Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-28-2015, 01:52 PM   #1
Guru
 
hmason's Avatar
 
City: Westport, CT
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Magic
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 46 Europa
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,906
Storage in Engine Room

Just read an interesting article on engine room safety. Among the tips, it stated that spare lube oil stored in the ER was a fire hazard. I've been storing about 13 -16 gallons of engine oil in the ER. I always keep enough for a complete oil change and a gallon or two of make-up oil. Now I'm concerned that this is a bad/dangerous practice. What do others think? Here's a link to the article:
Engine Room Safety
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Howard
Magic, 1996 Grand Banks Europa
Westport, CT and Stuart, FL
hmason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 01:59 PM   #2
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Fiberglass and wood are fire hazards...that is what my engine room is made out of.

Mt fuel is in poly tanks and diesel is more flammable than oil.

Stored oil in my engine room is the least of my worries.

Too many writers...too few real topics.....how about writing about the beat way to sore it or how to prevent the fire in the first place.....other than dropping your wrench on you battery terminals.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 05:02 PM   #3
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,313

Yeah. It would be far better stored under my bed. NOT
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Blog: https://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 05:19 PM   #4
Guru
 
No Mast's Avatar
 
City: Atlantic Highlands, NJ
Country: US
Vessel Name: Moana Huaka'i
Vessel Model: Selene 53
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 816
Things we keep in the engine room outside of a toolbox:
- Oil 1 Gal
- Coolant 1 Gal
- 2 Racor elements
- 2 paper towel rolls
- 1 garbage bag

If the engine room is going to catch fire, it will so regardless of these things being there or not.
No Mast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 05:26 PM   #5
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,376
With our DeFever the ER storage is pretty good. so now we are hearing minimal ER size is less a fire hazard since less stuff we need can be stored there?
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 05:39 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
waddenkruiser's Avatar
 
City: Southern Baltic
Country: Europe
Vessel Name: Sømarken
Vessel Model: AMS 40'
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 183
We store in the engine room:
~ 30 liters engine oil, ~ 5 liters ATF, ~ 5 liters anti freeze concentrate.
And there are the fuel tanks besides the engines, carrying ~ 1500 liters diesel (flash point at 60 degrees C). So we really don't care about the 30 liters of engine oil ...

Does anyone have any experience (good or bad ones) with automatic fire extinguishers mounted in the engine room?


best regards / med venlig hilsen
wadden
__________________
best regards / med venlig hilsen
Wadden
waddenkruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 05:44 PM   #7
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by waddenkruiser View Post
Does anyone have any experience (good or bad ones) with automatic fire extinguishers mounted in the engine room?
No experiences (hopefully never) but it seemed like a no brainer good idea so we installed one this year.
__________________
David Hawkins
Deer Isle, Maine
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 05:58 PM   #8
Guru
 
No Mast's Avatar
 
City: Atlantic Highlands, NJ
Country: US
Vessel Name: Moana Huaka'i
Vessel Model: Selene 53
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by waddenkruiser View Post
Does anyone have any experience (good or bad ones) with automatic fire extinguishers mounted in the engine room?
We're on our third boat that has an automatic system installed. No experience using it, but I like having it.
No Mast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 07:08 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
City: Sausalito CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: GRACE
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 46 EU
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 139
Howard,
I store my spare fluids and parts in the compartment aft of the engine room bulkhead. Not sure if it's any safer, but keeps my engine room less cluttered....
__________________
Dawdler
Dawdler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 07:32 PM   #10
Guru
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,291
I do CGAUX boat safety checks and see all kinds of stuff in engine rooms some chock full. Aside from what you put there a more important point might be how you secure it. I would think oil that can spill would be both a safety and ecology issue so if its there please make sure its bomb proof fixed in position(not always the case). The same goes for tools and other things in the pit. Most people don't think about what would happen if their boat took a real significant roll. Sailors by far are less guilty of this fault do to the nature of how steep heel angles are part of the game.
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 07:39 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
City: Sausalito CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: GRACE
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 46 EU
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 139
Agreed--secure tie-down probably more important than location
__________________
Dawdler
Dawdler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 08:22 PM   #12
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
With our DeFever the ER storage is pretty good. so now we are hearing minimal ER size is less a fire hazard since less stuff we need can be stored there?
If this article forces a change of heart for you I will volunteer to relieve you of the guilt and swap you boats straight across
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2015, 10:55 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
BryanF's Avatar


