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Old 07-05-2015, 12:01 PM   #21
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Hiding under the chair dosn't become you Don so come on out and defend your friend.
OK Eric, I'm out. You guys catch me if you can.
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Old 07-05-2015, 12:09 PM   #22
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"A true trawler is built to take bad weather and rough seas,, gotta be, they cant outrun it."

The 15-50K boat therefore has to plan ALL its cruises with a weather eye and the safe hole locations well planned in advance.

Because the risk of NOT being quick enough to go hide could be the loss of the vessel?

I guess that's what all the fancy electronic toys are for and why so many stay dockside ?
A prudent captain always keeps track of the weather, and plans for safe locations...regardless of the style of boat.

I will admit that there are more capable heavy weather boats than my SD design. I will also admit (happpily) that there are more capable heavy weather captains than I.

But I will submit FF that when the weather gets rough, the heavy weather boats, along with their capable captains are sitting right next to me at the dock my friend....

Thats because heavy weather is NO FUN in ANY BOAT.

I would much prefer to be sitting at the dock relaxing then getting my ass kicked by mother nature.
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Old 07-05-2015, 12:31 PM   #23
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This is the 47' Concorde I moved to Detroit last year, draft 5.5' beam 16' and powered by twin 350 hp 8v71 DD. Going down Lake Huron the forecast was 2' to 3' the reality was at least twice that, we were dipping the pulpit occasionally. No problem with the boat taking it, but after about 8 hours it was very uncomfortable always holding on to be able to keep your feet under you. After that trip I agree with Ksanders I would want the hp to outrun that type of condition if possible. When we came thru the mackinaw straights and headed south we didn't have that option with 20 - 25 kts wind out of the south, we were taking the waves on our port bow. I changed our destination for the day to a closer protected anchorage. And we lost 2 more days of travel on Lake Huron because of similar or worse conditions with gust up to 35 kts. I pretty sure a true FD trawler would not of been anymore comfortable and our boats can really take adverse conditions much worse than the majority of us and our crews, some may enjoy "The Perfect Storm" type of boating but not me and certainly not after the 1st couple of hours.


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Old 07-05-2015, 12:37 PM   #24
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And so it goes .... on and on as before.

Oliver,
Willy is actually not underpowered. She can do all that her hull will allow.

And Kevin you're right .. the big engines delivered the winning card .. that day.

Ok, Eric.
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Old 07-05-2015, 01:32 PM   #25
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The BIG difference in this discussion is not the "dont go" factor, but the "when caught" factor. I've been caught a few times. My 31 foot Ameracat can handle a lot, I have to slow down to 25 knots in close 4 footers. It does 3 footers, if they're close together, at 40 knots. I dont generally go out in stuff like that unless I have paying customers that say "lets go, we can take it". Funny thing is, usually they can !! My 48 sporty does pretty good in 4 to 5s unless they're on the beam. If I have a good deckhand my customers can fish all day. I work all day driving the boat. Not so much fun. My 51 Krogen trawler (paravanes handles it all easily. I've been caught out in it a few times and while not fun to do, if you point the bow into it and hold position it takes 10 to 15s pretty good. Even with a short period blowing into the Mississippi sound behind a big storm. That time faster would not have helped. A dockmaster at Gulfport that could read a chart would have.
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Old 07-05-2015, 01:34 PM   #26
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It is interesting that on a TRAWLER FORUM, so much time and bandwidth is spent extolling the virtues of boats other than trawlers.
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Old 07-05-2015, 01:43 PM   #27
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It is interesting that on a TRAWLER FORUM, so much time and bandwidth is spent extolling the virtues of boats other than trawlers.
Yup. Isn't it nice that so many "birds of different feathers" can come together and have friendly discussions about a wide variety of topics, and be kind to each other whilst doing it. Just think how boring TF would be if we only owned one type of boat.

Ain't life just grand!
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Old 07-05-2015, 02:27 PM   #28
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GFC, you are correct, it is. It would be like that "other" forum
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Old 07-05-2015, 02:33 PM   #29
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I'm a slow kind of guy most of the time but last week I was on a 46 Post from Stuart to St. Augustine. 10 hours at 20 plus knots burning 31 GPH. It would have taken Hobo almost 30 hours to cover that distance. I was glad I wasn't paying the fuel bill.
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Old 07-05-2015, 02:45 PM   #30
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But the guy who was paying the fuel bill didn't mind. It's all relative to what's important to you. For us, we don't even figure fuel cost into the ownershp costs of our boats. It's something we have to pay and if we were worried about it then we shouldn't be boating. So however much fuel our boats burn is what they burn and it's irrelevant to what we want out of boating. Unless a boat runs out of fuel, at which point fuel becomes very relevant.
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Old 07-05-2015, 03:25 PM   #31
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Unless a boat runs out of fuel, at which point fuel becomes very relevant.
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Old 07-05-2015, 03:35 PM   #32
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What this thread actually is, I'm afraid is mostly an extension of the "what is a trawler" thread. Many posts there but the real definition lies more in the posts on this thread. If your boat is not capable of gracefully doing more than 6.5 to 10 knots (depending on length) then you don't have a trawler. This question has been flopping about never really being answered. I've always tried to tie weight to the nose on the donkey but perhaps speed is actually a better yardstick. Of course limited speeds are just the result of weight's effect on speed but the results are that speed is a bit more tangible to most. Very few would argue that if a boat can sustain more than a knot or two above hull speed that it's not a trawler.

