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Old 12-28-2010, 02:17 PM   #21
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RE: spar varnish or Epifanes

What is C.P.E.S.?? *'Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer' I presume. *Is it a product? *I don't see such stuff in the Wost Catalog. * Or I have heard somewhere of reducing clear epoxy resin with a solvent ( lacquer?) to aid penetration followed by an undiluted coat of resin. *I think I would apply the second coat before the first cures out to avoid a blush problem. *Do I got the idea? *I am seriously close to buying a trawler with teak trim (no decks!) So, I am going to have to learn. *I have a teak cockpit floor in the current Trojan cruiser, and it is a pain in the A**. * I have used Semco teak sealer, it keeps it color but looks like Hell. *I have used semi transparent deck and siding sealer with equal results and cheaper. *But it looks crappy too. *Time to learn the right way.*<table style="font-size:11px;color:#000000;" class="genmed" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td style="font-family:Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;" width="40"></td></tr></tbody></table>
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Old 12-28-2010, 02:37 PM   #22
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RE: spar varnish or Epifanes

You could get an interesting effect by diluting the epoxy with acitone.
It would take a long time to harden.*

It sure helps when bonding resin to plywood.

Sets up a tac coat. Something for the resin and glass to bond with.

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Old 12-28-2010, 03:26 PM   #23
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spar varnish or Epifanes

Quote:
Capn Craig wrote:

What is C.P.E.S.?? *'Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer' I presume. *Is it a product? *I don't see such stuff in the Wost Catalog. * Or I have heard somewhere of reducing clear epoxy resin with a solvent ( lacquer?) to aid penetration followed by an undiluted coat of resin. *I think I would apply the second coat before the first cures out to avoid a blush problem. *Do I got the idea? *I am seriously close to buying a trawler with teak trim (no decks!) So, I am going to have to learn. *I have a teak cockpit floor in the current Trojan cruiser, and it is a pain in the A**. * I have used Semco teak sealer, it keeps it color but looks like Hell. *I have used semi transparent deck and siding sealer with equal results and cheaper. *But it looks crappy too. *Time to learn the right way.
<table style="font-size:11px;color:#000000;" class="genmed" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td style="font-family:Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;" width="40"></td></tr></tbody></table>

*
CPES is a brand product.* It is sold by Rot Doctor in Seattle-- it can be ordered from his website or if you live in the area as we do you can drive to his house and buy it there.* CPES is actually manufactured by Smith & Company, who also has a website from which it can be purchased.* CPES is carried by at least one marine store we use, Fisheries Supply in Seattle and I assume it is in their on-line catalog.

I would not expect to find CPES at West Marine as that store increasingly sells store-branded products and does not cater to the "serious" boater or shipwright as do stores like Fisheries, LFS, etc.

The absolute worst thing you can do to a teak deck is do anything to it.* Teak cleaners and restorers do exactly the same thing as sandpaper only they do it chemically.* People who want "teak colored" decks should never buy a boat with teak decks.* Teak goes silver-gray because of the natural weathering of the upper layer of wood cells.* There is no way to make these cells turn brown again other than by staining them which tends to reduce the value of having a teak deck in the first place which is superior traction, wet or dry.

The only other way to make a teak deck brown again is to remove the upper layers of gray wood cells.* You can do this mechanically (sandpaper, scrub pads) or you can do it chemically (teak cleaners/restorers).

In both cases, wood goes away and the day the deck will have to be replaced comes that much closer.

Example--- a 120' corporate yacht I was associated with in the course of a book project was built in 1966 with teak decks.* The use of the yacht dictated that the decks look like new wood at all times.* So the crew treated them with teak cleaner/restorer on a regular schedule.* The decks were stunning but as a result, they had to be replaced every so many years because the teak cleaner would remove wood to the point that the planking became too thin to be serviceable, at which point it was replaced.* Major, major cost to people like me, but it was simply factored into the operating budget for the yacht.

There is only one truly proper way to care for a teak deck while maximizing its longevity and that is to simply wash it periodically with salt water and a detergent like Lemon Joy.* Lemon Joy is popular because it makes good suds in cold water.* Then rinse the deck off with clean salt water.* That's it.*

Anything else you do to a teak deck--- Cetol, oil, teak cleaners, wood preservative, Thompson's Water Seal, Semco, and all the other "wonder" treatments and coatings either hasten the day the deck will reach the point where it's too thin to work with anymore OR will eventually fail in the weather (Cetol is a prime example of this) and look hideous and have to be removed at great expense and with the loss of wood.* Plus many of these treatments weaken or destroy the adhesion of the deck seams to the sides of the grooves which then allows moisture to get under the teak planks from where it can migrate down into the subdeck wood and eventually cause major problems.*

This, by the way, is why you should always wash a teak deck with salt water.* If some does get down under the planks, salt water is less condusive to the formation of wood rot that fresh water.

Bottom line is--- if you buy* a boat with teak decks, you had better learn to like silver-gray.* The only way to maintain a degree of brown color in the deck planks without removing wood periodically or threatening the integrity of the deck seams is to keep the boat under cover out of the weather and UV light.

I've read that teak decks can be a major problem in some parts of the northeastern US.* The reason is acid rain.* Acid rain apparently turns teak black, not silver-gray.* I don't know if pollution controls over the past few decades have reduced or elminated this problem, but I have read in wood-care articles in years past that if you had a boat with teak decks in parts of the northeast you did everything you could to keep it in a boathouse or at least keep rain off the deck.




-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 28th of December 2010 04:40:27 PM
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