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Old 04-11-2009, 06:31 AM   #21
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

tgwhite,

Funny thing you* mention looking around the docks. I had to do some minor maintenance on my sailboat yesterday and when done did exactly that. One thing that such a exercise does is familiarize one with whats popular in your area. And yes, a top priority if not the first priority is resale and the ease of resale.

Tim
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Old 04-11-2009, 06:50 AM   #22
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

John,

I am not that familiar with Marine Traders but they are very popular in FL. I can't remember seeing one without loads of teak, but I'll take a look more closely at the ones you mentioned.

It seems that the Marine Traders I've seen here in FL seem to be less cared for than other trawlers and motor cruisers. It may be because the teak looks so bad and in FL unless you are willing to consider it a second job, maintaining lots of teak probably won't get done.

Mainship is a popular boat in this area, Tampa bay. In fact there is one just down the slip from me and I will engage the owner in conversation next time I see him. I didn't know Mainship was not considered a trawler, but my ignorance is showing again so I better take a closer look at this boat. Incidently, I'm not looking for a particular boat, trawler or motor cruiser. I'm just looking for a boat that will meet my #1 need: to have fun on the water without a lot of worries.* Silverton and Carver are also both popular boats in FL and neither are considered trawlers.

You mentioned: "We would like to get back into more of a trawler type boat....as good of a boat this Mainship has been".
I'm wondering, why?

Tim
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Old 04-11-2009, 02:54 PM   #23
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

Quote:
timjet wrote:


You mentioned: "We would like to get back into more of a trawler type boat....as good of a boat this Mainship has been".
I'm wondering, why?

Tim

Space!!!* And the aforementioned "cave effect" of being down below.* There just isn't enough space on this boat to give it that comfortable homey feel.* It has been a great boat in a day boat application.* The Mainship I am talking about is the one in my avatar.* It is an express cruiser/lobster boat/picnic boat style.* Like I said, a great day boat but not something I really want to spen a week or more on.*

There are different types of Mainships and what has made their name are their trawlers.....their 35ft Sedans in particular.* They have held their value well and have flattened out in the mid $100s.....so well outta your price range(and mine).* The Mainships I was referring to are the 34 foot ones that were made in the late 70s/early 80s.* They can very easily be found in that price range and they made a ton of them....which means there are a lot out there with plenty of support.* They have their issues of course*but they are single engined sedans with very little teak.* And I think $50k is in the "cream puff" range as you can find them all the way down into the $20s.* Mainship is owned by Luhrs....which also owns Hunter sailboats*and Silverton.....if that means anything to you.* My only knock against those Bayliners we are speaking of is an aesthetic one....and that is their dark interiors.* They all have dark wook with black trim...just looks yucky to me.* Other than that, they aren't bad.* ANd Marin was right.* I don't think you will ever find one as a single.* Most are powered by Hino engines which likely have a lot of support since there were so many of those boats made.* Hino was never popular here but they are extremely popular in Japan.* They were "bought out"(the American arm of it)*by American Diesel if I remember correctly which would be a BIG plus....but* I might be getting my companies crossed up.

I highly suggest you do an "advanced seach" on Yachtworld with all ofyour criteria.* Searching on there is an art in and of itself.* There are some amazing deals to be had right now!!!!

PS....Yanmars are great engines.

*
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Old 04-11-2009, 06:44 PM   #24
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

John,

You didn't mention the size of your Mainship, but I'm guessing it's one of the 34's. Before you posted your last message I was attempting to get more information on the 34. Seems they made 3 models the Mark I, II, and III spread over several years. They range in price from like you said a low of 20's to the high 50's up until about '85.

They have little teak, one engine and a sedan configuration, which I think is what I'm going to focus on. My wife has stated her wishes* for a walk through transom to accommodate easy entry for both us and our dogs and only a sedan seems to have that. I'm a little concerned about the space issue, but I'm moving up from a 29 foot sailboat so the 34 will seem big, at least at first.

One concern I have is about the v berth. I hate them. But I do recognize unless I'm willing to move up into the 38 ft range I will have to live with this.

Tim
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Old 04-12-2009, 04:49 AM   #25
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

Teak decks are not the maintenance nightmare most people who don't have them think they are. That said, they are not maintenance-free.


There are two styles of "Teak Decks".

The mostly problem free is the one you would find usually on a sailboat for 200 years or so.

This is seperiate 2x2 (or so) planks screwed or bolted to the deck frames , calked and then gooped with a compound to be tight. Wonderful, a leak is EZ to spot and EZ to repair.Heavy.

The other "teak deck" is actually a teak paint job over a plywood deck that may have a layer of fiberglass .

The problem here is the screws which fasten the teak to the ply (Chinese Composite) eventually fail as does the calking. This allows water into the plywood (frequently not even "marine") and the rot sets in. tO ADD INSULT TO INJURY MANY OF THE PLANKS ARE REALLY WIDE so what looks like 5 planks is actually one wide board that a 12 year old apprentice calked and plugged to look like planking , not just a plank.Frequently a 1/2 dozen screws is all that holds it in place , which plugs are dummies and which are the leakers is a grea GAME.

Same with deck houses and pilot houses , the thin layer of glass is punctured to install windows doors,ports, fittings and all eventually have the goop fail , AND THE ROT SETS IN.

IF a vessel has a GRP deck without a phoney teak paint job , it is a far better FL ( or anywhere) boat .

