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Old 11-22-2011, 04:20 PM   #21
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

Yes, the tug was sold this summer but I still like it as an avitar.
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Old 11-22-2011, 04:43 PM   #22
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

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Doc wrote:

The decision...another boat or an RV... is tough.
********* Doc, Nothing wrong with land cruising in an RV, but it would seem to me it is probably pretty easy just to rent them by the week, where you want it and leave the whole owner ship thing to someone else.

********* I get around to a lot of "gated communities" and by every clubhouse there are a bunch of stored motorhomes,* just like boats, lots of good intentions and tons of excuses not to leave the dock.

********* I would of thought your NT42 would have been great for the Loop.Would you go bigger or smaller if you decide to "boat up" again?

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Old 11-22-2011, 06:30 PM   #23
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

Doc;

We have the same issue, as my first mate retired a few yrs ago, and I joined her in retirement this year. We struggled with what to do in our retirement for a nanosecond or so, and here is what we have come up with.
Keep the boat. No matter what else we want to do, it will never trump cruising the BC coast in the summers. She wanted to buy a winter home in the sun and snowbird. I, OTOH, am leery about Real Estate in the US right now, and I haven't seen much of the states, so an RV was attractive. We looked at various sizes and shapes of motorhomes for the last few years, and every cheap one we toured pretty much soured our expectations. Last March, we vacationed in a house in Indio Calif, and since I don't golf, I looked at all the motorhomes I could in the first 2 weeks. My take on them is that you only get what you pay for, like boats, so unless you are happy with a terrible ride and crappy looking inside finishes, start looking in the highest price you can afford. The better ones (I equate better with bigger after looking at so many) all have diesels, and once they have a diesel, they don't get blown about by big trucks, so the tag axle is a non issue. The big ones need a tag axle to carry the big weight anyway. We found the RV market quite depressed, so were able to get what was at the time a steal of a deal on a 13 yr old Diesel, high end Motorhome. Of course, having spent our money, the prices are even lower 6 months later.
The toughest part to predict is the quality of the places you will end up in. So far, for us, the places are generally a disappointment. You really need to book ahead, and to get a better rate, a longer booking, like a week or a month will significantly cut the rate. Anchoring out is rarely an option, unless you are just travelling and spending long days on the road. A crappy marina is far better than a crappy RV site, as at least you have a great view.
We have just returned home after spending a month in California, in a higher end place, and all was good, except the total lack of social contact. That surprised me, as when we go boating, there are always friendly people at whatever place we end up in, but in the RV site we were in, most of the people there were owners, who kept to themselves or their pre-established social routines, to which we were never invited.
RVing is quite a bit cheaper than boating, in capital cost and in annual cost, except for depreciation, which is huge, no matter the age of the unit. I figure my boat has retained most of its initial cost in present value, all I have lost there is the inflation on the money, but the RV, because there are so many of them, has a steep depreciation, exascerbated in a tough economy.
A few years of this split personality before we have to pick one. I expect when the time to choose comes, the boat will win.
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Old 11-22-2011, 06:45 PM   #24
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Sold Boat, Bought RV?

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I expect when the time to choose comes, the boat will win.
The main, number one reason neither my wife nor I have any interest whatsoever in RVing is that there is virtually no challenge.* Or perhaps*I should say no challenge we think is*worth tackling.* Traffic is a challenge, boring RV parks would be a challenge to put up with, and the other negatives that Keith outlines in his post.* There is no skill required in RVing*unless one considers*being able to maneuver the thing onto a pad, hook up the pumpout hose, and operate the leveling mechanism to be skills.

But nothing like the currents, winds,*tides, anchoring, navigation, weather, maneuvering,*docking,*and all the other really satisfying challenges to deal with that you get with a boat.

Yes, there are lots of pretty, interesting, or historical places one can go in an RV.* Or you can fly there, rent a car, and see, experience, and learn exactly the same things and skip the hours of droning down the highway in the middle of everybody else who's droning down the highway.

I'm glad there are lots of people who enjoy RVing because that means they aren't out cluttering up the anchorages and bays in boats.* But*we could not abide a pasttime that has no challenge.* And no, I do not consider being able to get a good lock with the satellite dish in under 30 seconds*to be a true challenge.

*


-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 22nd of November 2011 07:48:28 PM
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:01 PM   #25
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

Marin:

There are challenges; how to maintain and/or improve the RV so as to recover as much as possible when it is sold; Finding a spot that has a view, privacy, quiet, activities, good weather; keeping the costs of the previous items under control;

But you are right about the nautical challenges. None of those exist inland. Nor are there prawns, oysters, crabs.

Its just different, and our plans for RV usage don't infringe on boating time in the summers, only on those times we weren't out on the water.

