think I'd tip a lot more if I could also hold back a few dollars for the times when I received poor service.
I was going to say "you can" (meaning you can hold back the tip) but then I considered that you may mean "hold back something from the entire bill in lieu of service not received." And I agree wholeheartedly that this would be a great arrangement.

I think part of the disconnect here is that some of the posters return repeatedly to the same marine service providers. In that case their claim that they receive better service as a result of past tips makes sense. For those of us who wander a lot, tipping is just another expense. The service provider will likely never see us again so their current attitude is what it is. Which leads logically to my desire to tip only for exceptional service and my resentment that some employer/employees expect me to tip regardless of the calibre of the service.

OTOH, when I check into a hotel for a long stay I will often make a point of tipping excessively at the start of the stay in order to ensure future service. Maybe that's selfish but its also logical.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:35 PM   #35
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I am some sort of cheapskate. I think my post would lead someone to that conclusion.


Sorry Ron... I will do a better next time. I really wasn't picking on you at all, just that that portion of your post is what sparked the train (or train wreck) of thought that I had. It was more of an inspirational quote. Not one to shed you in a bad light. Again, my apologies.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:47 PM   #36
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I think part of the disconnect here is that some of the posters return repeatedly to the same marine service providers. In that case their claim that they receive better service as a result of past tips makes sense. For those of us who wander a lot, tipping is just another expense.
Why should it matter? If you tip at haulout, you stand out from the crowd for your entire stay. If you tip at the end, you walk away with them feeling good and with yourself feeling better that you appreciated their effort.

Of all people, Jeff, you should know that the boating community can be small in some markets. They WILL remember most boats for many reasons. It only cost me a few bucks for them to remember mine and it will always make them feel good about it.

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Old 10-28-2012, 07:56 PM   #37
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Keep telling yourself that Tom. As long as there's guys like you out there then all of us can at least hope to get the level of service that we should be entitled to, without having to bribe the service providers to provide that level of service. After all, as long as I'm polite they don't know until I leave that I'm also a cheap SOB.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:13 PM   #38
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Compared to the ragbaggers most of you guys are philanthropists.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:56 PM   #39
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Compared to the ragbaggers most of you guys are philanthropists.
The owner of a marina I worked at in college HATED sail boaters. He would say: "The wind's free; they think everything else should be"
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:13 PM   #40
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As an ex real estate agency owner and retired real estate lawyer who as often as not represented buyers, I always had great difficulty wrapping my brain around the concept, and legally recognized practice, of a "buyer's broker" (a broker who is supposed to represent the best interests of a buyer, including advising the buyer as to the current market value of a particular property and helping the buyer negotiate the best price) being paid a commission by and through the seller's broker based on the percentage of the sales price paid by the seller to the seller's broker.
That kind of "buyers broker" sounds hopelessly conflicted. Some real estate buyers here use, and pay a fee to, a "buyers agent" (we call brokers "agents"), to sift listings,look for new or coming listings,negotiate price or bid at auction. Some seller broker/agents would be astounded at (but would probably still ignore) their responsibilities if they checked out the law of Agency. I had some experience in real estate after retiring from law.BruceK
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