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Old 07-28-2016, 10:08 AM   #1
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Styles of anchoring

This is a thread to discuss the pros and cons of different styles of anchoring. Here are the three styles for discussion. I want to look at this, not as this is what we do or what is common, but in a world just starting what would be the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Three styles.

Single bow anchor.

Two bow anchors.

Bahama anchoring. One bow anchor and one stern anchor
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Old 07-28-2016, 10:14 AM   #2
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We use a single bow anchor.

In our area with 10' tide changes using a stern anchor has sunk boats.
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Old 07-28-2016, 10:44 AM   #3
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Do what others I the anchorage do. Less conflict that way.

On my own I use a single on the bow except once during a small hurricane. Then I used two on the bow
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Old 07-28-2016, 10:56 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
We use a single bow anchor.

In our area with 10' tide changes using a stern anchor has sunk boats.
So you're saying that if one uses bow and stern in an area of 10' tidal changes, they would need to allow much greater slack? If they allowed enough for the boat to rise and lower the 10', then wouldn't seem to be an issue. Much like tying a boat at a fixed dock or in a fixed slip.

On a single anchor, the issue with such a tidal change would simply be the amount of rode and having enough at low tide so that at high tide you'd still have adequate. Plus I guess in reverse when having enough at high tide, not then swinging into something at low tide.

On the east coast, much of Georgia has 8' tidal changes and it catches South Florida boaters by surprise. In South Florida we're just dealing with rising tides, projected based on recent history to rise another 2' by 2060.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:17 AM   #5
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A Bahamian moor doesn't really use a stern anchor as both are tied to the bow...just 180 degrees to each other.

It was developed for anchoring in the narrow cuts between islands that had tidal flow change and you couldn't swing out of the narrow cut....not really for conserving room.

Anchoring from the stern is not as dangerous for larger boats as it is made out to be in safety courses for smaller boats...but Kevin is correct that a stern anchor will limit the ability for the boat to float ahead towards the bow anchor as the tide rises and will pull one end or the other down. Unless of course there is enough slack or scope.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:49 AM   #6
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Ninety nine percent of the time I use a single, good anchor even in reversing current situations.


I have used two anchors off of the bow once or twice and they always ended up twisted. The only real use for two is in a Bahamian moor where the current reverses and the channel is tight. Not many opportunities for this.


I have used a stern anchor once or twice. The one time I recall doing it was off of Catalina Island to keep the bow pointed into the swells, just like the fore and aft moorings nearby.


There is perhaps a fourth anchoring technique: two anchors in tandem off of one rode. This technique increases the holding power or the single anchor and doesn't cause twisting of the rode and can deal with a wind reversal like in a hurricane when the eye passes overhead. If I had to ride out a hurricane and had plenty of real estate, this is what I would do.


The first anchor in the series has to have an appropriate eye to shackle the second anchor to. A Bruce followed by a good plow like a Rocna would be a great tandem team. The Bruce will act as a kellet and keep the rode parallel to the bottom for the second anchor and add holding power of its own. The recommended practice is to shackle the two together with 20' of chain.


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Old 07-28-2016, 12:05 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
A Bahamian moor doesn't really use a stern anchor as both are tied to the bow...just 180 degrees to each other.
.
You are correct. My mistake. Still the three choices. Single, two from bow, one from bow and one from stern.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:23 PM   #8
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My first choice is always a single anchor. Usually there is plenty of swing room where I go and where I have been. I am all chain so I can shorten up if necessary but my preference is still to be close to 10:1.

Advantage is you swing like everyone else whose on a single (usually 98%), and no worries about tangling twisting the two lines when you change directions.

On some occasions I have used two from the bow, but only in very windy conditions with poor holding ground. When I do this they are spread at around 30-45 degree angle (sorry no protractor to get exactly LOL).
Then after the wind settles or when it's time to leave I break one out with the dinghy and untwist off the bow (my secondary that is line and chain).

A couple of times I have used a stern anchor when sterning to a beach, etc., but that's extremely rare for me. Below I am stern to in Canada because most other boats were.


