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Old 08-02-2017, 06:57 PM   #1
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Teak decks fix are replace.

My decks don't look that bad but do have soft spots. If I replace the caulking they seem to be ok. But it has soft spots and they just weren't caulking soon enough because they don't look that bad. So should I strip and glass or just recaulk and get them to not leak? Marine Trader 1982 36 Europe.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:02 PM   #2
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You need to dig down, investigate; dollars to doughnuts the core material is mush and will need to be replaced. You need to get at it because it will migrate into the cabin walls too and damage the interior. They made a nice solid fiberglass deck over top of a crap plywood or whatever core and then drilled about 2000 holes in the fiberglass, hoping to seal it with caulking. What could go wrong?
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:49 PM   #3
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I'm totally with Xsbanks on this one. I was having problems finding where I had 2 leaks near the entrance doors. Fuddled for months then decided just to tear out the teak decking till I found it. Lo and behold, looked like there had been a repair made during construction where the aft portion of the deck had been removed and replaced leaving a patched seam across both sides of the vessel just forward of the entry doors. Over the years the seams widened and this combined with the "2000" holes drilled for the teak installation which over the years had opened up through vibration, I had a potential issue.
I tore all the teak out, dried and patch the seams, patched every hole with Bondo and laid a 3/16" layer of fibreglass on the full 3 deck levels totally sealing the decks. Then I installed composite teak decking I imported from Asia. I am very pleased with the results and have a maintenance free deck that is cooler on the feet in the tropics at a price that a fraction of replacement teak and the 2000 necessary holes
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:52 PM   #4
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If I did this right, there should be a picture of the deck I installed. You will note the stairs that are, in fact, the original teak. I matched them to the composite deck using a blend of two of the three colors of Semco
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:53 PM   #5
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Thanks guys makes perfect since. Yes I need to get in there before it get worse.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:53 PM   #6
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Guess I haven't figured out how to do the picture. Sorry!
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Old 08-06-2017, 06:26 AM   #7
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Teak decks fix are replace.

Had the same decision to make, both on the flybridge and deck around the boat, easy answer for me, teak out-glass and skidcoat in. Teak is beautiful to look at but not to own, chasing down soft spots and the havoc they cause is too much in the way of enjoyment! I will post pictures when completed. Before pics;[ATTACH]67395
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:33 AM   #8
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Had the same decision to make, both on the flybridge and deck around the boat, easy answer for me, teak out-glass and skidcoat in. Teak is beautiful to look at but not to own, chasing down soft spots and the havoc they cause is too much in the way of enjoyment! I will post pictures when completed. Before pics;[ATTACH]67395


I bought lots of penetrating epoxy. Haven't done it yet. Decks are a lot softer after no teak on top. Been keeping teak are some of it. Don't know why yet. Glassing up the holes and very wet underneath.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:48 AM   #9
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Keep the teak. There are some people who look for this to purchase.
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Old 08-06-2017, 11:28 AM   #10
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Keep the teak. There are some people who look for this to purchase.

That is certainly a consideration but...

Seems to me there are two ways to spend money on teak decks (or anything else on a boat for that matter). You can spend time and money (time being more valuable for me now than money) maintaining and repairing the teaks decks, or you can spend the money on a lower selling price (potentially) when the time comes to sell.

I'd rather enjoy the boat now than worry about a future resale value. I might get hit by a bus in a few weeks. Do I want to have spent that few weeks on maintenance or enjoying the boat?

Full disclosure: I'm really lazy and try to avoid unpleasant tasks that I consider work. On past boats, sanding and varnishing were considered "work". The same is true for washing and waxing.

I admit to a large amount of envy and admiration for folks such as BruceB who are diligent, skillful, and relentless in boat maintenance and get a huge amount of enjoyment in the process.
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Old 08-06-2017, 11:33 AM   #11
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jerryhebear - The synthetic teak, is that a "carpet type" glue down process or glue down planks? Thanks.
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:20 PM   #12
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I believe in no teak deck and covered berth. Love spending time using boat, bot fixing it.
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Old 08-06-2017, 06:24 PM   #13
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.... Lo and behold, looked like there had been a repair made during construction where the aft portion of the deck had been removed and replaced leaving a patched seam across both sides of the vessel just forward of the entry doors. Over the years the seams widened ...s

