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Old 07-21-2014, 08:28 PM   #21
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Get a bottle of Orange Glo and see how she feels about it. We stopped using teak oil many years ago and boy do we have teak!..........
Your teak doesn't look oiled at all. It looks varnished or urethaned in that picture.
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Old 07-21-2014, 08:33 PM   #22
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The pledge and the Orange Glo are both made from orange oil which certainly smells better than the linseed or tong oils. Personally I have no problem with seeing the teak without any of those products and I am not sure if any actually protect the teak or lengthen teak's lasting qualities. I am sure they all enhance the "look" and clean.
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Old 07-21-2014, 08:37 PM   #23
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Your teak doesn't look oiled at all. It looks varnished or urethaned in that picture.
Yes it is coated by the factory in 1985 but we use the Orange Glo to clean it and freshen it up. Have a few items (racks, stands, new trim and holders) that I have made over the years, they blend right in.....
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Old 07-21-2014, 10:21 PM   #24
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Yes it is coated by the factory in 1985 but we use the Orange Glo to clean it and freshen it up. Have a few items (racks, stands, new trim and holders) that I have made over the years, they blend right in.....
It all looks very good in that photo, congrats on keeping it up so nicely.
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Old 07-21-2014, 11:12 PM   #25
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Yes, the interior looked great. Only not enough coke storage (soft drink).
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Old 07-21-2014, 11:43 PM   #26
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Yes, the interior looked great. Only not enough coke storage (soft drink).
Thats only because my buddies haven't found the rum locker yet........
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Old 07-22-2014, 06:59 AM   #27
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My experience with interior teak is a bit limited, but all that I have seen is not oiled, but polyurethaned (or some similar product). Once cured, which is clearly would be on any boat post delivery, I don't think they small at all.

I still wonder whether the teak is the source of the smell.
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Old 07-22-2014, 07:35 AM   #28
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I'm in the "not the teak" camp. I suggest cleaning the bilge first and see if the problem is solved or diminished. I use simple green diluted in a pail of water and throw that in the bilge, go for a ride then rinse it out. Good luck, smells are a nuisance for sure but most boats have one at some point in time for various reasons, all curable IMHO.
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Old 07-22-2014, 07:43 AM   #29
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Most boats stop smelling when they are used regularly and opened up more...the alternative is a good ventilation setup when gone.
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Old 07-22-2014, 09:14 AM   #30
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Try smelling some raw teak that has never been on a boat. Maybe it's not the teak . Raw teak does have it's on smell . It's not that bad to me but I like teak. It's very strong when machining it .
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:01 AM   #31
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Interesting. I've been on a lot of boats with a lot of interior teak and other wood paneling, but like others here, have never really noticed an teak or tung oil odor. For instance various types of oil, especially tung are popular to treat the extensive afromosia paneling on classic Hatteras boats.

Now that's not to say I also haven't been on a lot of smelly boats... mildew, stagnant bilge water, gunky sumps, oil, diesel, holding tank odors. Older, lower priced, at-best-modestly maintained trawlers and sail boats seem particularly vulnerable. As Psneeld points out, seldom used boats that are shut up for long periods almost all develop some smell. That includes old Hatts too that have not been maintained or used; there is something called "That Hatteras Smell" which is a combination of stale bilge, sump and seawater heads. One of our checklist items when boat shopping was "no smells". The Po of our boat was a fanatic about this and we were too in tracking down any new little smells and eliminating the root cause. But because the boat got a lot of use, none of that stale air issue ever developed.
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Old 07-22-2014, 11:11 AM   #32
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I will gladly trade my African Mahogany today for your Bermese teak next week . Bermese teak wholesale is about 25$ per board ft and retails much higher . If you tell her that she may think teak smells like roses
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Old 07-22-2014, 02:41 PM   #33
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Most if not all boats acquire a "nose" over time if not rigorously maintained and sometimes even then. I find the smell obnoxious too so I don't blame the admiral. The smell is usually a combination of things including molds, mildews, sanitation hoses, engine oil and grime in the engine room. If you want to get rid of it, replace as much of the soft goods as you can--carpets, mattresses, and the headliner (if you can afford to replace it). The curtins, linens, and cushions covers may be able to be cleaned, but I would put new foam in. Several have mentioned the bilges, but there are dead spaces as well that have to be cleaned. The areas around and under the engines and genset should be scrbbed clean of any oil. The engine room insulation might also be something to consider replacing. You have to keep at it too giving a lot of it regular cleaning. Consider putting a coat of bilge paint in the bilge and paint other dead spaces. Clean the wood and maybe consider freshining it with a coat of whatever is already on there. Maybe consider an ozone generator. I bought a heavy-duty one from Jenesco and use it periodically. It cost a few hundred but it helped a ton. Don't put new or cleaned soft goods back aboard until you have eliminated as much of the smell as possible. Have fun--I always do.
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:30 PM   #34
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While my bilge is dry and there are no signs of mildew or mold, my boat also acquires a 'nose' after about a week of being closed up. In the past month I've been experimenting with leaving my Caframo fans operating while the boat is 'docked and locked'. I leave a couple of ports open, as I always have, and let the 2 fans run continuously.