Bottom pic is single anchor in Block Island's salt pond
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:33 PM   #9
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After dragging in a tropical storm with three anchors out at Allans Pensacola Cay,I switched to tandem.

My tandem set up has been tested in two other tropical storms and works extremely well, easy to deploy an retrieve. Other than major storms ..... one bow anchor.

The only place I have used a Bahamian moor is in Beaufort NC where one is forced to because of the clutter of private moorings and that's what everybody else does. I have two badly mangled fingers caused by getting them caught while trying to unwind that twisted mess.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:40 PM   #10
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So we're talking what we do. Other than needing to allow for tidal variation what is the disadvantage of using a bow and a stern anchor? And I'm asking on the basis of everyone doing so, not just one boat.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:47 PM   #11
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The major downside to stern anchoring in my experience is where that anchor needs to be placed for what you want it to do and will it hold and can it be retrieved.

Once in Tangier Island. The wind and tide combo brought me unconfortably close to a shallows and crab structure. So I rowed out a stern anchor. IT WAS A REALLY undersized bruce, but held the boat in a good position overnight.

In the morning when time to leave, I dang near couldn't get that anchor up with the dingy and it was in too shallow water at low tide to retrieve from the big boa I did finally work it loose.

The forces pulling on that stern anchor can be substantially more than one rigged to the bow. So pulling it intentionally or dragging it could be an issue that is hard to estimate due to a newer set of variable for you.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:50 PM   #12
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Another pro of the Bahamian style is that a anchor's load would never change more than 90 degrees with wind and current shifts, making them less likely to trip. That said, in my limited travels I have never needed to employ it, if the anchorages on the Chesapeake are too crowded for me to fit in with a single anchor's swing, a shorter swing of the Bahamian would have me out of synch with everyone else. If anything it would allow me to anchor on the edge of the anchorage outside of everyone else's swing, but it is easier to find another cove. I've only employed the Bahamian for the basic cruising classes I teach and occasionally anchor my runabout off a beach using a bow and stern anchor. A significant con to the bow & stern anchoring would be the potential of becoming side to waves or heavy current, but this since it is often used to hold a position close to a shoreline, you are unlikely to experience waves traveling away from or truly parallel to the beach.
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Old 07-28-2016, 01:16 PM   #13
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One anchor deployed from the bow.
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Old 07-28-2016, 02:10 PM   #14
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For us it depends, either just a bow or bow and stern. If it is just our boat, or maybe us and one rafted to us, and plenty of room to swing, and no major worries about wakes from other boats, then just the bow. But for us, that is the exception. Where we boat and anchor, there is a ton of traffic on the weekends, so we usually put out a stern to keep our bow toward the channel and all of the wakes. We also often raft with a bunch of other boats. When we do a big raft-up, the rule is every other boat puts out an anchor. If we didn't use stern anchors, we would have a real mess assuming the boats would turn with the tides. So, in sum, for our area and the way we boat, it is usually a bow and stern.

As for getting the stern up (as mentioned in another post), if it is really stuck, we will back onto it and use the big boat to break it loose. But, usually, I find if I go out to it on the dinghy and keep the line really tight, after a few minutes of boucing around with wakes, it will work itself loose. Just have to give it time. One of our friends lost his Fortress stern anchor when he tried to break it loose with the big boat - he had it cleated off to the stern platform and the line broke. We have yet to find it.
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Old 07-28-2016, 02:20 PM   #15
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One anchor deployed from the bow.
But you have 1000 anchors from which you choose.
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Old 07-28-2016, 02:22 PM   #16
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BanB no only six.

I'm going to respond to the word "style".