This will be found in most USA built boats , read Dave Pascoe!!!!!!!


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Old 04-12-2009, 09:25 AM   #26
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

Hey FF, the 3rd kind is what GB is doing now. They are glueing them down...no screws.


And Tim, yes you are right about the older Mainships. We gravitate to the Mk1 simply because it looks more "trawler like" with the cockpit overhang. The Mk2 and 3 look more like Sportfishes. If you do pursue thhese Mainships, lemme know. I do know a bit about them as I have shopped them heavily and a buddy of mine just bought one. He got a pretty clean one for $34k. I woulda bought it in a minute.
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Old 04-12-2009, 07:53 PM   #27
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

Quote:
timjet wrote:

Since ease of maintenance is high on my priority list along with economy of operating the boat, I think you have convinced me to stick with a single engine model which was my original thinking anyway.
Tim---

You touch on an important point in this comment, and that is that in the typical trawler in sizes up to at least 42 feet (again, my mindset tends to be the GB line) engine access is WAY better in a single than in a twin.* I'm 6'3" and I can "get around" to where I have to in the engine room of our GB36.* But with two big straight-six engines (FL120s may only be 120 horsepower but they ain't small) AND an old-generation (aka big) 7.5kw generator in there, getting around behind either of the engines is not a barrel of laughs.
We used to charter a GB36 with a single, straight-six Cummins engine and no generator, and the engine room had way more empty space in it than occupied space.
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Old 04-12-2009, 08:17 PM   #28
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Suggestions for a used trawler

With regard to teak decks, I've not seen the type FF describes, which has wider sheets of teak that are scribed, caulked, and plugged to look like multiple planks.

The teak decks over fiberglass subdecks I've seen are like ours, or the ones on Island Gypsies, etc. Each plank has a shallow step, for want of a better word, routed down each edge. So the planks are butted together along their lengths but the recessed step above the butt joint provides a groove for the sealant that keeps moisture from getting down through the butt joints. It's very important that the sealant not adhere to the bottom of the groove, only the sides. So tape (I was taught to use automotive striping tape but I don't know what the factories used) is laid down the bottom of the groove to keep the sealant from touching the wood.

In a properly applied teak deck, it's rare that water will actually seep down around a deck screw even if the plug above it is missing. But because the deck "works," and as the seam material gets older and more weathered, or if it wasn't applied correctly to begin with, one side or the other of a seam can pull away from the edge of the groove. This allows water do get down to the butt joint and then through to the fiberglass subdeck below. Once there, it can migrate around and if it encounters a deck screw it can migrate down into the wood core (if the deck has one) as FF describes.

This is why, when you wash a teak deck, you should always use salt water. If salt water gets down under the planks and down around a screw into the subdeck's wood core, it will be less likely to encourage dry rot. This is also why, on the advice of a shipwright we know who does a lot of work on teak decks, when we re-set a deck screw we always dip the tip of it in a non-adhesive sealant like Lifecaulk. Then when the screw is inserted, the Lifecaulk seals around the threads so if moisture does get under the planks it won't follow the screw down any further.

Higher end boats like GBs, Flemings, etc. now glue their teak decks down. The older style decking like the type that was installed on our boat did have a bedding/adhesive peanut-buttered all over the subdeck before the planks were laid down and screwed, but this material did not have sufficient adhesive power to hold the planks down on its own. Hence all the screws.

-- Edited by Marin on Sunday 12th of April 2009 08:18:05 PM
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Old 04-13-2009, 05:19 AM   #29
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RE: Suggestions for a used trawler

and as the seam material gets older and more weathered,

Yup, , sealants are good for 7-10 years , so the amount of work is ongoing , the loss for any lack of maint is huge and the repair is very very difficult.

Its NOT shmerering more goop , the teak must ALL be removed and the deck rebuilt structuraly.

Far too expensive to R&R , so our yards solution has been to simply lay a foam core deck on the existing deck.

And ithat AINT cheap, but will stand the full force of a breaking sea with out any hassles.

An all GRP boat is far less maint or risk to your wallet or life..

Caviat Emptor!

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Old 04-13-2009, 10:43 AM   #30
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Suggestions for a used trawler

Quote:
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Yup, , sealants are good for 7-10 years , so the amount of work is ongoing , the loss for any lack of maint is huge and the repair is very very difficult.
Well, no.* Our boat is 36 years old and the adhesive/sealant the factory put down before laying the teak planks is still good.* Even when we first bought the boat and many seams were separated or had been sanded away in spots, no water got down into the boat through the deck screws and there are no soft spots in the wood core of the fiberglass subdeck.. Of course Howard Abbey at GB used good wood back in 1973, so that's part of it.* We had the entire main deck regrooved and reseamed a couple of years after we bought the boat, and while it IS a long and tedious job, it is by no means difficult.


-- Edited by Marin on Monday 13th of April 2009 10:44:39 AM
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Old 04-15-2009, 04:25 AM   #31
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Suggestions for a used trawler

We had the entire main deck regrooved and reseamed a couple of years after we bought the boat, and while it IS a long and tedious job, it is by no means difficult.

ONLY if you do it before its needed. On the usual TT the time for prevention was many decaades AGO.

Once the water starts to dissolve the plywood under the glass in even one spot , the entire deck is questionable

-- Edited by FF on Wednesday 15th of April 2009 04:28:03 AM
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