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Old 04-16-2016, 01:48 AM   #41
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My gaff rigged main sail is 200 square feet and the club footed self-tacking jib is another 100 square feet.
For a 13,000 pound motorsailer, the 300 square feet I have works well. (46 square feet/ton)

It is very effective for roll reduction with 10 knots of wind or more, at any angle except +/- 15 degrees on the nose.

For propulsion, it is effective at the same angles, giving me 2-3 knots of speed (or reducing my engine rpm significantly) in 10-15 knots of wind.

In 20 knots of wind, I can shut down the engine and sail at about 5 knots, or cruise at 7 knots with reduced rpm.


For roll reduction only, I'd say a steady sail would need to be at least 30 square feet per ton to be effective.

Retrofitting a mast, standing & running rigging and sails for the average trawler wouldn't be cheap. For most, it wouldn't make financial sense. The exception may be boats that have factory sailing versions available. (Gulfstar, Willard etc) It may make sense if the a full compliment of mast, boom, rigging, sails, can be purchaed cheap from old boat.
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Old 04-16-2016, 06:41 AM   #42
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The size of a sail is based on the height of the mast and length of the boom. There for our sail is 15 x 12 and its pulled tight and the boom is tied down so it does not swing, as its mostly used at anchor like a weather vane.
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Old 04-16-2016, 07:02 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
My gaff rigged main sail is 200 square feet and the club footed self-tacking jib is another 100 square feet.
For a 13,000 pound motorsailer, the 300 square feet I have works well. (46 square feet/ton)

It is very effective for roll reduction with 10 knots of wind or more, at any angle except +/- 15 degrees on the nose.

For propulsion, it is effective at the same angles, giving me 2-3 knots of speed (or reducing my engine rpm significantly) in 10-15 knots of wind.

In 20 knots of wind, I can shut down the engine and sail at about 5 knots, or cruise at 7 knots with reduced rpm.


For roll reduction only, I'd say a steady sail would need to be at least 30 square feet per ton to be effective.

Retrofitting a mast, standing & running rigging and sails for the average trawler wouldn't be cheap. For most, it wouldn't make financial sense. The exception may be boats that have factory sailing versions available. (Gulfstar, Willard etc) It may make sense if the a full compliment of mast, boom, rigging, sails, can be purchaed cheap from old boat.
Thank you for the inout...I am pretty sure you posted it before.

While 30 Sq ft per ton would certainly be very effective, it is out of the question for most production trawlers with existing masts and booms.

I am looking at maybe 60 Sq ft for my 10 ton trawler. Just wondering drink what others with similar sized sails see fo performance in 15 to 20 knot winds. Anything more is too rough and less is bearable without he sail.
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Old 06-21-2016, 07:53 PM   #44
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Dimensions of Staysail

Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Anyone using one care to give the dimensions please?
Hello Psneeld!

Here are the dimensions of my staysail. I am making a bigger one for light winds as I had an old genoa available.

Kindest regards, Normand
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Old 06-21-2016, 08:38 PM   #45
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Thank you!
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Old 06-21-2016, 09:41 PM   #46
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Cutting parts for seconde Staysail

I use the old staysail as a rough pattern in order to sow the pieces together. I use aluminium pop rivets where strenght is needed. Here are some pictures of the cut out from a genosa.
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Old 06-21-2016, 11:08 PM   #47
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Thank you KOliver and Ed,

I did want to throw it out there and the results seem predictable. In other words, if it was such a great idea everyone would be doing it and Paul Scott would not have to ask for the dimensions.

Also, a great point about the engine and mast. Both are doing well, why f.. them up. The mast and it's current 6 stays have done well in controlling the forces of the paravanes. The mast and salon roof show no signs of any stress.

So why add another force that could add some slight speed, at the expense of great risks and downsides.
As propulsion a Skysail (kind of kite) works, can save as much as 50% on fuel costs.

SkySails GmbHÂ*-Â*Home

http://newgentransp.e-monsite.com/pa...x-bateaux.html
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