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Old 05-18-2018, 12:24 PM   #1
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Storing lines?

In my old boat I made use of some polyform line straps to make it easier to store the lines. I screwed them into the back wall of the lazarette. Made for a quick way to get the lines out without untying anything, while hanging them allowed them to dry.

I saw this posted somewhere and wonder if anyone else has tried something like it.

The downside would be having to tie/untie the lines from the rails. Especially while standing over an open locker. I could double up using rails like that and then the straps but then I'd hanging the lines pretty low once the hatch was closed.

Anyone else come up with a novel solution for stowing lines in a cockpit locker?
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Old 05-18-2018, 04:45 PM   #2
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We have two SS hooks mounted on the underside of the hatch near the top when it is open. Half way down are very small SS eyes which very small bungees hook into. The lines are hung on the hooks and the bungee is drawn across the coil, holding the lines in place when the hatch is closed. Works really well and is easy. We have two of the same hooks mounted on the aft wall of the cabin facing the cockpit to serve as more line storage. Not on the boat so no photo. If I remember, Iíll try and get one some time.

https://www.thehardwarehut.com/catal...ABEgKXm_D_BwE#
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Old 05-18-2018, 05:25 PM   #3
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I don't ever store my lines when they're even damp. If they're wet I hang them over one of the steps on the ladder to the flybridge. After a couple of days I'll bring them down, coil them over my forearm and toss them in a storage locker on the transom.
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Old 05-18-2018, 05:58 PM   #4
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Greetings,
Mr. GFC. Dry lines, for sure. We have a dedicated locker in the v-berth for extra line storage. Working lines are secured to rails on deck using line hangers...

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Old 05-18-2018, 06:17 PM   #5
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Greetings,
Mr. GFC. Dry lines, for sure. We have a dedicated locker in the v-berth for extra line storage. Working lines are secured to rails on deck using line hangers...

That's how we rolled too.
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Old 05-19-2018, 08:11 AM   #6
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I have had this one for over 38 years and it works great. Never have to worry about wet lines. They are always dry, coiled and ready for the next destination. If you can find one like this I would highly recommend it.
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Old 05-19-2018, 09:10 AM   #7
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I agree I picked this one about 27 years ago.

But all kidding aside I would love a better way but if they are in the locker they are dry
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Old 05-19-2018, 08:42 PM   #8
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I have them on the starboard hand rail (the Marquipt steps are under the port handrail). They were originally on velcro but I am replacing those with the rubber reusable twist ties from Home Depot. which work extremely well.
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Old 05-20-2018, 12:21 AM   #9
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Well shucks... that's what today's article is about. Well, that and small boat stuff -- using old halyards to make dock lines. It's what I did last autumn in anticipation for the February thing. That didn't work out for me, I'm sad to say.

But I digress...
After rinsing with fresh water before being stashed I hang them in the cockpit:


I would prefer to put away salt-free dry lines.

Once dry I installed two eye-bolts in my starboard cockpit locker. A line between the two supports the flaked lines:

(flaked, not coiled)

