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Old 06-02-2019, 10:25 AM   #1
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A Story You Will All Be Interested In Reading

Home-Carnage in Big Majors, Bahamas
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:45 AM   #2
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Sounds like every other anchorage story in squalls that produce more turbulence than expected....with expected results.


A sad story...but a common one. The trick is to figure out how to avoid them.....and that means you must study everyone and promise you will never think like others, including some apparently qualified, experienced captains.



And even then.... the most improbable things can happen.....it's how you plan to and extrictate yourself from situations that minimize or eliminate unwanted results.
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:48 AM   #3
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Except, they are right. It is very unusually to see two or three mega yachts rafting together, with attendant CCs, off one anchor.
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:54 AM   #4
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Have never understood why people risk rafting up, with the exception of very protected anchorages.

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Old 06-02-2019, 10:57 AM   #5
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Who is right? Anchotring in the same anchorage or staying where an unsafe situation exists has it's dangers. The comment that mega yachts have adequate anchors is like saying mega yachts and captains are always perfect...just like commercial guys/fishermen....and cruise ship captains...who daily prove otherwise.
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:59 AM   #6
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I recall taking my SeaRay to Put-in-bay Islands in Lake Erie in the early 80s and we were required to raft on busy weekends. Didn't like it but no choice.
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Old 06-02-2019, 11:07 AM   #7
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Unfortunately, not all that surprising, even as disappointing as it is. I've seen so many cases of large yachts tossed ashore or into rocks and been in dismay they didn't have anyone on watch. I see so many mistakes in this whole scenario and mostly mistakes of complacency and laziness.

I've been accused of being excessively conservative in such situations but a few things that just strike me. First, I would never raft as the megayachts did. Anchors aren't designed, however large, for multiple boats nor do they protect against the interaction of the boats. If someone pulls in closer to me than I'm comfortable, either they agree to separate further or I move.

Second, I know it's common to leave tenders in the water. Not only is it an open invitation to theft but it complicates all situations. On a boat like the Feadship and Broward for the crews to retrieve and relaunch the tenders is just not a big task. They might say they have their eyes on them, but clearly did not.

That brings to my major objection. The 128' Broward likely had a crew of 7 and the 150' Feadship likely 10 or 11. I don't understand with crews that size on boats that size, not having a crew member on watch. You're not just watching your boat but watching others. Seems the smaller boats alerted themselves to potential danger more quickly than the two megayachts.

The megayachts are used to anchoring in exposed conditions as they often have to anchor and tender in to shore or port. They are fully capable of anchoring and holding in conditions such as encountered. They simply underestimated the risks based on conditions during the day.

Then we get to the damages. I imagine foreign crews and foreign ownership. Easy to identify the owners, difficult to hold them accountable. Likely each boat owner having to file with their own insurer and entrust their insurer to go after the responsible parties. Did anyone report this to the Bahamian Coast Guard? I certainly would have hoped so and they would have come and taken charge. They have the authority to take control and prevent the boats from leaving until satisfied.

If not, the path is long and difficult and may require winning in a maritime court proceeding and then ultimately having the guilty boat arrested in a port somewhere.

For all those who say they're safe boaters and don't need insurance, this is a reminder that even if you are, the other guy may not be. I see the one boat as likely a total loss by the time you add it all up.

I wonder if the megayachts owners were aboard of if they were under charter. I know the Broward is largely a charter yacht with a crew of 7.
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Old 06-02-2019, 11:11 AM   #8
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Surprised I did find something of interest.
Looks like the anchor rode on a sizable boat is attached to the bow at the WL. Do they decrease scope doing that? Wonder how they retrieve the rode and anchor?
Could it be?
The boat is the one w a pink kayak.
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Old 06-02-2019, 11:17 AM   #9
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Willy, that is the snubber point.

The anchor is still deployed as usual, then that line is attached to the chain at the bow and lowered, giving a waterline stress point, rather than having the snubber on a deck cleat.