I like to have Chris at the helm w the window open so she can hear me. And of course she can see me to get my hand signals.
Over at the window I look at the anchorage around me and on the GPS. I choose a place for the anchor with swinging room w enough water for low tide. At the window I direct Chris to the chosen spot and stop. With no way I launch the anchor taking care not to hit the boat w the anchor. With my rubber gloves on I use the gloves as a brake or go hand over hand until I feel the anchor touch down. I signal Chris to engage reverse gear and a moment after I observe stern way I put the anchor back on the bottom and commence paying out rode at a rate that will come close to putting the rode down on the bottom in a relatively straight line. With a slow walking speed astern I signal Chris to put the gear in neutral an continually give her stop and go signals to maintain the slow walking pace. When the marks on the rode indicate there is sufficient line out for the predetermined scope I quickly pull up a few feet of line and make it fast to the dedicated anchor rode cleat. I let the anchor stop the boat and engage reverse gear at idle rpm. Then I have Chris go to neutral and after 10 seconds or so we go back into reverse gear and let the anchor "soak" for about a minute. Back to neutral and back to reverse at 1400rpm .. for about one minute. Anchor set.
If very strong winds are expected I'll pull and soak a time or two more and up to about 2500rpm in reverse. My Michigan MP prop makes about the same thrust in reverse as in fwd gear.
Retrieving the anchor I pull the boat up to the anchor w the capstan if there is little wind. Ten knots of wind or more and I have Chris go in and out of gear to keep a bit of slack or low tension on the line and don't use the capstan at all until more or less directly above the anchor. If the anchor comes up easily the capstan and I pull the anchor and rode up and secure all. If not we pull up all the slack and tie off and then apply some power to work the anchor out.

I store the rode in a box on deck and now my working anchor fits in the box w all the rest of the rode. The only thing remaining on the bow is the bow roller. As I like it. I stow my XYZ storm anchor on deck ready for an emergency w either the working rode or the spare stowed in the anchor locker. Haven't had that rode out in years.
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Old 07-28-2016, 02:41 PM   #17
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So we're talking what we do. Other than needing to allow for tidal variation what is the disadvantage of using a bow and a stern anchor? And I'm asking on the basis of everyone doing so, not just one boat.
For me it would mean that if I had a wind shift of 90 degrees, as when a bad tx storm runs through, I have little holding power when the wind hits me broadside.
I'd end up in a tangled mess.
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Old 07-28-2016, 03:21 PM   #18
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Re Jay's post #17 with a transverse wind anchors fore and aft have little holding power until the anchors are dragged together or nearly so.

Fore and aft anchoring anticipating reversing river current or similar means the boat will hang on one or the other anchor and no holding power advantage will be experienced from the extra anchor.
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Old 07-28-2016, 03:52 PM   #19
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This is a thread to discuss the pros and cons of different styles of anchoring. Here are the three styles for discussion. I want to look at this, not as this is what we do or what is common, but in a world just starting what would be the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Three styles.

Single bow anchor.

Two bow anchors.

Bahama anchoring. One bow anchor and one stern anchor
The biggest, baddest anchor you can carry, chain to match and a proper snub line.
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Old 07-28-2016, 04:21 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
This is a thread to discuss the pros and cons of different styles of anchoring. Here are the three styles for discussion. I want to look at this, not as this is what we do or what is common, but in a world just starting what would be the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Three styles.

Single bow anchor.

Two bow anchors.

Bahama anchoring. One bow anchor and one stern anchor

We deploy one appropriately-sized anchor (ASA) from the bow. (ASA, to me, means a storm anchor, matched to the target substrate, in a weight I could lift manually if necessary.)

I would like to have a choice of two of those ASAs on the pulpit, in two different designs, so I can choose which might be more suitable for the immediate situation (mostly about holding substrate). Our pulpit doesn't offer that option, so we live with it. I still do have another ASA that I can deploy should that be necessary, but we've not had to make that change.

We are prepared to do a Bahamian moor (two ASAs from the bow) but have never had to do that... and doing that would also depend on who else is in the anchorage and how best we can manage similar swing distances and directions. I would probably use a modified approach, more like 90 opposed instead of 180. Depends on the anchorage and the reason for using this style.

Lots of current discussion in the other thread about tandem anchors, essentially two from the bow but on the same rode. I am not prepared to do that. Yet. Maybe. Seems like it offers some advantages to the Bahamian system. One is about not fouling two rodes. Also seems like even more work, though. Still studying that.

I can deploy a stern anchor, but haven't had to do that. Er... except once, when we did have to (later) deploy a kedge from the stern, to keep from swinging the stern up onto an oyster reef at low tide. (I misunderstood the tides near Beaufort...)


Are you folks intending to do more anchoring out soon?

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