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Old 05-08-2015, 06:16 PM   #21
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Apparently plastic boats also sink...
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Old 05-08-2015, 09:56 PM   #22
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Date wood, marry fiberglass.
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Old 05-08-2015, 10:44 PM   #23
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The boat is at the schooner wharf. We were on the coast today bumming around the marinas looking at boats (research! and happen to see it. We walked out and gave it a cursory look see...beautiful lines. Don't know how the bottom looks but the hull above the waterline looked ok at first glance. The decks looked well taken care of but the cabin paint was tired looking. I don't have cash ready for boat purchase just yet so we didnt inquire any further. Also saw a couple boats for sale at the Biloxi Small craft harbor. Shot the bull with the harbor master at Point Cadet also, he seems like a real nice fellow. Everyday I am getting more ready to get off the dirt!!
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:23 PM   #24
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I have owned a couple wood boats going back to when this one would have been new. It might be reasonable to say that a wood boat has half the useful life of a fiberglass boat. Using that as a guide we can say a wood boat ages 2 years for every one year a glass boat does. So a 1974 wood boat could be said to be 82 years old in "wood boat years". I know I am going to upset some wood boat owners but that is just my opinion based on experience. I love wood boats but would never want to own another. If I were 21 years old again, perhaps!
Well put - jw!
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:38 PM   #25
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The boat may have value for someone, but the terms--unless I'm missing something--are unjustifiable: a $1900 haulout, forfeited if you don't follow through on the purchase no matter what you discover below the waterline?

###### THE TERMS FOR PRE-PURCHASE HAUL OUT AND INSPECTION OF CIAO If you want to have Ciao hauled out for your personal, pre-purchase inspection below the waterline, pay me $1,900 cash and I will have the boat hauled out at Pitalo's in Gautier, MS promptly, weather permitting. If you decide to purchase this boat after your inspection, the $1,900 will be applied in full toward the total cost of the bottom job described herein (option #4) for YOUR benefit. BUT, if you fail to complete the purchase transaction of Ciao with full payment of the purchase price stated herein within the 7 free days included for the boat bottom job work on the yard, for ANY REASON after the haul out, you shall forfeit the $1,900 payment.
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Old 05-09-2015, 06:46 AM   #26
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"Why is everybody so afraid of sanding and painting? Yea I know."

Its not the work , of sanding and painting , it is the REQUIREMENT that any leak, and single drop if water must Immediately be traced to the source and be repaired.

A drip on a plastic or metal boat can be repaired , eventually , with no harm.( unless its into your bunk!)

On a woody any delay can mean actual repair , like a new plank, may be required from any leak.

Wet wood does not rot , dry wood does not rot , but the transition from wet to dry goes thru the ROT zone , and must be avoided.

So "needing a bit of paint in spots" , can mean planking or rib replacement , under the paint.
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Old 05-09-2015, 08:43 AM   #27
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What's w all this "wooden" boat talk. Just say "wood" boat. What's the "en" for. When metal toys came along they refered to wood toys as "wooden" toys. As in not very substantial. Substandard. Not long lasting. Cheap. Ect.
"WoodenBoat Magazine", "WoodenBoat School", "Wooden Boat Festival", and the "Center for Wooden Boats" all "wood" disagree.
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:16 AM   #28
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It is probably more than I would want to take on as a first boat but it may make someone a nice classic boat if they don't mind the work. I agree the terms seem weird...How bout the buyer pay for haul out and then the guy just come down 1900 on price??? Maybe the boatyard owes the guy some money or something? Regardless I doubt I investigate further.
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:34 AM   #29
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As far as I know, the cost of the haul out and/or survey always fall on the buyer, whether he buys the boat or not. At least that has been our experience here in TX.


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Old 05-09-2015, 10:01 AM   #30
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Some of this post is a little off “boating” topic… but otherwise it’s on the mark… regarding wood rot, care, replacement, … in circumstances regarding wooden constructed boats.

When young; having spent many years working in boat yards in NY and Maine on wood boats, as well as being my dad’s right-hand-maintainer of our family’s several wood boats, I can attest to the fact that items built of wood can last virtually forever if ample diligence for care and wood (as well as fastener and paint/varnish) replacement schedules are well adhered to. Currently owning and often using really well constructed 1977 fiberglass Tollycraft tri cabin and a 1975 Crestliner tow behind runabout (as well as having had several other well built fiberglass boats previously) I can attest that caring for a wood boat is approximately 4X more effort than caring for fiberglass.

Soooo… here’s the off “boating” topic part regarding wood… but still on the mark - regarding wood rot, care, replacement.

We live in extremely rural area (town’s population amounts to 313 P.O. Boxes; no street address mail delivery. We’re just 40 minutes north of SF, CA with property/house/etc on the side of what could be called a small mountain (tall hill side – if you will). There are upper and lower one lane roads. Portion where house sits (down a bit off upper road) averages more than 7/12 pitch to the lower land area that somewhat flattens to meet the lower road (steep driveway carved in there to a sizable dozed flat land area below house, between roads. For a parking area (wood deck) aside and above house (22 stair steps to house porch/door is a 55 year old massive wood constructed parking platform that abuts and is firmly tied into the top and face of huge concrete retainer at edge of upper road. Steps from lower road to upper road elevation counts at 175 + +.