No more being stuck inside the boat because it is too cold/miserable to go outside (unless this happens in the summer. but last summer, we successfully followed the 7 day forecast and had only a couple of day bad weather in over two months on the boat.)
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:24 PM   #26
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Sold Boat, Bought RV?

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No more being stuck inside the boat because it is too cold/miserable to go outside
*But I would WAY rather be stuck inside a boat in lousy weather than stuck inside an RV in lousy weather.* To just sit there looking at four cheap walls and the RV next door out the window would be absolute*hell on wheels, I think. :-)

And the marine environment, even on a mooring in a protected bay on a calm day, is always changing.* An RV park pretty much stays the way it is other than the other RVs coming and going.

Nope, I* just can't see it.**More power to the people who do.* They*must get something satisfactory out of RVing or they wouldn't*keep doing it.**But it baffles me as to what that something must be.

By the way, I draw a very distinct line between a road trip and RVing.* Two years ago we drove a good 2,000 miles between southwestern Virginia/North Carolina and Prince Edward Island in Canada and back.* Flew Seattle to Washington, DC and rented a car.* We*thoroughly*enjoyed the trip othe than the run from Maine back to southern Virginia,*non-stop for eighteen hours.* But the very thought of spending even one night in an*RV park is scary to us.


-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 22nd of November 2011 08:25:44 PM
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:50 PM   #27
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

I'm one of those lucky guys who has both a boat and a RV and my take is you should never let snow fall on your RV. As Marin said that he would rather be in a boat than a RV in lousy weather. Well, the trick is don't park the RV where the weather is lousy. Oh sorry, I forgot that Marin is still working and paying for my retirement. Thanks Marin.

You are right however about the fact that boating is far more fun than RVing in my opinion. I find it mind numbing boring driving down the I-5 from the PNW to Yuma but it only takes 4 days to make the trip amd my wife prefers to do most of the driving. If I could have only one, it would be the boat.

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Old 11-22-2011, 07:55 PM   #28
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I forgot that Marin is still working and paying for my retirement. Thanks Marin.

*I'm paying for mine. You're on your own.

*

"I find it mind numbing boring driving down the I-5 from the PNW to Yuma..."

And that's another thing that totally baffles me.* I've been to Arizona and New Mexico.* I could see being sent to prison there because being in prison isn't supposed to be nice.* But when you combine the boredom of RV parks with the boredom of being in the hot, dry, bleak, blasted*environment of the southwest the whole thing reminds me of those people in the Philipines who drag crosses around with the hooks dug into their skin while they whip themselves with a cat-o-nine tails.* Why do that to yourself?

Maybe it's because I grew up in Hawaii so have had more than my fill of the sun and never-changing weather.* There are neat things to see in the southwest, no question,*but my approach would be to fly there, see them, and get the hell out.* I just don't get the whole snowbird thing at all.

On other hand, anything that takes people out of here and puts them somewhere else is a Good Thing in my book.* So I guess I should be encouraging the snowbirds to make the move permanent instead of trying to figure out why, like lemmings, they do it. :-)


-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 22nd of November 2011 10:45:56 PM
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:08 PM   #29
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

Each form of travel has its charm. Its pretty hard to see Mt. Rushmore or Crazy Horse in a boat. There's a spot in the Provincial Park at Missinippi on the Churchill River where you can have fresh water out each side of the RV but you have to be the first there to get it and if you get the right spot at Castle Mountain its great even in the rain, BTDT. Kaslo is on the water but not real accessible in our trawler and Sandon is flat out of the question. We spent many wonderful summers ripping up the Shuswap River with our ski boat while camped nearby. Both of us are still working - the RV allows us to be in a variety of places where people actually pay us to see the country while we put money in the boat fuel fund - can't beat that. The boat is a destination and an activity in and of itself - the RV is a base to do things from while you come home to your own bed every night.
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:17 PM   #30
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

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*the RV is a base to do things from while you come home to your own bed every night.
That concept is something we do, but not with an RV.** We base in one spot and take one or two (or more) day trips out from there with a rental car.* In England they're called self-catering cottages, in France they're called gites (soft "g").* We've stayed in some really neat places, like working sheep farms in the Yorkshire Dales and medieval hill towns in France.* I suppose you could do the same thing in the US although I suspect it's not nearly as commonplace as it is in Europe.* But it's a great concept plus*you don't have to screw with feeding and maintaining an RV and*the*rental car's not our problem if it quits.* (First rule in the film industry-- trash the rental.)
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Old 11-23-2011, 04:43 AM   #31
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

IN the US we simply use the coach to go sight seeing, at 35 ft it goes where the UPS truck will fit , and that's about everywhere.