 
City: Astoria
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Florence A
Vessel Model: 47' Sutton
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 173
It would seem to me that who ever wrote the article has never tried to burn engine oil. I tried building several versions of used oil heaters for my land based work shop. If the fire is hot enough to get the engine oil going you have way more problems than the few gallons of engine oil you carry on the boat. Rubber hoses and wire insulation catch fire at much lower temps than oil does.
Plastic tanks will long since be melted and the plastic will burn before the oil actually gets going. Fiberglass- well I never tried to burn any of that so I don't know.
BryanF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 12:35 AM   #14
Guru
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,291
Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanF View Post
It would seem to me that who ever wrote the article has never tried to burn engine oil. I tried building several versions of used oil heaters for my land based work shop. If the fire is hot enough to get the engine oil going you have way more problems than the few gallons of engine oil you carry on the boat. Rubber hoses and wire insulation catch fire at much lower temps than oil does.
Plastic tanks will long since be melted and the plastic will burn before the oil actually gets going. Fiberglass- well I never tried to burn any of that so I don't know.
If your boat burns and nobody is dead or injured you get the insurance money and some would see that as an up side. If five gallons of oil bust loose in your bilge gets pumped overboard and it comes to the attention of the marine police or CG you get to keep your boat and also get a whapping fine which your insurance may or may not pay you also have a really messy bilge and engine room.
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 12:41 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
waddenkruiser's Avatar
 
City: Southern Baltic
Country: Europe
Vessel Name: Sømarken
Vessel Model: AMS 40'
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
please make sure its bomb proof fixed in position
Agreed.

Automatic fire extinguisher: What kind of system do you have installed?
I'm thinking about an automatic CO2 extinguisher but I am not sure at which temperature threshold it should start to work. I have got an offer where it's already at 57 degrees C while our engine room temperature goes up to 45 degrees C under full load in hot weather.


best regards / med venlig hilsen
wadden
__________________
best regards / med venlig hilsen
Wadden
waddenkruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 08:19 AM   #16
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
If your boat burns and nobody is dead or injured you get the insurance money and some would see that as an up side. If five gallons of oil bust loose in your bilge gets pumped overboard and it comes to the attention of the marine police or CG you get to keep your boat and also get a whapping fine which your insurance may or may not pay you also have a really messy bilge and engine room.
depends on the spill....
you aren't automatically fined and your insurance will pay unless you were really negligent or careless.

Most cruisers carry oil and there is no "standard" of how to do it so they would be hard pressed to keep from paying.

I am not sure....but if such a big deal..... I would think ABYC would be all over it with retention areas, tied down specs, use of sensor bilge pump switches that refuse all but water...etc...

The good news is many boaters carry spare oil and you rarely see oil spills versus fuel spills.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 08:49 AM   #17
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,740
I did have a one gallon distilled water jug break last summer that was stored in my bilge. Popped a small hole in the bottom corner.
But I do and will continue to store spare oil, and my gallon for diesel for topping off the Racors if needed in the bilge.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 09:01 AM   #18
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by jleonard View Post
I did have a one gallon distilled water jug break last summer that was stored in my bilge. Popped a small hole in the bottom corner.
But I do and will continue to store spare oil, and my gallon for diesel for topping off the Racors if needed in the bilge.
I too have had water jugs crack, pinhole as the plastic seems way inferior to the Rotella jugs...but still they should be stored to minimize that risk such as in a Tupperware tub that also provides containment and stops movement or a milk carton with pads.

On my boat they are wedged between ribs below floor boards with absorbent pads under and blocking limber holes.

I go through them enough that wear or age pretty probably won't be a problem.

The reality is .....just about anyplace on a boat you have to take the same precautions.....secure storage and keeping it out of the water. I find the engine room the most convenient and before fire makes that oil a hazard....as I posted....the wood and fiberglass will be fully engulfed as will the engine and fuel ststem.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 10:35 AM   #19
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Country: pinellas
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,199
In addition to securing it remember that those oil jugs are very thin and easily punctured through vibration. I keep all mine in a plastic box with well secured lid with a boat diaper under them to cushion the bottom. If they leak the mess is contained in the box, hopefully.


Even more vulnerable are aluminum beer and soda cans.. but that it another story.
bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2015, 01:21 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
City: MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Blue Yonder
Vessel Model: 37
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by waddenkruiser View Post
Agreed.

Automatic fire extinguisher: What kind of system do you have installed?
I'm thinking about an automatic CO2 extinguisher but I am not sure at which temperature threshold it should start to work. I have got an offer where it's already at 57 degrees C while our engine room temperature goes up to 45 degrees C under full load in hot weather.


best regards / med venlig hilsen
wadden

I have a Fireboy/Xintex automatic system. It is not CO2. It is supposed to go off at 175F/79C. One thing you will have to have with an automatic system is an auto engine shutoff. This prevents the motor from sucking up all of the extinguisher agent.

Make sure you sign off the little inspection tag every six months. The Coast Guard told me that while I wasn't required to have the system, if I did, I was required to maintain the inspection log.
__________________

BlueYonder is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012