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Old 09-27-2014, 03:29 PM   #21
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Well, I agree- you are crazy.

You like the layout, teak trim and decks is ok with you, you understand the issues with an older boat, you like the quality, you like the cache. There are no cons.

If anything the 36 may be too small for a full time live aboard. Depends on how long are your elbows. Consider the 42.

But buy a GB.

David
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Old 09-27-2014, 03:44 PM   #22
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On the subject of "wet boats"--agree that the GB hull take a lot of spray. The other issue is rain. Our former GB's were classic style, and there are many advantages to that design. However, I found that if it's raining and blowing, water is coming into the salon every time you open the door. A really nice feature of a covered after deck EU is that one can enter the salon in wet weather without bringing the rain in too. Add that to your "pros" list....
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Old 09-27-2014, 03:53 PM   #23
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It's interesting to note that we prefer the ladder to the FB. On the classic, if the boat rolls suddenly while you are on the way down, you could go overboard as you are facing the port rail and are well above it. With the ladder, the effect of a roll is lessened as you are at the stern section of the boat and if you do lose balance, odds are you will land in the cockpit not in the drink.

We have never been troubled by wave noise although you do here the chain at times.
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Old 09-27-2014, 04:36 PM   #24
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We've owned our GB36 for over 16 years now. In our experience and observation GBs are very high maintenance boats. Not mechanically, but aesthetically. They have a rainforest of external teak trim to keep up unless you get a late 90s or later model that was ordered with mostly stainless rails, or find an older boat on which a previous owner has replaced the rails with stainless.

If you like working on wood, as I do, then it's fine.

The older the teak deck gets the more maintenance it will need because the seams will start needing replacing or repair. Not a hard job but a long one, and if you don't do it yourself, a very expensive one. And if you don't keep after the seams and plugs you'll start to get leaks though the main and flying bridge decks into the interior of the boat. Unless you get a very recent GB that was made after they started gluing the deck planks down instead of screwing them down.

On the plus side there is an excellent GB owners forum with a lot of very experienced GB owners, including ex-shipwrights and yard owners, to provide advice and guidance on virtually every aspect of these boats.

But if you aren't going to keep it in a boathouse, a GB, particularly an older one, is a never-ending maintenance job thanks to the weather, whether you do it yourself or hire the work out.

I rarely recommend a GB to people asking about what kind of boat to get, partly because of the upkeep issue and partly because of the wet-boat and rough-water ride issues. In any kind of a windy, choppy condition, about as much water comes onto the boat as goes under it.

Well, not really. But we have a five mile run every time we go out or come home across an often windy, choppy bay, and even on nice, sunny days we frequently have the wipers going all the way across and the decks are running with water the whole way.

Some people don't like the GB's ride in rough water. Like most semi-planing hulls, the GB's hull has a snap-back roll, as opposed to the gentler roll of a boat with a more rounded bottom. We don't mind it but some GB owners do.

The advice I always give people who are contemplating buying a GB is charter one before buying one. The boat has a deservedly good reputation, but it has enough drawbacks and quirks to make it worthwhile for a potential buyer to live with one for a week or two to see if the hype truly lives up to the reality in terms of what they want in a boat.

Some people find that it does, some people find that it doesn't. But better, I think, to find out before one plunks down a bunch of money for a boat they then discover is not really what they had in mind in terms of a cruising boat.

In my opinion a GB is too small on the inside for a liveaboard unless one gets a big one; 46, 48, 49, or 52 feet. Of course this is totally subjective; some people have no problem living on a 28 or 30 foot sailboat.
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Old 09-27-2014, 05:46 PM   #25
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We have owned our 1981 42 GB classic for 4+ years now. Love the wide walkways and don't mind the galley main salon layout. Bright work is ongoing but not difficult if maintained on a regular basis with exception of deck. We have never had a wet boat issue except for when we were caught out in bad weather. Boat did fine though. Unless we hit the lottery and can reach for a Nordhavn we wouldn't change a darn thing. I guess that's love. 😍
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:45 PM   #26
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GB's are great boats.. all boats are "wet" if you run them in rough enough conditions.

HOLLYWOOD
Not so. It's almost impossible to get spray on the forward windows on our DeFever.
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Old 09-27-2014, 08:31 PM   #27
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...

But if you aren't going to keep it in a boathouse, a GB, particularly an older one, is a never-ending maintenance job thanks to the weather, whether you do it yourself or hire the work out. ...
There is always something to be fixed on a boat.

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Old 09-27-2014, 10:49 PM   #28
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We looked and waited until we could get a sedan or Europa style, precisely because of the easy indoor/outdoor access, wide side decks and covered shady cockpit. Maybe it would be worth considering adding the style into the mix, and not just the brand name..?

If you are going to be on your own most of the time, then the aft cabin is largely superfluous, except you will end up dumping a whole lot of 'stuff' in whichever cabin you don't sleep in, and being solo, you would be wise to sleep up front, as you can detect changing conditions, anchor movements, etc much better.

