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Old 01-21-2016, 12:59 PM   #81
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I understand your comments.

Yes, I'm sure rings will make things more crowded in some places. On the other hand scaling those rock walls was downright dangerous. Many times over the years the only places available were in front of those walls without enough room to swing because of other boats nearby. It may be a toss up.
It's not just about adding rings but replacing the older ones which are becoming questionable with good ones that will be able to be used safely and confidently for the next bunch of years.

I often avoid places that have rings, period, for the crowding reason. Yet, in the off season places like Melanie, when one can swing safely, I will use. Middle of summer you won't find me in Desolation at all anymore.

The decisions and the courses of action are with the B.C. Council of Y.C. and Marine Parks Forever. Overall I think it will be good for boaters in general, just not for all of us, like most things.
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Old 01-21-2016, 01:04 PM   #82
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Don't know what size you are so maybe you can't answer.
Is Squitty Bay still too intimidating for most?
Haven't been in a long while.


I have not been to Squitty at all, barely to Lasqueti. My boat is 32' so I could go but we have headed to Desolation and then to the Broughtons or as close as we could get in the time available. We always preferred that area, Broughtons, to Desolation or Lasqueti.
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Old 01-21-2016, 01:32 PM   #83
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I have not been to Squitty at all, barely to Lasqueti. My boat is 32' so I could go but we have headed to Desolation and then to the Broughtons or as close as we could get in the time available. We always preferred that area, Broughtons, to Desolation or Lasqueti.

Hear ya.
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Old 01-21-2016, 01:53 PM   #84
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I don't know if I am in favour of putting rings into places like Melanie and Prideaux. Those anchorages are already so crowded that I won't go there except by dinghy, and putting rock rings in will only exascerbate that situation.
That's only half the issue, since the ones in the flyer had moorings and rock rings. How many of those are shallow enough to set an anchor? I've never been there so don't know.
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Old 01-21-2016, 03:43 PM   #85
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Don't know what size you are so maybe you can't answer. Is Squitty Bay still too intimidating for most?
Squitty itself hasn't changed. Rocks take a long time to change .

But in a thread on anchoring, in case there is some misunderstanding: Don't anchor in Squitty Bay. You can't do it and leave enough room for folks to turn around in there. Tie up (or more likely raft up) at the government dock.
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Old 01-21-2016, 06:54 PM   #86
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Last time we saw Squitty Bat we were bucking 5' seas in our Albin 25 and we still passed it up it was so full of sailboat masts. Found Boho Bay empty and anchored there.
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Old 01-21-2016, 10:03 PM   #87
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So look at like this, which I do. If the more popular places are packed in tighter, that leaves the "unpopular places" less crowded. I personally like less populated, less loud music from the rental crowd, less chance of fouling my main anchor, and piece and quiet to enjoy the morning coffee.
I find it extremely enjoyable to watch a Sea Otter crack open a clam or shellfish in the morning, a bald eagle swooping down for breakfast without the rental crowd partying down next to me.
Guess I'm an old fart, oh well....if need be ill just go farther north!
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Old 01-22-2016, 12:37 AM   #88
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...oh well....if need be ill just go farther north!
Don't bother - it sucks
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Old 01-22-2016, 09:52 AM   #89
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I'm not really happy until I get to Cape Caution. I like to explore the area just south as in Allison Harbour, Slingsby Channel, Treadwell Bay and Miles Inlet.

Same on a motorcycle. Trip to Montana dosn't start till I turned off I90 onto SR Montana 200.
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Old 01-22-2016, 10:10 AM   #90
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Stern anchor/shore Tie line

Kind of curious about the height of rings set in rock walls. Today's tidal range is 10'. Are they at MLLW? Plus 6'?


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Old 01-22-2016, 10:42 AM   #91
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The rings are usually hung on a chain to make them accessible throughout the tidal range.
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Old 01-22-2016, 11:14 AM   #92
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Buy a Waggoners book, all manners of shore ties covered in there. We have 600' of 1/2" floating line on an old cable reel. Such a pain to deal with so we pretty well know where to go to avoid the need for a shore tie. In rainy, cold and miserable weather lifting a hook is task enough.

When the wind is howling a shore tie will likely have your boat in the wrong position as opposed to a free swing. On several occasions we have been securely anchored in strong winds and had nearby shore tied vessels leave their shore tie and come swing with us.

When above Cape Caution unless you know the areas well a shore tie puts you nearer uncharted rocks (bears too) and stuff with no nearby help if you need it. In the social areas of Desolation Sound and lesser so the Broughtons there will always be someone there to assist you off a rock in the 18 foot tidal swings. Seen it happen, just last summer in fact in Skull Cove. Heard on the radio where the same had occurred in Grace Harbour.

Many will chime in and say they stern tie all the time. In quiet times and well charted waters yes they do. I may as well.

I agree with Ted on this one. The first year we had our boat, our attempts at a shore tie in font of an audience ended in failure and we left the anchorage with our tail between our legs and we've not tried one since. I'd never seen a boat blush before! Perhaps we will try again when alone in more ideal conditions. Subsequently, we've since gone all the way to Rupert and never felt the need to stern tie.


