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Old 09-06-2015, 09:30 PM   #21
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That's when I learned that much of the planet does their nav markers the other way round from the US and Canada. Once I knew that I didn't have to think about it anymore. It simply became the way it is when running a boat in that part of the world.
The attached pic shows the areas of the world where the two buoyage systems apply.

Far too many boaters take Red Right Returning as absolute and wind up where they shouldn't be. Puget Sound and the BC coast are full of examples where it can be confusing as to when you are actually returning. Then, the direction north and/or flood current come into play. Reading charts, as everyone here knows is imperative.

Locally, the area around Nanaimo has floods running in many directions. Satellite Channel near Swartz Bay, same thing and a great learning area day and night. So many buoys by day and at night, there are a couple of spots where as many as 17 lights can be seen. Red, white and green, many sequences and several duplicates. It's fun to just sit with the appropriate chart and figure it all out.

Also some trivia; the east side of Vancouver Island (Johnstone Strait etc.) floods from north and south. Mitlenatch Island is said to be where the two floods meet. Mitlenatch is Sliammon or Salish for calm on all sides.
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Old 09-06-2015, 09:32 PM   #22
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Being completely ignorant, can you please describe what is meant by "port to port"?
When you are passing bow to bow with another vessel you keep her to your port side and she does likewise. Imagine the waterway as a two lane highway. You stay to your side and she stays to hers.

Overriding all of this is the cardinal rule - avoid a collision. If you are on her starboard side (and she on yours), just power down and wait until she passes rather than try and rectify just to meet the port to port rule, as that would mean you crossing her bow. Or, through use of communications clearly state that you will pass to her starboard. If you do that you should make sure to get an acknowledgement.

I was once traveling from Great Sale Cay to Spanish in the Bahamas and two very large yachts approached at WOT (80-90 footers). We were in a fairly open sea but they were obviously following the Dodge route as was I. They were about a half mile apart. The first cut across my bow going port to starboard near enough to throw a significant wake. My boat could handle it being on my port quarter, but there was some safety concern. I radioed the second yacht and asked for a port to port. He instantly changed course and complied. This also gave the benefit in that we passed stern to stern rather than bow to bow, so much less chance of a collision because of bad judgement.
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Old 09-06-2015, 09:41 PM   #23
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The dangerous part is coming in from the Atlantic using red right returning and hitting the ICW going north, where it changes to red to the west, green to the east. If there happens to be a shoal before you worked it out....
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Old 09-06-2015, 09:46 PM   #24
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Greetings,
Mr. d. When approaching an oncoming vessel the convention is to stay on the right side (your starboard) of the channel and pass said approaching vessel with it on your port side. Aforementioned approaching vessel will do the same and you will pass each other with your port side on his port side. STILL don't know if it's only convention or a law. You are required by law to stay to the right to pass an approaching vehicle on a road.
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Old 09-06-2015, 09:47 PM   #25
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The dangerous part is coming in from the Atlantic using red right returning and hitting the ICW going north, where it changes to red to the west, green to the east. If there happens to be a shoal before you worked it out....
I think someone already said it here: "When in doubt, stop the boat and get out of doubt!"
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Old 09-06-2015, 09:52 PM   #26
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Greetings,
Gee, not too bad. 200+ postings on techniques/inventions before we drifted into rules of the road. I think it was post #'s 210 and 211 that did us in so may I suggest techniques/inventions please. THAT'S the interesting stuff.
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:33 PM   #27
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On my rather light planing boat, the right hand wheel lifts the stbd side, other than suntan balance that is the technical reason for stbd helm. Boats with left hand wheels, helm on port. Weight of the helmsman helps balance when under way. Only applies to light boats where helmsman weight could have any effect.

At cruise my shaft is putting down about 830ft lbs at 200hp and 20kts. I am 175lbs standing about four feet stbd of center line. 4'x175lb is 700ft lb using a moment calc. Pretty dang close.

Need more cheeseburger to balance exactly.
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:40 PM   #28
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I think someone already said it here: "When in doubt, stop the boat and get out of doubt!"
Combine that with:

This is the grave of Mike ODay
Who died maintaining his right of way.
His right was clear, his will was strong,
But hes just as dead as if hed been wrong.


I've seen people more interested in asserting their rights or arguing navigation rules than just doing the common sense thing and backing away to avoid an accident. If you can avert an accident or even a stressful situation, then just do so. I've stopped completely when in a narrow way or approaching congestion just to let the others clear. You see a madhouse occasionally on a bridge opening.
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:46 PM   #29
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Combine that with:

This is the grave of Mike ODay
Who died maintaining his right of way.
His right was clear, his will was strong,
But hes just as dead as if hed been wrong.