For visiting a large city like Montreal , we do tow a CRV. as downtown parking costs more .
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Old 11-24-2011, 03:47 AM   #32
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

"To just sit there looking at four cheap walls "


Maybe in the typical "Sticks and Staples the walls were done by some "decorator' ,

but in a bus conversion its more "form follows function" and big windows for loads of light.

A really great winter snow storm on a boat ,,40-50K and horizontal snow / sleet IS an adventure.

The same conditions in an RV is time for a book or a movie.

Tho my bride works away on the spinning wheel and listens to book.
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Old 11-24-2011, 06:58 AM   #33
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

I took my wife to look at her first RV yesterday. She, the wise woman, said that smaller was better. In her opinion the 24' Class C Coachman Prisim with a Mercedes diesel was "cute". It also gets 15 mpg and she, the wise woman, said diesel was going to go up to $5.00.
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Old 11-24-2011, 07:54 AM   #34
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

My wife & I don't RV (used to) or cruise. We decide where we want to go, head out and towards dark start looking for a motel. (No reservations.) We have stayed in some real dumps along with some of the nicest places in the US. The "adventure" component of not having reservations has resulted in some great laughs, comfort, discomfort, concern, amazement and fun! :coffeecup:
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:27 AM   #35
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

"NO RESEVERVATIONS"

I do'nt understand people that need reservations.

How insecure!

I'm going to be watching Anthony Bordain's new show but like the "No Reservations" name of the old show better. Perhaps when I understand the title of the new one *....
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Old 11-24-2011, 08:33 AM   #36
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

I enjoy knowing that the drool on my pillow is mine each night. And if I've got bedbugs or other creepy crawlys around, they're MY creepy crawlys, not something left from the derelict that rented the room and slept it off there last night. I've been in too many hotel/motel rooms when the guests were "sick" with whatever and called 911, to ever want to actually try to sleep in one. This is both high rent and low rent places. You'd be amazed what victims of tragedy bring into the Sheraton and Hilton rooms. And if you ever get to watch a live CSI type investigation in a motel room with the different light waves to check for blood spatter or other uhm, fluids, you won't want to ever sit on the furniture. But hey, some people like sharing.

A quick one day tour thru each tourist*town just doesn't give me the whole feeling of having seen it. Wandering around the town for a few days gives you a much better feeling of how life really is in different parts of the country. We're in Ottine/Luling part of Texas right now. Driving thru Luling one smells crude oil wafting thru on the wind. Looking around you see that there are dozens of working oil wells in town. Most have been decorated so the working arm isn't just an iron beam but instead it looks like Jiminy Cricket, or two kids on a teeter totter. The elementary school has a couple working wells in their front yard. Driving from one tourist spot to another would not include a stop in Luling, but the more relaxed motorhome style allows us to see these things.

Anyone who believes driving a motorhome isn't a challenge worthy of their skills hasn't taken a big rig through any sizable towns. We occasionally stay at an Elks Club or an RV park downtown for the convenience of walking to points of interest, theaters etc. We are 63' tip to tail, roughly the same as an OTR semi, but we have a long wheelbase up front instead of the relatively short wheelbase like a semi. Unfamiliar streets, gps directions that don't always show the current road configuration and dozens of other vehicles all vying to not get caught behind the RV. Remember with the tow car, you can't back up under any circumstances without unhitching the tow and driving it seperately. Imagine a half dozen boats trying to moor in adjacent spots with a 40 mph crosswind. That's about the pucker factor. Fire trucks and city busses navigate the same streets everyday so it can be done, but familiarity of streets and courtesy from other drivers is a little better for those rigs. (plus force of law, Yielding to busses is mandatory in many places)

Finally I've posted some pictures from out my front window yesterday. The roadway is Park Road 11, the deer are 75 feet directly in front of where we're parked. They browsed for 45 minutes until a car came by on the road out front. It's not all freeway.

Old Stone just asked about how crowded the RV parks were and about reservations. We made reservations last year for Disneyland over Christmas and New Year. Other than that we never reserve in advance because then we're on a time schedule. We will occasionally call the morning of our arrival,*just to make sure there is a spot available and decide if we need to make other plans before we get there. The caveat is that we are traveling in the off season, winter. We're on the boat during the summer so that would be a totally different can of worms. The State Parks right now are packed for the thanksgiving weekend so we're in a private Elks Club park with plenty of room. Last week we were in a State Park for 7 days and there were probably 8 other campsites in use of the 50 something that were available.

Ken

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Old 11-24-2011, 09:34 AM   #37
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

Ditto what Ken said. I literally can't sleep if its not my own bed. And its not entirely the thought of the unknown grunge that I'm sharing the room with but I suppose that does enter into it.