I have noticed a significant improvement when I first board the boat. If I wasn't in a covered slip with free electricity, I'd be installing a solar vent to achieve the same results.
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:53 PM   #35
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I get it after the boat has been closed up for awhile. As others said, its the soft goods and bilges. How you store in the winter (airflow) has a huge effect on keeping it at bay. I'm trying the Kanberra to see if it really does help permeate and eliminate molds where you can't easily get at them. It's expensive, time will tell.
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Old 07-22-2014, 06:35 PM   #36
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No one has mentioned it..... Leaky teak decks

A particular issue with the Taiwanese trawlers is they have teak decks. They sure do look nice when new. But after years they leak. Thousands of screw holes, 30 year old bedding compound and some freeze / thaw cycles and boom. Leaks.

I bring this up, because the 'phenomenon' is called "the rainforest" inside the trawler. It smells like walking in a lush rainforest canopy with all the decomposing vegetation under foot. Often the evidence is seen as a clear, brownish, or grey oozing sap that runs down out of lockers, overheads, bulkheads and around windows and the like. It is the deck core that has been saturated with water over the years, and is rotting out from within.

There is no cost effective cure. You could remove the decks and tear out the deck, core, and replace. Or you find a trawler that does not (never had) teak decks.

Some people LOVE the teak decks, and learn to accept the stench of the rotting rainforest inside the boat.
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Old 07-22-2014, 07:08 PM   #37
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No one has mentioned it..... Leaky teak decks

A particular issue with the Taiwanese trawlers is they have teak decks. They sure do look nice when new. But after years they leak. Thousands of screw holes, 30 year old bedding compound and some freeze / thaw cycles and boom. Leaks.

I bring this up, because the 'phenomenon' is called "the rainforest" inside the trawler. It smells like walking in a lush rainforest canopy with all the decomposing vegetation under foot. Often the evidence is seen as a clear, brownish, or grey oozing sap that runs down out of lockers, overheads, bulkheads and around windows and the like. It is the deck core that has been saturated with water over the years, and is rotting out from within.

There is no cost effective cure. You could remove the decks and tear out the deck, core, and replace. Or you find a trawler that does not (never had) teak decks.

Some people LOVE the teak decks, and learn to accept the stench of the rotting rainforest inside the boat.
No teak decks on this boat. Never had them.
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Old 07-22-2014, 07:16 PM   #38
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No teak decks on this boat. Never had them.

Ok, but the leaky decks, windows, fuel fills, water fills, etc etc etc are enough to make it happen. If the smell isn't mold based, likely it is the core decomposing. You mention a smell that isn't sewage, isn't mold, so what's left?
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Old 07-22-2014, 08:15 PM   #39
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How's this for a theory. All the boats that the OP looked at were for sale. If you were trying to sell a boat wouldn't you clean it up and maybe oil the teak? I would.
I bet the Admiral was just smelling fresh teak oil and the smell will fade in a few weeks.
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Old 07-22-2014, 09:03 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cappy208 View Post
No one has mentioned it..... Leaky teak decks

A particular issue with the Taiwanese trawlers is they have teak decks. They sure do look nice when new. But after years they leak. Thousands of screw holes, 30 year old bedding compound and some freeze / thaw cycles and boom. Leaks.

I bring this up, because the 'phenomenon' is called "the rainforest" inside the trawler. It smells like walking in a lush rainforest canopy with all the decomposing vegetation under foot. Often the evidence is seen as a clear, brownish, or grey oozing sap that runs down out of lockers, overheads, bulkheads and around windows and the like. It is the deck core that has been saturated with water over the years, and is rotting out from within.

There is no cost effective cure. You could remove the decks and tear out the deck, core, and replace. Or you find a trawler that does not (never had) teak decks.

Some people LOVE the teak decks, and learn to accept the stench of the rotting rainforest inside the boat.
Only if you don't maintain them. Not that hard to do. But people just don't take that time and cost into account (among many other users of time and cost). Love my teak decks; no rainforest. Not really any more expensive than maintaining painted non-skid properly.
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