The other downside, I would think, to the tri-cabin style for you is that there would be a tendency to be inside - or very definitely outside, and in the elements. The only shaded place to lounge outside would be up top in the flybridge, where the sun often slants in on you anyway, and again, downstairs is where everything is accessible, including food and drink, and you can keep an eye on everything, as there is no-one else to, which is important. So, predictably, you would spend most time inside. I can confirm on a nice day, the covered cockpit is the place to be at anchor, for sure.
PS. Pic taken after hull 2 pack repaint, and before names etc back on.
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Old 09-27-2014, 11:55 PM   #29
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For many years I thought the GB42 would be the ideal boat to move up to from a 34 convertible. Safe, economical, and great lines. My wife and I chartered a 42 Europa to find out how ideal it is. It was a great boat except for two things. First, it was very wet. Normal PNW chop resulted in spray over the bow and onto the windshield constantly. Very disappointing and a reason to look elsewhere. Second, every time I sat up in bed, I hit my head. I eventually stopped hitting my head, but it gave me another reason to look elsewhere. My DeFever 46 rarely has spray on the pilothouse windows, almost never. And there is plenty of headroom in the master stateroom. There is a lot to love about GBs, but you should charter one to make sure it is the right boat for you before you buy.
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:14 AM   #30
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No problem at all
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Old 09-28-2014, 11:08 AM   #31
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Our 32' has been modified with a cockpit hardtop and full canvas. In addition to protection from sun and rain it also tripled the amount of usable space on the flybridge. We have no complaints with this layout and if we ever get a bigger boat it will be a Europa.

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Old 09-28-2014, 12:11 PM   #32
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A new option from GB, they say it can be retrofitted to older boats but I'm sure it ain't cheap.
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Old 09-28-2014, 12:18 PM   #33
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After making the decision 6 months ago to transition from a land lubber to a full time cruiser; my Pro/Con list, requirements and needs and wants point to a post '88 GB Europa 36'. There are many checks on my "Pro" list for this vessel. I need some more checks in the "Con" column.
This ad, and description impressed me

1973 Defever Jensen Marine Passage Maker Power Boat For Sale -
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Old 09-28-2014, 01:25 PM   #34
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A HUGE advantage of the tri-cabin configuration in a smaller GB-- 36 or 42-- is that if one has guests on board for a cruise, each couple has their own stateroom and head with the neutral territory of the main cabin in between. This means that someone or a couple can get up, make coffee, go for a walk, sit and read, whatever, without disturbing the people in the other cabin.

When we bought our old GB36 we did not anticipate ever taking any other people with us on the boat. Since that time, people I used to work with in television in Hawaii have moved to our area and we have taken them as well as good friends from France on a number of cruises into BC. So we have really come to appreciate the advantages of the tri-cabin layout.

BTW, we use the aft cabin as our main stateroom. The forward cabin when it's not being used by guests is our shop and storage area.

All that said, we feel that for a cruising couple the Europa GBs are the better bet. The aft deck can be enclosed with transparent curtains and even heated. So one can be outside but not be outside.

While we are not going for anything even resembling a GB in our next boat, were we in the market again for a slow cruising boat, we would very strongly consider a GB Europa rather than the tri-cabin for the kind of cruising we anticipate doing from here on in.
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Old 09-28-2014, 02:40 PM   #35
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Great responses, thank you.
I may have mentioned; I'm a retired airline mech. and build live edge furniture professionally now. I will be taking my Festool sanding system aboard along with some quality brushes, a few caulking guns, a drill and a bag of teak plugs and whatever other tools I can manage to find room for.
I have considered a '42 Europa but I fear that it may be too much boat to handle on my own in challenging conditions. The added expense of the '42; both outright cost and operating costs may be too much pressure on my budget.
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Old 09-28-2014, 02:49 PM   #36
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I lived in and restored an 1880s era Victorian home for the better part of a decade. Forget boats, If you wanna torture yourself and lose a ton of money; buy and restore a Gingerbread house.
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Old 09-28-2014, 03:00 PM   #37
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I have considered a '42 Europa but I fear that it may be too much boat to handle on my own in challenging conditions.

I wouldn't expect to it be any more difficult, and the 42 might even be easier to handle if the side decks are slightly more generous than on the 36. Presuming twins with no bow thruster, lightly more shaft (prop) separation may be more favorable in the 42, as well.

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Old 09-28-2014, 03:16 PM   #38
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Cool

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Presuming twins with no bow thruster, lightly more shaft (prop) separation may be more favorable in the 42, as well.

-Chris
My largest budgeted expense will be fuel. The twins appear to exceed that budget.
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:16 PM   #39
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I lived in and restored an 1880s era Victorian home for the better part of a decade. Forget boats, If you wanna torture yourself and lose a ton of money; buy and restore a Gingerbread house.

Been there, done that in a historic preservation district. Great way to hemorrhage cash and have absolutely nothing to show for it except a couple neighbors you don't like gratitude. I'd say you're ready for a project boat
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:58 PM   #40
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Been there, done that in a historic preservation district. Great way to hemorrhage cash and have absolutely nothing to show for it except a couple neighbors you don't like gratitude. I'd say you're ready for a project boat
If ya wanna get a check for $100K; spend $150K restoring a boat.
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