Many boats either have it at build or retro-fit one
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Old 06-02-2019, 11:29 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Surprised I did find something of interest.
Looks like the anchor rode on a sizable boat is attached to the bow at the WL. Do they decrease scope doing that? Wonder how they retrieve the rode and anchor?
Could it be?
The boat is the one w a pink kayak.
Everything done with windlass like any other setup.
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Old 06-03-2019, 11:37 AM   #11
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The owners/operators of Kya, the boat that the big boats dragged into, are friends of ours. They are about to be hauled for repairs. What a giant hassle, and fortunate nobody was hurt. One of the big boats has actually had the balls to suggest Kya was at fault. I guess the best defense is an aggressive offense.
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Old 06-03-2019, 11:41 AM   #12
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Can't say I did anything but gloss over it all.... but if they anchored after and close and in general a bad spot...they could be partly at fault....thus one of my previous posts....
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Old 06-03-2019, 01:30 PM   #13
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One time I awoke with some other boat's anchor at my pulpit. With tight lines, imagine how to extricate from that.
Another time, we witnessed a sailboat whizzing by at anchor in Honeymoon Har., which is a pretty terrible place for secure anchoring. Nighttime adds to any confusion too.

All chain rodes can be a real pain when you really need to break off fast.
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Old 06-03-2019, 01:38 PM   #14
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Hit MOB and let the chain go ....even small fiberglass jobs cost less than many anchors and chain.
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Old 06-03-2019, 01:56 PM   #15
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This is the kind of thing that demands some practice. From the word GO, a driver needs to be in position, engines ON, and a forward person needs to de-snub the chain, run it all out until its gone or turns into nylon, cut the rode, and then figure whats next. Was the all-chain rode tied off securely down below?? Fending off, boathooks if the problem child is a small boat. Spotlights on the correct target if its dark. watch out behind too; With this amount of mayhem, there will be loose lines in the water, asleep captains that need waking up, rocks at the stern, prepare to dive in with a knife in ur teeth. yeah... It just took once and its still pretty vivid in my memory.

Oh, and its usually in the middle of a thunderstorm at 3am; that's why it is so windy.
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Old 06-03-2019, 02:07 PM   #16
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That's why I try to eliminate as many of those possibiities that I can.
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Old 06-03-2019, 03:17 PM   #17
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My opinion is the reason the crews on these bigger boats or not more attentive is they are not the the owners and have no real financial responsibility ,of course their jobs could be at stake but that is of little consequence if they total the boat that you spent everything you have to own and repair. Possibly the captain is the only person on the mega yacht over 25 years old
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Old 06-03-2019, 04:13 PM   #18
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So who investigates this, if at all?
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Old 06-03-2019, 04:59 PM   #19
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My opinion is the reason the crews on these bigger boats or not more attentive is they are not the the owners and have no real financial responsibility ,of course their jobs could be at stake but that is of little consequence if they total the boat that you spent everything you have to own and repair. Possibly the captain is the only person on the mega yacht over 25 years old
Wifey B: That sounds like words coming from someone who hasn't met that many yacht crew members. They're like any other people, some diligent, some not. Those on charters are working in hopes of nice tips so they tend to do all they can to please the guests. Otherwise, they're working for the owners who are on board and they want to make them happy. The crews aren't anchored in the Exumas alone typically, but either owners or charter guests too.

Also, not as young as you imagine either typical crew of 7 would have 3 under 25 probably. Crew of 11, perhaps 4 under.

That no one is on watch is Captain issue.

I know quite a few in the industry and the ones I know are very diligent. They also talk of others, some good, some not. Like any other group of people.

As to the damage to them of a disaster, it's not just loss of current job, as news spreads rapidly and future jobs in jeopardy.
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Old 06-03-2019, 05:04 PM   #20
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So who investigates this, if at all?
Royal Bahamas Defence Force and US Coast Guard likely work together if deemed worthy of investigation. No injuries or loss of life and boats not underway so I doubt any investigation other than by insurers.
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