I've seen people more interested in asserting their rights or arguing navigation rules than just doing the common sense thing and backing away to avoid an accident. If you can avert an accident or even a stressful situation, then just do so. I've stopped completely when in a narrow way or approaching congestion just to let the others clear. You see a madhouse occasionally on a bridge opening.
Actually, it is really not an option. Here in the US, it is in the regs. Superceding all other rules a vessel MUST do all possible to avoid a collision.
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:53 PM   #30
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Actually, it is really not an option. Here in the US, it is in the regs. Superceding all other rules a vessel MUST do all possible to avoid a collision.
I know that and you know that, but some obviously don't like it. They want to cite and argue Colregs and apparently know all the regs except that one, the one that counts the most.
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Old 09-07-2015, 12:04 AM   #31
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Locomotive engineer controls are located on the "starboard" side.
Except in the UK where the locomotive engineer's position is on the left and the fireman on the right and trains run on the opposite sides of a double track mainline than they do in North America. This still holds true today.
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Old 09-07-2015, 07:31 AM   #32
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Greetings,
Gee, not too bad. 200+ postings on techniques/inventions before we drifted into rules of the road. I think it was post #'s 210 and 211 that did us in so may I suggest techniques/inventions please. THAT'S the interesting stuff.
I meant post 236 as a key trick/technique.
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Old 09-07-2015, 08:21 AM   #33
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I've seen people more interested in asserting their rights or arguing navigation rules than just doing the common sense thing and backing away to avoid an accident. If you can avert an accident or even a stressful situation, then just do so. I've stopped completely when in a narrow way or approaching congestion just to let the others clear. You see a madhouse occasionally on a bridge opening.


Absolutely, I give way regularly in the marina fairway (main channel) when afternoon cruisers leave the bar and enter the fairway without looking. 50' SF and I are on either side of the fuel dock filling. SF starts to pull away from the dock as a 30' cruiser coming from behind tries to go around the SF. SF backs down and starts yelling. Alcohol fueled captain of the cruiser (that never even slowed down) says, "I never saw you moving because you're too big". SF captain responds, "you need to go back to the bar and have another drink".

I have always said that the most dangerous part of running wreck diving charters is making it safely back from the seabuoy to my slip on Saturday afternoon.

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Old 09-07-2015, 09:08 AM   #34
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The dangerous part is coming in from the Atlantic using red right returning and hitting the ICW going north, where it changes to red to the west, green to the east. If there happens to be a shoal before you worked it out....
Just remember in most cases red is on the mainland side of the channel in the ICW. Forget about red, right, returning on the ICW. Other then say leaving it to head out to sea or into a harbour.
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Old 09-07-2015, 09:26 AM   #35
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Just remember in most cases red is on the mainland side of the channel in the ICW. Forget about red, right, returning on the ICW. Other then say leaving it to head out to sea or into a harbour.
I always used the meme; "Red earth (mainland), green water (ocean)"
But you are right it is most (almost all) cases... double check for that little yellow square or triangle!
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Old 09-07-2015, 11:57 AM   #36
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When you are passing bow to bow with another vessel you keep her to your port side and she does likewise. Imagine the waterway as a two lane highway. You stay to your side and she stays to hers.
Thanks Menzies. I am familiar with rules in head-on situations but just had never heard of it referred to as "port to port". This may save me some considerable embarrassment.
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Old 09-07-2015, 12:29 PM   #37
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Thanks Menzies. I am familiar with rules in head-on situations but just had never heard of it referred to as "port to port". This may save me some considerable embarrassment.
You may on the radio hear it called a "one whistle" pass.

Especially if you monitor channel 13 on a second radio.
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Old 09-07-2015, 01:12 PM   #38
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You may on the radio hear it called a "one whistle" pass.

Especially if you monitor channel 13 on a second radio.
Actually that's not quite accurate. The one and two whistle passes are used when overtaking someone from astern to let them know, first that you are there and passing, and secondly to let them know which side. This is often joined with a request for a slow pass. The slow pass is to give the boat being passed a more comfortable time and to speed up the procedure.
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Old 09-07-2015, 01:16 PM   #39
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How in the H E double hockey sticks did this turn into a fricken basic navigation thread?

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Old 09-07-2015, 01:52 PM   #40
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Actually that's not quite accurate. The one and two whistle passes are used when overtaking someone from astern to let them know, first that you are there and passing, and secondly to let them know which side. This is often joined with a request for a slow pass. The slow pass is to give the boat being passed a more comfortable time and to speed up the procedure.
They also apply when meeting bow to bow.
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