The article is here: Docklines from Halyards (snubber too) article on janice142
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Old 05-20-2018, 07:49 AM   #10
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A fellow dock mate in Maryland made two canisters from 8"PVC pipe that fit perfectly in the fender holders on the bow. The bottom had a few holes so the canister could drain. Although I thought it was genius, we still haven't implemented it yet. It fit so well, I thought it was professional. Just a section of pvc and two caps though. ...
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Old 05-20-2018, 08:59 AM   #11
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A fellow dock mate in Maryland made two canisters from 8"PVC pipe that fit perfectly in the fender holders on the bow. The bottom had a few holes so the canister could drain. Although I thought it was genius, we still haven't implemented it yet. It fit so well, I thought it was professional. Just a section of pvc and two caps though. ...
That is a great Idea
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Old 05-20-2018, 09:14 AM   #12
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A fellow dock mate in Maryland made two canisters from 8"PVC pipe that fit perfectly in the fender holders on the bow. The bottom had a few holes so the canister could drain. Although I thought it was genius, we still haven't implemented it yet. It fit so well, I thought it was professional. Just a section of pvc and two caps though. ...
Not sure that rigging up something with PVC is all that great an idea for being out in direct sunlight. Most PVC piping isn't rated for direct UV exposure and it'd get brittle over time. That and I'd think better airflow would be preferable instead of just resting inside a tube.
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Old 05-20-2018, 04:49 PM   #13
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I mentioned how the PO had setup some line storage on Kinship, but here is a photo. You can see the three small SS eyes that are screwed into the hatch. There are small bungees that were trapped in the center eye and used to hold the lines against the hatch cover when closed. The lines have never come off and there is enough ventilation in the hatch that they always dry out nicely.
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:16 AM   #14
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I mentioned how the PO had setup some line storage on Kinship, but here is a photo. You can see the three small SS eyes that are screwed into the hatch. There are small bungees that were trapped in the center eye and used to hold the lines against the hatch cover when closed. The lines have never come off and there is enough ventilation in the hatch that they always dry out nicely.
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Yes, I think that's the route we're going to take as well. The use of bungees to help hold them up, and being hung from hooks should offer the least complicated way to store and retrieve them. Coil them as per usual, on a hook and then snap the bungee across the lower section. The only downside/question is how many hooks. A rail would allow more, but then we're back to tying them off.

Of course in digging through various hatches I discover one or two are missing their little cam that holds them down to the deck. Looks like I'll have a few pieces to get from Izerwaren. That and the gas lift strut on one has quit.
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Old 05-21-2018, 02:47 PM   #15
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Yes, I think that's the route we're going to take as well. The use of bungees to help hold them up, and being hung from hooks should offer the least complicated way to store and retrieve them. Coil them as per usual, on a hook and then snap the bungee across the lower section. The only downside/question is how many hooks. A rail would allow more, but then we're back to tying them off.

Of course in digging through various hatches I discover one or two are missing their little cam that holds them down to the deck. Looks like I'll have a few pieces to get from Izerwaren. That and the gas lift strut on one has quit.

You will notice that the hooks are rather large. I can loop three coils of 5/8" line on each one. If you look close you will see that there is a stainless eye between the hanging coils and then one on either side. The bungee is trapped in the center eye and stretched from center out over the coil. That way there is never a loss of the bungee. One of them needs to be replaced. It was there when I bought the boat and I think is probably about 7 years old.


FWIW, I have two of those same stainless hooks on the back wall of the saloon mounted one above the other on the port side. It is just on the other side of the ladder to the fly-bridge. I usually have four lines hanging on those two hooks and just leave them there. Those lines are adequate for most of the docking we do when traveling. Our home dock has permanent lines that stay on the dock. It is under cover, easy to grab, they don't go anywhere, and are out of the way. Rain will get them wet, but they dry out. I use the lazarrette hatch to store additional lines that I may need.
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Old 05-21-2018, 06:25 PM   #16
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We just hang them off the aft cabin rails with a clove hitch. Half port, half starboard.
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:36 PM   #17
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We just hang them off the aft cabin rails with a clove hitch. Half port, half starboard.
Same here...both sides.
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Old 05-31-2018, 02:54 PM   #18
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We have two SS hooks mounted on the underside of the hatch near the top when it is open. Half way down are very small SS eyes which very small bungees hook into. The lines are hung on the hooks and the bungee is drawn across the coil, holding the lines in place when the hatch is closed. Works really well and is easy.
On my Eastbay there's a curved stairway coming down the flybridge. I've used that several times now to store lines. A gasket coil and then the running end tied off to a rail. Works well for drying wet lines but not how I'd like to store them longer-term.

Sugatsune also makes one with an additional inward curve to the hook. But it's triple the price!

https://www.thehardwarehut.com/catal...php?p_ref=9717

My interest is in having the lines staying on the hook through bumpy conditions. No sense arranging to put the lines on hooks only to have them fall off and then have to climb down to retrieve them. That and my forward bow lockers don't really have enough length to accommodate the lines laying fully against them when open. That inward hook part better allow for dropping the lines over it and not having to use bungies at all.
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