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Old 04-18-2012, 06:22 AM   #101
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The reality is a wooden boat is a hobby , in it self.

A far different hobby from going some place IN a boat.
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:23 AM   #102
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Yes Ben,
I remember "sharpie" sail boats w a lot of twist in the fore foot and I've seen most of them are cross planked like yours. Seems like it would be stronger and I've thought of building a plywood boat w the outer ply grain running crossways. I reinforced the center of the bottom of a plywood boat w a panel of ply because it had too much flex. It was totally stiff when done. Anyway I always like seeing pics of your boat.

FF says "The reality is a wooden boat is a hobby , in it self."
There's definitely some truth in that but one can dislike painting and still love a wood boat ......because the're better.
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:37 AM   #103
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Eric + Wood Boat = Love

And that is perfectly OK!! Just sayen...

If I came back as reincarnate - I opt to be Eric's Wood Boat
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:56 AM   #104
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Love your nice warm feelings Art..........

But what if you're wrong and you came back and I let your face peel?

You'd prolly make me read "The Widow with a smile on her Face"

by Rachael Revenge
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:18 PM   #105
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Love your nice warm feelings Art..........

But what if you're wrong and you came back and I let your face peel?

You'd prolly make me read "The Widow with a smile on her Face"

by Rachael Revenge
Now you're getten too nasty! - F Wood!! I'm commen back as an easy shine gelcoat Tollycraft... with no peal and a BIG smile on my face!
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Old 04-19-2012, 02:10 PM   #106
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Eric--- In light of the diagonal planking comments earlier I thought you might enjoy seeing these photos from my research collection. They are shots taken at the Elco plant during WWII. The hulls were built upside down and then flipped for completion.

The color photo was taken in the crew's quarters up forward in a restored Elco 80' PT and shows the exposed hull construction. No fancy trim and interior sheathing on these boats. The square "window" in the side of the hull is a viewing window for the public--- only PT vets and members of certain organizations are allowed inside the boat.

The cartoon is from a WWII Navy magazine.

I was given a VHS copy of a fascinating color movie that Elco made during the war showing the entire production process of an 80' boat from initial framing to sea trials and weapons testing. Very interesting viewing and it's amazing how fast these boats were turned out considering they incorporated what we consider today to be a very slow, laborious boatbuilding process. They-- and Higgins down in New Orleans-- produced these boats faster than I think today's builders could even conceive of producing a glass boat although under the kind of pressures Elco and Higgins were responding to I'm sure it could be done.
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Old 04-19-2012, 03:13 PM   #107
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Very Cool. TY! Marin Plenty of wooden Elco and Higgens around New England in 50's 60' 70's
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Old 04-19-2012, 04:48 PM   #108
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Very Cool. TY! Marin Plenty of wooden Elco and Higgens around New England in 50's 60' 70's

Still a few up our way. We usually see a couple of each every season.
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Old 04-19-2012, 10:12 PM   #109
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Marin,
On the topsides is that the final planking? Most of those boats are triple planked no? I've never seen a boat anywhere near this type w the outside planks anything but fore and aft...basically horizontal. But of course why turn it over if the planking was'nt done?
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Old 04-19-2012, 10:22 PM   #110
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Yes. that's the outer layer of planking in the photos. The PTs were double-diagonal planked with a layer of doped canvas between the two layers of planking. Basically just like a big, giant Chris Craft runabout which were also double-diagonal planked with doped fabric between the layers. The decks of the PTs were also planked with the planks running straight fore and aft. The deck planks were not curved in with the hull at the bow like GBs and whatnot.

The only plywood used in the PTs was in some of the superstructure like the chart house, day room, interior bulkhead surfaces, and .50 caliber gun turrets. Plywood only bends one way so it could only be used on flat or simple curved surfaces like the deck houses and gun tubs.

The hulls were framed upside down and planked upside down and then flipped over in place for installation of the decking. The hulls were then put on dollies and moved out of the hull assembly building to the final assembly building for finishing. The interiors, such as they were, were installed after the decks were on but before the charthouse and dayroom structures were lowered into place. Then came engines, generators and the big hatch over the engine room.

When completed and the armament installed---- four torpedos, two twin-fifty machine guns and, in the first part of the war, one 20mm Oerlikon cannon--- the boats weighed 51 tons, 102,000 pounds (they were ten tons heavier by the end of the war). Power was three 1,350hp gasoline engines. The Navy would not accept a boat unless it achieved and maintained 43 knots fully loaded during sea trials.
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Old 04-20-2012, 05:46 AM   #111
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" one can dislike painting and still love a wood boat ......because the're better."

They are better!

At the end of their useful lives the wooden boats are left for mother nature to recycle , in shallow water ,they depart even more rapidly than while floating..

The GRP boat needs a trip to the dump, or a Viking funeral .

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Old 08-29-2012, 06:18 AM   #112
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Falling asleep with the sound of waves slapping on fibreglass isn't as soothing as on wood.
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:19 AM   #113
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Local Yacht builder here has a CNC machine cut the temp frames to lay the 1/4 inch ply over. It is cut into 10 inch wide pieces, And on the diagonal reversing 90 degeres on each layer and full epoxy adhesive. Once the hull is faired then is is glassed and faired and gel coated then painted. before its lifted off the temp frame work. When its righted its set in a cradle and then the inside is glassed and the stringers are installed and all structural foam is 2 inches thick. once the inside is finished then the inner side is also gel coated and painted, Caison Yachts i stop by about every week to see the progress on the boats.
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