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Old 08-18-2011, 11:21 PM   #21
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

I'm with Bob (and I think someone else said the same) there is no leaping on our boat.* We have walkie talkies though we don't always use them,*depends on the situation.*

We have had our boat coming up on one year and I am really impressed with how good Matt is at docking.* We were pulling in to a new to us slip the other day with a lot of current running through (on a river) and he was nervous, said he was afraid he'd hit the dock / roof supports.* He pulled the boat in perfectly, didn't touch a thing.* Sure we have scrapped into the dock a few times in the past 11 1/2 months but we maintain an "it is only fiberglass" attitude and keep calm.* Everything works out.*

I cannot imagine not having our sundeck, both for the awesome cabin below and the deck space above.* We absolutely love it.*
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Old 08-19-2011, 12:42 AM   #22
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Nevertheless, I appreciate a flat, 360-degree deck for ease of quick movement on the boat.

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Old 08-19-2011, 07:47 AM   #23
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Sundeck in PNW?

Walk around side decks with side doors and a cockpit*with *a transom door*are a safe easy way to get on and off. Sure, an athlete can do anything, but as we grow older the body appreciates easy boarding brought about by a good boat design.

Sundecks have fallen from popularity and virtually non existent as a new build*- *this makes them a good value and appealing. This past week while at Gibson's in BC, I noted several Tolly 44s with a cockpit and a 40 without. Both versions docked easily as awaiting helping hands were on the dock. In adverse PNW weather (common) and no helping hands, good deck and transom access is nice to have, but more $$.

For you responders located in the gulf climate or SoCal, think cloudy, foggy, dark, wet and cold dockings for the Admiral as you traverse the PNW. My wife and I have done both and her PNW desires are unequivocal - easy access.

Also in the PNW, fishing and crabbing are popular. A cockpit makes these chores much easier, in fact a must for the serious.

Lastly, Nordhavns, Flemings,*Offshores and similar rule the waves as new builds we lust after. It is impressive to watch the Admiral gleam as she easily steps off one of these at a boat show.


-- Edited by sunchaser on Friday 19th of August 2011 07:52:12 AM
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Old 08-19-2011, 12:01 PM   #24
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
sunchaser wrote:
In adverse PNW weather (common) and no helping hands, good deck and transom access is nice to have, but more $$.

For you responders located in the gulf climate or SoCal, think cloudy, foggy, dark, wet and cold dockings for the Admiral as you traverse the PNW. ave done both and her PNW desires are unequivocal.

Also in the PNW, fishing and crabbing are popular. A cockpit makes these chores much easier, in fact a must for the serious.

Lastly, Nordhavns, Flemings,*Offshores and similar rule the waves as new builds we lust after. It is impressive to watch the Admiral gleam as she easily steps off one of these at a boat show.

--------------------------------------------------------------
All kidding aside, it really is nice to have helping hands when you're docking in strong winds and wet slippery docks in the PNW and a chance to pass on some boating skills to newer boaters.* We have a lot of guest boats on our dock. If I don't know the person I assume they are new to boating and I'm very careful, passing them the line only when at the dock and I point at the dock cleat while asking them to put a rap on it and hold the lines tail.* That keeps them from trying to pull the boat in and gives me a solid point on the dock to pull against with the engines if necessary. *They will sometimes say something like, "Wow. . . You made that look easy!" *and I respond pointing at them, "No, we made it easy." which often becomes a discussion on docking and line handling. *My son just shakes his head *and says I should join the Coast Guard Aux.*
I also keep the bow line out of their reach.* Each boat has its own handling characteristics.* The 37' and larger Californians have the bow cleat too far forward, around the curve of the bow. *Hauling this line in tight, pins the bow against the dock and no amount of force will bring the stern in until it is released.

