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Old 01-28-2014, 06:33 PM   #21
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Wonder what type of anchor it was?
Eric?
Seemed to have high holding power.
Looked similar to a Navy stockless like so many large vessels have but I didn't look that close...it didn't actually have to grab well...just a little and there was probably enough to pivot the ship on...

Most large ships anchors really aren't made for high holding power as they would rather be underway in the bad stuff....
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Old 01-28-2014, 06:49 PM   #22
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I've seen a couple of other versions of this procedure in this harbour. They do this all the time here. There's one of them in heavier sea's out there as well. It doesn't have the other freighters in the harbour if I recall correctly.

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Old 01-28-2014, 07:22 PM   #23
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I guess if you do it regularly, there's nothing to it. It all about experience and procedures.

I learned to fly in Chicago, the Windy City. High winds and crosswinds were just part of everyday flying there. I didn't think much of it since it was all I knew and I was taught how to fly in high winds safely from day 1.

When I worked as a flight instructor in AZ, most instructors stayed on the ground with 30-40 knot crosswinds. I encouraged my students to come out and challenge themselves for an hour of dual instruction to learn how to do it right. We had the airport traffic pattern to ourselves for hours at a time.

(I notice that there were no others out there playing in the waves...all were secured to their docks.)
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:40 PM   #24
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I guess if you do it regularly, there's nothing to it. It all about experience and procedures.

I learned to fly in Chicago, the Windy City. High winds and crosswinds were just part of everyday flying there. I didn't think much of it since it was all I knew and I was taught how to fly in high winds safely from day 1.

When I worked as a flight instructor in AZ, most instructors stayed on the ground with 30-40 knot crosswinds. I encouraged my students to come out and challenge themselves for an hour of dual instruction to learn how to do it right. We had the airport traffic pattern to ourselves for hours at a time.

(I notice that there were no others out there playing in the waves...all were secured to their docks.)
When I can make a posting from my laptop again, this weekend, I'll do a posting about exactly that, by never challenging ourselves, there is really no learning.

Details to follow. Also a few exciting stories, but sorry, not as exciting as the Greeks.
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Old 01-29-2014, 05:23 AM   #25
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I'm not looking forward to my first Mediterranean-style docking.
Practice practice practice ...

At your own or an empty slip just practice backing in and using a pair of crossed stern lines. Succeed and repeat.

When you are comfortable backing in, drop the hook about a boat length out from where the bow will sit when docked. Practice practice practice.

Thousands of boats do it all over the world everyday, hundreds do it here in FLL.

Practice when conditions are perfect and traffic is non existent, who cares if it doesn't go right the first few dozen tries? It's a hobby.
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Old 01-29-2014, 12:10 PM   #26
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Article in this month's Professional Mariner about the SS Badger, a 411 foot coal fired ferry on Lake Michigan running between Ludington Mich., and Manitowoc, Wis. Built in 1953, and weighing 4,244 gross tons, the skipper drops his anchor and uses it as a spring line to dock the ship and both ends of his four hour run. Now that would be something to watch.
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:11 PM   #27
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From watching I can see exactly why the captain in those conditions did what he did. That said: Boy Oh Boy... am I ever glad that was not my responsibility. Can we spell "crunch" That type of big boat maneuvering in those close quarters is beyond my seamanship pay grade! I'm fairly good at figuring things out - but, not that good! - LOL
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