Anyway – back to wood rot, care, replacement:

The parking deck (beginning at level with upper road) can accept four large vehicles as well as storage shed(s)/boxes. Downhill end of deck has 14’ tall 6” x 6” posts that meet Simpson ties at 6” x 10” girders. There are four 32’ girders having 5 rows of same dimension posts whose length decreases toward concrete retainer at upper road, as well, much cored fasteners to retainer-wall and several alternating position sheer strengthener 2” x 12” angled planks and gussets etc for posts to girder/beams that support 16” o.c. 2” x 10” joists with 2” x “12 planking and wood guard rails on three sides of deck . Circumstance is - - > when originally constructed in 1960 this deck was built exclusively of Doug Fir… therefore no matter how diligently copper green has-been/is applied rot eventually takes over.

Sooo… I just want to say that – recently I had my crew do another substantial rot preventative and wood replacement sequence on this deck. I estimate that due to rot repair and preventative doings over the last 30 years (repairs happen about once every 7 years - as the remaining Doug Fir wood eventually fails, i.e. rots) that the deck is now approaching 70% content of all pressure treated wood parts.

The above wood rot story and my above that heritage of spending years working on wood boats enables me to knowledgably make this point: Anything made of wood can be replaced part by part over the decades. That Said - Eventually… nearly every piece of wood on a wood boat will need major maintenance or complete replacement. Whereas… well-built fiberglass boat parts will not – End of Story!

Happy Boat-Material Daze! - Art
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Old 05-09-2015, 11:35 AM   #31
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Attachment 40006Here is a more recent picture.

And if you wire me $15,000. Not only do you save $4,000, but you avoid all those legal complications of having to move the boat.

someone missed the boat...
they should of listed this one as a submarine..

HOLLYWOOD
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:06 PM   #32
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As far as I know, the cost of the haul out and/or survey always fall on the buyer, whether he buys the boat or not. At least that has been our experience here in TX.

Bob
Agree. It's not paying for the haulout I would object to if I were interested in this boat. It's paying $1900 for a haulout.
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:04 PM   #33
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Look at it this way, normally when you make an offer on a boat you put down 10% earnest money, $1900 in this case. Then you pay for the haul out and/or survey. If you buy the boat the earnest money is applied to the price of the boat but you are still out the haul out/survey cost. In his case, if you buy the boat he applies the $1900 to the purchase price and the haul out was free. Sounds like a deal to me.


Not sure about the requirement for an all cash transaction, that would give me some cause for concern.


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Old 05-09-2015, 09:43 PM   #34
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Well put - jw!

So that logic makes this boat 190 years old?

1918 Ed Monk Bridgedeck Cruiser
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:51 PM   #35
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How many boats built in 1918 have you seen around? Most have been in the boneyard for years now. How many fiberglass boats built in the 1970's will still be around in another 50 years?
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Old 05-09-2015, 11:12 PM   #36
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Look at it this way, normally when you make an offer on a boat you put down 10% earnest money, $1900 in this case. Then you pay for the haul out and/or survey. If you buy the boat the earnest money is applied to the price of the boat but you are still out the haul out/survey cost. In his case, if you buy the boat he applies the $1900 to the purchase price and the haul out was free. Sounds like a deal to me.


Not sure about the requirement for an all cash transaction, that would give me some cause for concern.


Bob
I hear you, Bob, but the earnest money is usually refundable pending a clean survey or any other reason mutually agreed to in the purchase offer. This seems designed to make it harder for a prospective buyer to walk away. A short haul should be a few hundred bucks which, if I were interested in the boat, I'd expect to pay. But I'd never agree to terms like these. Rather not pay almost $2K for the privilege of finding out the planks are soft or the hull is hogged, should that be the case.

Like to hear from a broker if this kind of arrangement seems fair to buyers.
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Old 05-09-2015, 11:36 PM   #37
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$1900 for a haul out?! The not-inexpensive boatyard (in the very expensive, i.e. San Francisco Bay Area) I employ charges $12 a foot for haul out, power wash, and return to water. For a 49-fot boat, that's $588!
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:06 AM   #38
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Location, location, location. When we bought our current boat, 38', the haul out was over $600, no power wash included. It was the only travel lift, and I use the term loosely, within about 100 miles.


I agree, if the purchase doesn't go through the earnest money is returned. But you're still out the haul out/survey fee.


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Old 05-10-2015, 09:15 AM   #39
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How many boats built in 1918 have you seen around? Most have been in the boneyard for years now. How many fiberglass boats built in the 1970's will still be around in another 50 years?
Probably depends on how they're maintained.

http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/a...chmentid=40006

I suppose we can make reefs from all the derelict plastic boats from the 70's.
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:32 AM   #40
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So – ya want ta know… read this documented article!

Then reread my post #30.

How Long do Fiberglass Boats Last?

http://www.ericgreeneassociates.com/images/Boat_Longevity.pdf
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