Tom

You are right, we have our share of foul weather, but you have to admit the crabbing is once again PHENOMENAL this year. *Oh, also bring the Admiral and come on down to Anacortes, I have a new 60' Nordhavn three slips away, that I think you might like. *I believe I heard they were asking around $3M for her and its blocking my view! **

Larry B
*
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Old 08-21-2011, 12:46 PM   #25
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
Mgtdguy wrote:
New to the forum and to the PNW. We recently sold our sailboat and are now looking for a trawler (?). While searching I have noticed a number of sundeck boats and wondered if the lack of a cockpit on those in the 35'-38' range pose any particular problems with docking. I would appreciate any comments from owners of sundeck boats. In general, the more I look, the farther from finding THE boat I get! Trawlers, tugs, and some Tolly's are on the short list.
Hello Mgtdguy
*
Yep - Ain't boating FUN!* And, imho, power boating represents simple-easy-fun (especially in our 60s LOL).* Power boating offers reduced operational effort, more restricted waterway passage, and even some gunk-hole exploring, as well as considerable general relaxation time compared to sail boating; albeit maybe not as romantic (and inexpensive) as slipping through the open seas via cost free winds (cost free that is until sail, mast, rigging, and aux power source come into repair/replace needs).*
*
Most every item re docking and what type/style/model of midsized power boat is preferred has been covered in this thread.* Each to their own!* For comfort and cruising/hooking ease, I love twin screw tri cabin models (cockpit feature or not) with fly bridge and bimini tops covering both the bridge and sun deck... but no total enclosure, so that for low overhead locations like our covered slip, or severe wind conditions while in open areas, I can drop em into secure strapped down positions.* Of course PNW probably leans toward more personal weather protection needs than is required in our considerably protected SF Bay and Delta areas... but there can be height and high-wind restrictions with enclosures.* Of course, choosing the correct boat and features really is a compromise trade off!
*
My preferred boat makes (in order of appreciation): Tollycraft, Hatteras, Bertram, Uniflite... There are other great ones Ive noticed too, and many are represented on this forum / or in this thread.* Those I list are my current, recent, or years (some many decades) ago personal experiences! ****
*
Id simply like to add that Ive found piloting from any boats bridge, in any weather conditions, makes docking a slam-dunk as long as you have one hand aboard or on the dock... and of course appropriate lines readily in position for synching.*
*
The way I do it: Spring lines work wonders!* On both sides of a boat, each approx three feet (3) separated from exact amidships (six feet (6) total span between the two (2) spring line cleats), a boat can be easily initially affixed by any one or two of the spring lines from either side that is close to dock... therein holding the boat pretty much parallel with dock and making ready for the next sequence of motor actuated positioning (if necessary) and/or simply getting bow/stern lines attached.* In calm winds and slack tides docking using just the spring lines can be handled by a solo captain... as long as said Captain is nimble of joints and fleet of foot from bridge to spring line area to getting on the dock, with spring lines that are already well in position to easily work with.
*
Enjoy your upcoming Power Boat experience! *- Art*********

*
*
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Old 08-21-2011, 01:12 PM   #26
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Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
Art wrote:*
*
The way I do it: Spring lines work wonders!* On both sides of a boat, each approx three feet (3) separated from exact amidships (six feet (6) total span between the two (2) spring line cleats), a boat can be easily initially affixed by any one or two of the spring lines from either side that is close to dock... therein holding the boat pretty much parallel with dock and making ready for the next sequence of motor actuated positioning (if necessary) and/or simply getting bow/stern lines attached.* In calm winds and slack tides docking using just the spring lines can be handled by a solo captain... as long as said Captain is nimble of joints and fleet of foot from bridge to spring line area to getting on the dock, with spring lines that are already well in position to easily work with.
*
Enjoy your upcoming Power Boat experience! *- Art*********

*
*

*Like you, Art, Moonstruck has two spring lines port and starboard coiled and secured on the rail.* They are usually the first lines ashore or on a piling.* As you say spring lines work wonders.* You should be able to see them in the accompaning photo.

*


-- Edited by Moonstruck on Sunday 21st of August 2011 01:16:02 PM
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Old 08-21-2011, 04:51 PM   #27
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

And ditto on the springline.* Once that's secured nothing else matters.* If some Helpful Henry is standing expectantly on the dock waiting to grab the bowline, Marilyn quietly directs him to the stern line where he can't do too much harm.* Once I had to reach out and slap away a Helpful's hands that were grabbing the stanchions and once I had to lecture a harbormaster about leaving the bowline the hell alone but usually some quiet direction keeps the dockside line handlers safely*out of the way without them ever realizing what is happening.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:09 PM   #28
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:Art wrote:*
*
The way I do it: Spring lines work wonders!* On both sides of a boat, each approx three feet (3) separated from exact amidships (six feet (6) total span between the two (2) spring line cleats), a boat can be easily initially affixed by any one or two of the spring lines from either side that is close to dock... therein holding the boat pretty much parallel with dock and making ready for the next sequence of motor actuated positioning (if necessary) and/or simply getting bow/stern lines attached.* In calm winds and slack tides docking using just the spring lines can be handled by a solo captain... as long as said Captain is nimble of joints and fleet of foot from bridge to spring line area to getting on the dock, with spring lines that are already well in position to easily work with.
*
Enjoy your upcoming Power Boat experience! *- Art*********