This sounds like the damage was caused by what I think is called a "latent defect", a term I read about somewhere on this forum in a dialogue about insurance. Maybe one of the insurance guys can chime in. But I think they said that some insurance policies will cover the damage caused by a latent defect. They don't pay for the defect, but they pay for the damage caused by a latent defect.... or maybe I got that wrong, but it is worth checking.
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:27 PM   #14
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I bought lots of penetrating epoxy. Haven't done it yet. Decks are a lot softer after no teak on top. Been keeping teak are some of it. Don't know why yet. Glassing up the holes and very wet underneath.
Wow, you were quick. Sorry, coming a bit late now I guess, but this issue of soft cores is just a tad exaggerated. (ask me how I know) If the soft spots are only here and there, and you can stop up any leaks and stop further water entry, then ripping up the top fibreglass layer and replacing all the coring, is perhaps in some cases overkill. If no more water gets in, then the threat of it the damp working its way into the cabin walls is probably very unlikely, and to do the whole shebang is very expensive. Remember, the damp core is still sandwiched between two layers of fibreglass, so even if there are holes drilled in the top layer, it is unlikely the lower layer has been pierced, so the damp is not going anywhere as long as no more water gets in.

A more limited removal of core, (or even leaving it, as the PO of my boat did, with no issues 16 years later), then repairing that layer (seeing you have already ripped up the teak), with the option then of another layer of fibreglass non-skid over the top of it all - or - glueing down faux teak as suggested by Gerryhebear above, which in itself will stiffen the deck up again, is also an option, albeit more expensive. And that faux teak will get hot underfoot in summer, make no mistake about that.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:08 PM   #15
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Wow, you were quick. Sorry, coming a bit late now I guess, but this issue of soft cores is just a tad exaggerated. (ask me how I know) If the soft spots are only here and there, and you can stop up any leaks and stop further water entry, then ripping up the top fibreglass layer and replacing all the coring, is perhaps in some cases overkill. If no more water gets in, then the threat of it the damp working its way into the cabin walls is probably very unlikely, and to do the whole shebang is very expensive. Remember, the damp core is still sandwiched between two layers of fibreglass, so even if there are holes drilled in the top layer, it is unlikely the lower layer has been pierced, so the damp is not going anywhere as long as no more water gets in.

A more limited removal of core, (or even leaving it, as the PO of my boat did, with no issues 16 years later), then repairing that layer (seeing you have already ripped up the teak), with the option then of another layer of fibreglass non-skid over the top of it all - or - glueing down faux teak as suggested by Gerryhebear above, which in itself will stiffen the deck up again, is also an option, albeit more expensive. And that faux teak will get hot underfoot in summer, make no mistake about that.


Nice! Thanks. Yes I have all the teak off and I don't think the deck is that bad. All patches done so no more leaks. Think I'll wait a bit before penetrating epoxy is added and then glass over and nonskid. Miss my nice teak deck but not the weight and the leaks. Wasn't leaking but now I'm sure it's not.
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Old 08-06-2017, 09:12 PM   #16
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I don't have teak decks, but I did have a small patch (10x30 inches) of wet core due to water ingress at my windlass and forestay chainplate. Even without any teak to replace, it was a big job to re-core then reseal and epoxy the area.

Just sealing it up does not give it the strength the deck had originally. I'd be concerned if the core is wet near deck fittings such as cleats or stanchions especially. When the core is the consistency of porridge, it needs more than a bit of penetrating epoxy.
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Old 08-06-2017, 10:31 PM   #17
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I don't have teak decks, but I did have a small patch (10x30 inches) of wet core due to water ingress at my windlass and forestay chainplate. Even without any teak to replace, it was a big job to re-core then reseal and epoxy the area.

Just sealing it up does not give it the strength the deck had originally. I'd be concerned if the core is wet near deck fittings such as cleats or stanchions especially. When the core is the consistency of porridge, it needs more than a bit of penetrating epoxy.
Fair comment Aus, but the cleats and stanchions are usually up on the hull capping and not down on the deck. But yes, it needs to be approached with caution. However, I hear so often on here folk suggesting major and expensive repair approaches that occasionally come close to the sledgehammer on a walnut thing, or as if money is no object. Maybe to some it's not, but it sure is to me - and many others on here I suspect.
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Old 08-06-2017, 11:57 PM   #18
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Old 08-07-2017, 12:01 AM   #19
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Yes it can be an expensive repair.
With my flush deck design I had no choice really. I wanted the deck solid around my windlass.
I did the small recoring job myself so it was only about 100 bucks for materials. It took me about 40 or 50 hours though so I'd hate to pay for someone else to do it.
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Old 08-07-2017, 07:53 AM   #20
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ROT REPAIR -Wood Rot Info, Help, Products 603-435-7199
Read the section about antifreeze and rot. If you can keep the deck covered long enough to put some in the rotted areas and let it dry before you cover the holes, it may help keeping the rot from spreading. Evidently this company sell an epoxy that can cure to damp wood, but get it as dry as possible.
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