So Keith w his large, stiff, shallow, high powered boat capable of 15 knots dosn't have a trawler but obviously he does a lot of trawlering at sub-displacement speeds and clearly is "one of us". When Art came on the form asking if his boat was a trawler he clearly wanted to be a member of the club and nobody flopped the truth out so he could choke on it (like we should have) but kicked the can around the forum for a long time avoiding offending him and telling him the truth. He got it but there was nothing left of the can by that time and many more were on the forum as member of the clan and henceforth all have been welcome here. The only reminisce of the issue is that many w very fast boats w/o a hint of trawler in them have come out of the closet very slowly. GFC may be an example of that. His username was very common (to me) but I couldn't remember seeing his boat before. I've always liked him and now I like his boat too but there isn't a trawler bone in her that I can see.

It all makes little difference or none at all but as to defining a trawler having a clear look at one one end of the stick renders a great deal of clarity to the other end. So boats that can't go fast are most likely trawlers and those that can aren't. It's a choice. We all are free to buy whatever type. Going fast is fun and most would like to do it but seaworthyness, range, fuel economy, comfort and a number of other things must be sacrificed to some large (and small) degree to attain the speed desired. There's no right and wrong at all. Just a style that fits our needs and/or wants and of course that's directly connected to the ability to pay.

So w this thread I think there is a more clear notion of what a trawler is and it's essence is illuminated most clearly by it's speed ... or lack of speed. And I hope that those w/o trawlers stay or come forth from the sidelines and mingle w us that do. The record here will show that you will be welcome and your opinions embraced equally w all the rest. But I say this and express my opinion having no power to make it so.
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Old 07-05-2015, 04:45 PM   #33
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Methinks there is a middle kingdom for coastal cruising, wherein you have a boat that you can force up to about 10-12 knots so that you don't have to wait for tide changes, or be endangered by currents with no options. For me a single engine over 220 HP does this for boats up to 40', especially if the boat is already on the cruising grounds.

The secret sauce for any finely fitted yacht, that instantly makes it the fastest of any, is a remote autopilot. You can fish, let your guest come down off the bridge after a few hours, and escape the tyranny of the wheel.

Read a magazine, and you're in Baltimore, if the water's flat. Mind you, autopilots on go-fast boats can end badly...
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Old 07-05-2015, 05:15 PM   #34
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We usually run fast between destinations. Then slow down for a few days to savor the area.



Then slow down to near trawler speeds for sometimes a couple of weeks at a time. We love towing the dinghy, anchoring, and exploring.

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Old 07-05-2015, 05:53 PM   #35
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Same with us. we cruise slower more often than fast. Cummins mechanic criticized me because my turbo wasn't discolored enough, said I babied the motor too much.

I don't have a trawler, but the subject matter is more often common to all boats rather than trawlers only. I guess I can go over to the Sea Ray forum and discuss underwater lights, or go over to the downeast forum and be evicted because my boat is not a real downeaster.
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Old 07-05-2015, 06:17 PM   #36
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Don't go yonder Yonder!

Trawlers may not even be the majority's here. And most of the stuff we discuss is common to all except sailboaters and even them to a marked degree. I think it just means trawlering and trawlers is where we lean. We,ve all got seawater pumps. Batts, exhaust elbows, fuel usage ect ect. Oh I forgot anchors. What I'm hoping for is a flat line of respect for powerboats cruising slowly most or all the time.

OK jones .... now you're into naming non-trawlers that cruise. Coastal cruisers implies long distance cruising IMO. One could require a different kind of boat for day or local cruising. There's three different types of cruising boats. And after local cruising there's day boats where one seldom overnights .. or boats w no overnight accommodations. There's a pie slice for everybody. One could start w passagemakers and go through all the cruisers and end up at the day boats. Gasoline and OB boats would slide in there somewhere. Forget about water skiers. Many of these distinctions will be harder to call than coastal cruisers and trawlers. Wanna have a go at it?
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Old 07-05-2015, 06:43 PM   #37
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Same with us. we cruise slower more often than fast. Cummins mechanic criticized me because my turbo wasn't discolored enough, said I babied the motor too much.

I don't have a trawler, but the subject matter is more often common to all boats rather than trawlers only. I guess I can go over to the Sea Ray forum and discuss underwater lights, or go over to the downeast forum and be evicted because my boat is not a real downeaster.
I think the Back Cove 37 is one of the best blends of boats. With the big single Cummins it has the choice of a good turn of speed. With thrusters and electronic controls handling around the dock is easy. That plus the fact that it is a dang fine looking boat. Much bang for the buck. It's Downeast enough for me.
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Old 07-05-2015, 07:08 PM   #38
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A prudent captain always keeps track of the weather, and plans for safe locations...regardless of the style of boat.
That's the gold star statement in this whole thread

My wife and I sea kayaked from Kitimat on BC's north coast to Bella Bella on BC's central coast, starting in late October and finishing up in late December a number of years ago. There were many times we had to stay put for storms, and once had to wait out a hurricane force storm for 5 days as it built up then faded away.

Before long crossings or 10 mile stretches of rock walls, with only 8 hours of winter daylight, we had to choose wisely.

Me-thinks ones window of concern, weather-wise, expands greatly as the speed of ones vessel diminishes. Therefore, I have a hunch that faster boats may get "caught" more often than slower vessels.
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Old 07-05-2015, 08:43 PM   #39
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Especially if 3rd parties are in the parties.
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Old 07-05-2015, 10:22 PM   #40
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In a comfortable, fully self-contained Tollycraft tri cabin that is built tough and designed to be good at taking moderate to fairly rough seas… I simply hate being able to cruise 5.5 to 6 knots running only one of the twins at near 3 nmpg... or do 7 to 7.5 knots on twins at 2+/- nmpg… or plane at 16 to 17 knots on both engines for 1 nmpg... or top out at 21 to 22 knots at who-gives-a-shat nmpg - if need be, for any reason.

BTW – Hard chines for limited-roll and only 2’10” draft for gunk holing really bugs me too!

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