Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-09-2012, 10:03 PM   #1
Guru
 
City: coos bay
Country: usa
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,203
superior features of a wood vessel

what are the advantages of wood over plastic, etc.
__________________
Advertisement

bfloyd4445 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 10:44 PM   #2
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfloyd4445 View Post
what are the advantages of wood over plastic, etc.
Wood is the most beautiful material for fine interior boat finishes. IMHO - not for hulls and other exterior purposes due to its maintenance requirements and rot potentials.
__________________

Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 10:44 PM   #3
Guru
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Vessel Name: Anastasia III
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,716
You can put a nail in the hull anywhere to hang stuff.
Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 11:07 PM   #4
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,256
Wood belongs in the interior.

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 12:22 AM   #5
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
For a hull material - not much. One could argue that there are wood boats over 100 years old still afloat, and no glass boats that can make the same claim. While this may be true, I believe this is a moot point. Wood boats are a labor of love that require constant attention and maintenance compared to a glass boat.

Be prepared for more frequent surveys, possible replanking if a problem is found, higher insurance rates, higher labor costs, etc.
__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 12:24 AM   #6
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,685
The advantage of wood over plastic....that's an easy one. While those who own wood hulled boats are lovingly enjoying the sanding, refinishing, etc. of their beautiful popsicle stick hulls, those of us with Tupperware boats will be stuck aboard somewhere with an adult beverage firmly planted in our hand.

Now before any of you vote to toss me off here, let me say that I'm kidding. I love the beauty of a wood hulled boat and love wood interiors. But the fact is that I'm not THAT much of a DIY'er who gets off on maintaining wood. That's why I own a Tupperware boat.

Clint Eastwood said it best in one of his Dirty Harry movies...."A man's got to know his limitations." I know mine.
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 12:42 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Capn Craig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 418
Clint is a very smart fellow.
Capn Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 12:57 AM   #8
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Wood boats are stronger, lighter (or both to a lesser degree) quieter, usually easier to repair, better looking, more insulative, easier for a non-boat builder to build and because of the abundance of people that aren't aware of the real advantages of wood, wood boats are very cheap now.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 01:22 AM   #9
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,562
Other people`s wooden boats are a delight to look at. As Mark says, it is a very nice feature inside a boat.
But for me that`s about as far as it goes. Even wooden windows are prone to rot. I thanked my lucky stars my boat had foam sandwich decks during the current deck renovation; the 2 places teak was used in the deck substrate were soft, black, damp, and transferring moisture to the cabin.They were replaced with foam.
But I do like looking at wooden boats. I even go to wooden boat shows.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 01:51 AM   #10
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
BruceK,

It's a mistake to embalm wood in plastic as it needs to breath.

There are lots of wonderful cars to have and drive that are more trouble to maintain than a Toyota Corolla.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 02:06 AM   #11
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post

There are lots of wonderful cars to have and drive that are more trouble to maintain than a Toyota Corolla.
Eric, I`ve owned some of them. If I think of buying another Jaguar (remember the proud owners boast " drove 800km from Sydney to Melbourne and it only caught fire once") I have a cup of tea and a good lie down. If that ever fails I will seek medical help.
But I still like looking at wooden boats. "Just looking,thanks".
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 02:19 AM   #12
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
BruceK,

It's a mistake to embalm wood in plastic as it needs to breath.

There are lots of wonderful cars to have and drive that are more trouble to maintain than a Toyota Corolla.
Wood doesn't need to breathe.

The problem with glass over wood is that it's almost never done on a 100% dry hull.
__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 02:44 AM   #13
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
BruceK,

It's a mistake to embalm wood in plastic as it needs to breath.

.
Um.... no it doesn't. Witness the subdecks on most of our cruisers that are a sandwich of fiberglass-wood-fiberglass. No breathing there. When you varnish or Bristol or whatever a piece of wood all the way around, no breathing there.

The wood you make a boat out of is dead. It doesn't need to breathe. However it does need to be absolutely dry when you seal it up. If it's at all moist and you seal it up it can't dry out so it will eventually rot. But if it's absolutely dry when you seal it up, it will last forever or as long as whatever is sealing it remains moisture-proof.

See Pau Hana's post above for another cause of wood failure in glassed-over boats.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 04:32 AM   #14
Guru
 
dhmeissner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: North America
Vessel Name: The Promise
Vessel Model: Roughwater 35
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,325
Ok devils advocate time.

A wooden boat is more attractive. It looks like a boat, not a floating Winnebago.

A wood boat feels more solid. A wood boat though is lighter than the same displacement plastic boat, making it more efficient.A wood boat is much easier to modify. Because wood is able to absorb and release water, a wooden boat will actually get less condensation and dampness on it than a fiberglass one. This means less dampness to deal with inside and out.

Wooden boats actually need much less maintenance than plastic boats. Despite all the technology we have, a plastic boat will deteriorate continually, and there is little that can be done to prevent it. De-lamination, grinding and filling blisters is no fun. Then spending money on that barrier coat, then bottom paint as well.