*
*

*Like you, Art, Moonstruck has two spring lines port and starboard coiled and secured on the rail.* They are usually the first lines ashore or on a piling.* As you say spring lines work wonders.* You should be able to see them in the accompaning photo.

*



-- Edited by Moonstruck on Sunday 21st of August 2011 01:16:02 PM

*

Howdy Moonstruck Don! - Correct O' Peel!!* Spring lines are usually my first upon docking and last upon leaving.* Also great for holding boat close abreast dock while loading, working-on, off loading... etc...

While*growing*up*on boats along New England's Atlantic coast; heres an old mariners saying*I learned regarding break of winters heavy snow and making ready to take to the water again:

"Spring has sprung, the waves have riz, wonder how your spring line is!"

Cheers! - Art

*
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:14 PM   #29
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
bobofthenorth wrote:
And ditto on the springline.* Once that's secured nothing else matters.* If some Helpful Henry is standing expectantly on the dock waiting to grab the bowline, Marilyn quietly directs him to the stern line where he can't do too much harm.* Once I had to reach out and slap away a Helpful's hands that were grabbing the stanchions and once I had to lecture a harbormaster about leaving the bowline the hell alone but usually some quiet direction keeps the dockside line handlers safely*out of the way without them ever realizing what is happening.
*DITTO - Bob, I'm with you too *- Art!
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Old 08-22-2011, 09:06 AM   #30
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

The extra entire room added to the boat with a covered, enclosed sundeck, like mine, is way more than worth the minor line handling issues.
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Old 08-22-2011, 09:07 AM   #31
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
Mgtdguy wrote:
... and wondered if the lack of a cockpit on those in the 35'-38' range pose any particular problems with docking.
The right answer is.... it depends. It depends on where you plan to go and how you plan to use your boat.* As you probably know the majority of docks in the PNW use bullrails instead of cleats.* Unless there are people on the dock to help you--- and it's been our experience and observation that people on the dock are generally more a hazard than a help when it comes to docking-- you need to get a line around the bullrail when you arrive at the dock.* This is not easily done from the boat.

In my opinion, while a sundeck-stype boat (Grand Banks calls them "Motoryachts') does provide a lot of interior and exterior user room, you want one that also offers good and quick dock access.* A side door in the bulwarks forward of the full-width aft cabin or a transom door (or ladder) that lets you get quickly from the swimstep to the dock are features I would want in a sundeck boat for this area.

There are products that supposedly let you snag a bullrail with a hook-on-a-rope arrangement but the few times I've seen these used they didn't work as advertised and on a couple of occasions the hook flipped off the bullrail and came back to seriously ding the gelcoat on the boat.* So in my opinon, the best way to deal with a bullrail is to have the ability to step off the boat and get a line around it.* Low freeboard (as on a GB), a side door in a bulwark, or off the end of the swimstep seem to be the fastest and most reliable methods.*

Personally, I prefer a low freeboard and a walkaround deck for dealing with the docks up here so would not consider a sundeck/Motoryacht were we in the market for another boat in this area.* However there are plenty of boaters in this area who like sundeck-style boats and who have learned to handle them competently at a bullrail dock.*

The two photos are a typical docks in the Gulf Islands and having a wide(ish) walkaround deck and low freeboard aft makes a big difference, in my opinon, to the ease of getting our boat secure alongside when we arrive, particularly since wind or current or both may not allow much time to get this done.
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Old 08-22-2011, 11:25 AM   #32
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Some of us have found a compromise in a CPMY! OK so it's 47ft though.

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Old 08-22-2011, 01:08 PM   #33
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RE: Sundeck in PNW?

Quote:
Robin wrote:
Some of us have found a compromise in a CPMY! OK so it's 47ft though.

*Best of both worlds!
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