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Old 01-22-2016, 11:21 AM   #93
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I've never done it.

Out in front of Culpepper Lagoon I tried to hook up a stern anchor very close to shore as the drop-off was quite extreme. Too much weed so I couldn't set the hook so we just used or regular anchor and set it at about 100' deep. We did set our anchor alarm that night.
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Old 01-22-2016, 01:32 PM   #94
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The rings are usually hung on a chain to make them accessible throughout the tidal range.
Well that makes sense!


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Old 01-22-2016, 02:16 PM   #95
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There are places that are decent anchorages but you MUST shore tie if you want to stay in place, overnight or even for a few hours. The attraction may not be the anchorage itself but the surrounding area to visit, explore, fish, swim. The bottom may be steep and swinging will unhook you. It's the shore line that ensures you do not unhook. Of course weather dependent.

Our procedure is ours. We choose not to shore tie mostly now but we used to do a lot of it.
First anchor properly. I leave the engine in reverse so there is always pull on the rode. This limits the typical bounce back and the resulting wandering all over the place, especially out of range of the shore line reach. It also ensures that the main operator , me, is aboard in case something goes sideways like the anchor unhooking.

We carry 600' of 3/8 YELLOW line in three pieces. Each piece has a 12" eye braided in both ends. One eye has a carabiner braided in permanently. They are flaked and can quickly be undone and dropped on the back deck to be fed out readily as needed.

My wife gets in the dingbat. Clips the carabiner to one of several U bolts . As she rows to shore I feed line to her so she does not have to pull line. That is actually harder than it looks.

When she gets to shore our dingbat anchor , attached to a line which is also attached to the dinghy, can then be tossed ashore to hook on the beach/rocks so she can use it to pull herself up to the stepping out point. This way she does not have to find a place to also tie the dinghy.

She then pulls the shore line to the nearest securing point, wraps the line around and clips the carabiner to the standing part of the line. She's done other than returning. I can pull in excess and adjust the tension so the boat is not free to wander all over the place. I can now kill the engine.

Upon her return I take another piece of line back to shore as she feeds slack doing the reverse and connecting the two lines into each other. I can then fit in the strap to protect the tree. She then pulls up the excess on the second line.

Often getting the initial feed of line to the tree is easily done but the whole unravels when trying to pull the line back to the boat. The line no longer comes willingly from drag on the beach and/or tree. That's why we do it in two parts.

Its not foolproof of course but after a lot of trial and error and watching others we finally settled on this means.

A lot of people successfully use spools and a single length but I have not the space to easily store/mount that spool. The three flaked sections work and then if I don't need the 3rd piece it simply gets secured and put away.
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Old 01-22-2016, 03:19 PM   #96
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As of last summer (first time I've noticed them), Melanie Cove does have several rings with chains.
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Old 05-23-2016, 12:45 AM   #97
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Resurrecting old thread

Excuse my thread necromancy.

Looking to head North for the first time I am starting to plan for the potential stern tie. Lots of options, but amazingly my wife likes the Quickline Reel despite its cost. I have three concerns. The first is cost. I'm am a cheap SOB and it is simply expensive.

OK, the other two concerns are these. The first is what length of line would be needed. I hear lot of folks using 300', with some using 600' (likely 'cause that is what a full spool is). The large Quickline Reel will go to 377' of line. That isn't bad. However, to get that much on the reel they are using a lighter weight line with a breaking force of 2,750lbs. I don't have any experience, but that seems a bit light to me. They have a larger line to go on that same reel, but will only hold 265' of line but has a breaking strength of 4,400lbs.

Now, maybe I am worrying too much. 3/8" Sampson MFP Floatline which is what many use has a minimum breaking strength of 2,700lbs. The 1/2" MFP Floatline coincidentally has a minimum breaking strength of 4,400lbs.

So beyond my first concern which is cost, the convenience of the flat line and ease of storage seems pretty nice. What about length and strength?
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Old 05-23-2016, 01:06 AM   #98
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Typically you will stern tie in a protected moorage, the lines only job is to keep you from swinging. Your anchor provides the holding power.

Many use poly from stern to ring and back. Never have seen more than 150' to the ring.
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Old 05-23-2016, 01:28 AM   #99
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Typically you will stern tie in a protected moorage, the lines only job is to keep you from swinging. Your anchor provides the holding power.

Many use poly from stern to ring and back. Never have seen more than 150' to the ring.
Thanks Bob. So maybe the lighter line isn't a problem then. The extra length could be handy.
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Old 05-23-2016, 07:11 AM   #100
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Typically you will stern tie in a protected moorage, the lines only job is to keep you from swinging. Your anchor provides the holding power.
If the wind turns and comes from the side a tremendous strain can be placed on the stern line, no?

I will normally use two stern lines forming a "Y" together with the anchor rode to avoid excessive strain, except when anchored in a very narrow cove.
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