Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-07-2018, 11:59 AM   #1
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Stabicraft? Anyone have one, or have experience with them?

I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with Stabicraft small boats? I'm exploring tenders, and definitely want at least an aluminum hull RIB, but am also considering all aluminum like the Stabicraft.


Any of our down-under friends use them?
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 12:03 PM   #2
TF Site Team
 
City: Westerly, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: N/A
Vessel Model: 1999 Mainship 350 Trawler
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,819
The smallest thing they make is an 18 foot walkaround-style boat. That won't fit on a dinghy dock. Do you plan on towing this?
__________________

Shrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 12:04 PM   #3
TF Site Team
 
City: Westerly, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: N/A
Vessel Model: 1999 Mainship 350 Trawler
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,819
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
The smallest thing they make is an 18 foot walkaround-style boat. That won't fit on a dinghy dock. Do you plan on towing this?
Nevermind. I followed your link. A 68 Nordhavn will have room.
Shrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 03:42 PM   #4
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
The smallest thing they make is an 18 foot walkaround-style boat. That won't fit on a dinghy dock. Do you plan on towing this?

They have a 16.5' open boat that could work. A guy I know with a Nordhavn 63 is recommending it, and it's definitely caught my attention. It's ugly as hell, but I might be able to get past that....
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 04:18 PM   #5
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,442
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with Stabicraft small boats? I'm exploring tenders, and definitely want at least an aluminum hull RIB, but am also considering all aluminum like the Stabicraft.


Any of our down-under friends use them?
The dealer was within a couple of miles of our house and I looked at them seriously. Seems like a fairly skookum design the me.
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 05:01 PM   #6
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
The dealer was within a couple of miles of our house and I looked at them seriously. Seems like a fairly skookum design the me.


Yes, and thatís what Iím looking for. A pickup truck of the sea.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 05:02 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Ka_sea_ta's Avatar
 
City: Puget Sound
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 441
I saw a Stabilcraft being towed a 65 ft+ boat in Garden Bay a couple of years ago.... what made this unique was there was a trailer ball on the swim platform and the stabilcraft had a towing bar very similar to what you see when an RV is towing a car... I dont understand how this arrangement prevented the tender from jackknifing when in reverse...
Ka_sea_ta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 05:10 PM   #8
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 2,188
What about a beamy tinny with a solid buoyancy foam collar?
At least your boat won't get dinged up.

https://boatcollar.com.au



We have the same tinny and haven't fitted a collar yet but its stable enough as it is to have both of us on one side at the same time.
This hull form (dory and busta) are used by a lot of commercial fisherman in these parts.
http://www.quintrex.com.au/Aluminium...Range/420Busta

Bigger 5.2m dory is 100kg lighter than a stabi and can carry more people.
http://www.quintrex.com.au/Aluminium...ars=520%20Dory
Simi 60 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 05:16 PM   #9
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 2,188
We do get a few stabicraft around here but due to price aren't popular at all.
Simi 60 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 05:54 PM   #10
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Thanks for all the tips.

BTW, Iím greatly relieved to see that they all include a chilly bin. :-)
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 06:15 PM   #11
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 9,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post

BTW, Iím greatly relieved to see that they all include a chilly bin. :-)
Are they made in New Zealand?
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 06:42 PM   #12
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,077
When we were living in Alaska a guy in Thorne Bay had one. Ugly thing. Don’t recall ever seeing it underway.
For an aluminum boat I had a 16’ Crestliner open skiff in Alaska. It was a big boat w lots of room. It performed very well w a 40hp E-tech. Carried loads well.
I really don’t see any good reason for the round sponson boats. No matter what material they are made with.
The “boat collar” won’t work as a fender w flared boat sides. Waves from the side could hold the boat down risking swamping. And there probably other things not obvious at a glance.
If one can handle lots of weight the Bull Frog is (I think) a good boat. Probably too heavy for some to most apps but 1/2 of the “sponson” is usable space inside the boat. That’s a big pluss. Too bad it’s so heavy. The way the Stabicraft is made I think they could easily build the same advantage into their boats.

But before I bought any of these sponson/tube type boats I’d be investigating if a regular monohull boat would be a better choice.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 07:05 PM   #13
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 2,188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
.
The “boat collar” won’t work as a fender w flared boat sides.
.
We had a boat with one tie up to us a few months back.
There was several inches of clearance between his metal and our timber.

Quote:
. Waves from the side could hold the boat down risking swamping. And there probably other things not obvious at a glance.
It provides additional buoyancy and if you look at the videos you will see small tinnys zooming up, down and across waves on river bars with no evidence of any swamping risk.
Quite the opposite in fact.