The horror stories we all read about are on boats that there has been no maintenance for decades, not a properly maintained wooden boat.
__________________
Dave & Suzie - Roughwater 35
http://thepromiserwb1029.org/2012/09...the-promise-2/
dhmeissner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 05:24 AM   #15
Al
Guru
 
Al's Avatar
 
City: ketchikan, Alaska
Country: usa
Vessel Name: 'SLO'~BELLE
Vessel Model: 1978 Marben-27' Flybridge Trawler Pilothouse Pocket Cruiser[
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,690
Eric, I`ve owned some of them. If I think of buying another Jaguar (remember the proud owners boast " drove 800km from Sydney to Melbourne and it only caught fire once") I have a cup of tea and a good lie down. If that ever fails I will seek medical help.




Darn! BruceK had to go and do it!! I own a Jaguar XJS 94 4.0 coupe. O Lord, the money I have spent over the years and the many trips we have taken with our cheeks up around our ears as we wait for the next adventure! (Your kidding-Ha the last adventure had us waiting five days in Smithers B.C. for an alternator out of Edemonton Alberta. $485.00 for the alternator and 1/2 hour labor to install!! Thank Gosh there is a dandy golf course in Smithers!
Too- I recently sold our 53 year old wooden converted harbor tug . It was a labor of love but then I have a 16 foot Norwegian lapstrake that is over 50 years old, a 18 foot Polsbo Skiff that was built in 1936 which is powered by a one cyl. Yanmar diesel. All as it has been stated, are a work of love.
Now we have this Marben trawler. where the tug was 19,000 # the Marben is 10,000# It is a different boat for sure and is taking some time to become accustom to the difference.
With our little tug, it was always amazing to pull into a strange float/dock, and if the space were tight, and snoot full of confidence, make a "seine boat landing" where you make a quick approach drop it into nutral, spin the wheel and pull it into reverse, sucking the stern right into the float. 30 foot boat in a 34-36 foot space. Then the fun begins as those watching off the larger and vastly more costly large commodious million dollar (Over 30,000-100,000#) yachts, particularly the ladies on board, flock over with their cameras to take photos of this humble well appointed, highly varnished bright-work work boat/converted.
Aaaaa the pride of wood boat complete.
As others have stated, in more youthful manner, it is a fact of physical age that makes a convert out of years of maintenance that allows many of us aging boat bums to acknowledge the eventuality of listening to the siren of the sea in the form of fiberglass.


A.M.(Al) Johnson-Ketchikan
Marben 27' pocket trawler
Al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 06:20 AM   #16
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,518
"what are the advantages of wood over plastic, etc.


They are ysually really cheap to purchase , and frequently 10X to 100X as much work to maintain.

If NOT maintaines to perfection (no deck leaks) the boat will depart to rot heaven.

The big advantage to new wood construction is a custom (not a cookie) is no harder to build .

That is true in steel and aluminum too.

"Wood boats are stronger, lighter (or both to a lesser degree) quieter,"

I would agree would CAN BE stronger (tho its rare) and indeed they can be far lighter , at the cost of strength and longevity. Marine foam core GRP is quiet and insulated, but expensive.

Choose what you prefer.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 07:39 AM   #17
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Wood boats are stronger (design can change that), lighter (or both to a lesser degree) quieter (diagree but depends on design), usually easier to repair (depends on the repair and skills of the repairer and tools available), better looking (probably the ONLY difference I'll agree to), more insulative (not over cored plastic), easier for a non-boat builder to build and because of the abundance of people that aren't aware of the real advantages of wood (why build something that has so few advantages...I'd go metal first), wood boats are very cheap now (they are cheap because of having so few advantages and if it was properly cared for and looks good...it's more expensive than plastic) .
.................................................. .
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 08:07 AM   #18
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: Saint Augustine, Fl.
Country: Port of St Augustine ,FL
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,957
Wood boats won't burn as quick as a Fiberglass boat.
Easier motion in a seaway.
Sailor of Fortune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 11:10 AM   #19
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
An amazing amount of facts mixed in w endless opinions but it appears as long as a boat is designed well, constructed well and maintained well any universal building material will do fine.

I'll withdraw my "breathing" comment.

dhmeissner and Al,
Supporting an unpopular thing has it's doom, gloom and defeat moments but there is the joy, challenge and set the record straight satisfaction that comes by riding the dark horse and you guys have done well indeed. I like to do it and I like to see it done .. and done well.

As to rotting wood
Ask not what your boat dosn't do but what your boat can do.
A yacht is made to please and wood does it better.
How do I like my plastic boats? .. fine.
It's too bad a plastic boat isn't strong enough to stand by itself as it needs wood to hold it together.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 11:43 AM   #20
Guru
 
dhmeissner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: North America
Vessel Name: The Promise
Vessel Model: Roughwater 35
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,325
Ok I confess.

My RW35 has a fiberglass hull. I'm glad it does, the rest of the boat is wood and I'm happy about that. When I set out in pursuit of a RW35 I found one near Vancouver, and had it surveyed. It has a wooden hull that had been neglected. Cost to bring her back exceeded the asking price so I bailed. The near grand I spent saved me 30.

My San Juan 23 sailboat is also fiberglass. Someday I will have a wooden sailboat just because I want one. I'm a member...The Center for Wooden Boats
Great organization. I was part of the Puffin team one year, till I had to move overseas, I will be back this summer though and volunteer again.
Steam Launch: Puffin | The Center for Wooden Boats


__________________

__________________
Dave & Suzie - Roughwater 35
http://thepromiserwb1029.org/2012/09...the-promise-2/
dhmeissner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012