Simi 60 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 07:22 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
klee wyck's Avatar
 
City: Seattle and Blaine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Klee Wyck and Libra
Vessel Model: Lowland 48 and Noordzee Kotter 52
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
The smallest thing they make is an 18 foot walkaround-style boat. That won't fit on a dinghy dock. Do you plan on towing this?
Above not true.
I have spent some time studying this boat and looking at them at a dealer in Everett, WA. It would likely be my choice in new tender for a decent sized boat.
They make a 1410 in open and fisher models as well as a 1550 in the fisher line. These boats are just over 14' and 15' respectively.

Well built in my view and expect they would be stable in the water though I have not driven one. Probably meet the 'tank' classification compared to most tenders. Probably not a real dry ride in a cross wind compared to the shape of a Lund or my Klamath, for example.

I would love to own one and encourage you to give it a serious look. Very rare used here though I passed on one last year I kick myself over.
__________________
Bill
klee wyck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 07:46 PM   #15
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Are they made in New Zealand?

Gee, why do you ask :-)
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 07:49 PM   #16
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Quote:
Originally Posted by klee wyck View Post
Above not true.
I have spent some time studying this boat and looking at them at a dealer in Everett, WA. It would likely be my choice in new tender for a decent sized boat.
They make a 1410 in open and fisher models as well as a 1550 in the fisher line. These boats are just over 14' and 15' respectively.

Well built in my view and expect they would be stable in the water though I have not driven one. Probably meet the 'tank' classifica
tion compared to most tenders. Probably not a real dry ride in a cross wind compared to the shape of a Lund or my Klamath, for example.

I would love to own one and encourage you to give it a serious look. Very rare used here though I passed on one last year I kick myself over.



The guy I know who has one says it's a very dry ride.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2018, 03:54 PM   #17
Guru
 
JDCAVE's Avatar
 
City: Lions Bay, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Phoenix Hunter
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 (1985)
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 2,226
TT: I saw one or two of them around last summer. One was tricked out as a sport fishing boat. They look excellent, however you might be able to get an outfit to custom build one for you in the US and that might be ultimately more affordable.

One suggestion is to consider ďstrakesĒ along the hull surfaces towards the bow. Evidently they make a big difference towards reducing spray/splash when crashing into waves. My good friend in Prince Rupert has a sport fishing vessel with strakes and swears by them. He never takes spray over the bow.

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2054.jpg
Views:	51
Size:	170.1 KB
ID:	83332

Iím the fetching looking fellow with the yellow pants.
JDCAVE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2018, 04:16 PM   #18
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,936
Thanks Jim. Supposedly the stabicraft hull design is very dry, but I have no 1st hand experience. However in some of the videos of them underway, it looks like the upper part of the hull hangs out over the lower part serving as a splash guard. Maybe?
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2018, 04:48 PM   #19
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 2,188
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDCAVE View Post
TT: I saw one or two of them around last summer. One was tricked out as a sport fishing boat. They look excellent, however you might be able to get an outfit to custom build one for you in the US and that might be ultimately more affordable.

One suggestion is to consider ďstrakesĒ along the hull surfaces towards the bow. Evidently they make a big difference towards reducing spray/splash when crashing into waves. My good friend in Prince Rupert has a sport fishing vessel with strakes and swears by them. He never takes spray over the bow.

Attachment 83332

Iím the fetching looking fellow with the yellow pants.
That quintrex dinghy of ours that I posted above has what they call a millennium hull
We have punched back to the big boat for several miles in 25knots with some decent slop and had a dry ride and surprisingly going faster gave a better ride.
Having had both hull shapes I was amazed at the difference, the older hull was bone jarring and wet vs a lot smoother and dry


Simi 60 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2018, 05:16 PM   #20
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,077
V hulls w concave bottoms is from the past. Was very popular when boats were planked. Almost forgotten when most boats became plywood.
The concave bottoms pound in the vicinity of the chine and only improve the ride in a light chop. Modern boats now seem to favor neither concave or convex chines. And in FG it’s as easy to make either one.

I’d guess the concave bottom pounds more in banked turns but tracks better otherwise. As for spray deflection either or all bottoms can make use of the spray/lift rails.

Actually the dryest ride, I think comes from a rather sharp rounded chine at the turn of the bilge w an out turn just above. The rounded part slows down the beamwise flow of water, pulls it up w enough force to turn it basically 90 degrees away from the hull. Early Uniflite boats had such a chine. Not as efficient as a hard and sharp chine. Just my opinion.

Simi,
The vidio in 13 looks like fun.
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×