If you're going to RV then in my opinion you need to get off the superslabs. My current client has sent me on some real wild goose chases across North America and along the way we've seen some neat places that we would never have found otherwise. We've also spent a lot of time off the main roads in Canada. I referred earlier to Sandon & Kaslo. Sandon is a ghost town in the BC interior - there's a road through the "Valley of the Ghosts" that connects Kaslo to New Denver and Sandon is about midpoint on that road. Anybody who thinks driving a motorhome is child's play or boring needs to travel that road after dark some time. I chased a bear for about half a mile down that road one time, he kept looking back over his should as if to say "you still there????" The switchbacks on that road are so tight that I was looking out the ticket window to see the road ahead. I also referred to Missinnipi - according to the map Missinnipi, Saskatchewan is on #2 highway but its a highway unlike most others you have ever seen. And like Ken we've been in some tricky urban situations like the time the sign on the interstate said "Charleston visitor information centre, next exit" so we turned off expecting some 3 acre parking lot along the freeway. Instead we would our way deep into the heart of Charleston with no easy escape until we finally found the information kiosk in downtown Charleston. We blocked about 10 parking spots at the information booth and walked down to the waterfront for crab cakes.
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Old 11-24-2011, 11:51 AM   #38
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Sold Boat, Bought RV?

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charles wrote:

We tell freinds who come up with some of the same criticisms as Marin, that we can be as solitary as we wish and sleep in our own bed.
Given my job that has been taking me all around the world for the last 21 years, not sleeping in my own bed is something that doesn't bother me at all.* So that aspect of RVing is irrelevant to me.

I intellectually understand the attractions you guys have been listing, but I'm sorry but it just sounds staggeringly boring.* As to the challenge of driving a "big rig" through a town, been there, done that, got the T-shirt although not with an RV.* The town streets don't move, their surfaces don't hump up into all sorts of waves, there is no current and the wind is not a factor unless it's a hurricane you're driving through.* So in my book, and my wife's, we see no interesting challenges whatsoever in the actual operation of an RV.* What's the GEICO phrase--- "It's so simple even a cave man can do it." :-)

I could certainly see taking up RVing if all other options were closed.* Couldn't boat, couldn't fly, couldn't travel internationally, couldn't hike, couldn't ride horses, etc. due due to physical restrictions.* RVing would* be world's better than sitting in the front room watching the grass grow, no question.

So as a last resort sort of activity, we'd probably be inclined to take it up, too, in some form or other.* The former boaters we know who now RV have all done so for this basic reason.* It's the only form of "cruising" they're able of doing anymore.* Fortunately we're not in that position yet, and we hope we never are although never say never.

No activity other than breathing is right for everyone.* We know plenty of people who RV and love it for the same reasons you all have been listing.* Their experiences are no less enjoyable and valid to them as ours with the plane and the boats.* But the original question was has anyone switched from boating to RVing and then come back to boating.* My response is that we would never leave boating in the first place, not unless we had no choice for fianancial or physical reasons.* From where we sit, RVing is a very poor substitute for boating.*

At least boating in this region, where there is a lifetime of exploring and experiences up the coast.* If we boated in a place like southern California where the cruising destinations are far fewer, as Walt has stated, or the Gulf or the ICW where the landscape has no appeal to us at all, I suppose switching over to RVing could have more appeal at some point as it would allow us to travel to places that are geographically more interesting.*

But fortunately we don't live in a place like that.* While we love taking vacations in Europe and whatnot, in all my travels so far I have not found anywhere I'd rather be than the west coast from Washington up through SE Alaska.* The runners up I have seen (so far) are Maine, the Canadian maritimes, northern Scotland, and Norway.* And in all these places, I think the best way to experience them is by boat.


-- Edited by Marin on Thursday 24th of November 2011 12:54:54 PM
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Old 11-24-2011, 11:53 AM   #39
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RE: Sold Boat, Bought RV?

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nomadwilly wrote:
I do'nt understand people that need reservations.

How insecure!

*
If you were heading off to China, as we are about to do for several weeks of filming all over that country, you would probably change your mind :-)
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Old 11-25-2011, 04:31 AM   #40
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Sold Boat, Bought RV?

"From where we sit, RVing is a very poor substitute for boating. "

It is an adjunct to boating,

Just like a boat , we see an RV as a utility too.

Useful for a purpose.

In our case it is far easier to RV our snowbird lifestyle , with a 35ft bus pulling a small trailer.

The RV visit to Nat. parks , caves or small out of the way places is a bonus .

After decades flying a bus , I LOVE MY OWN BED!! and no junk food!.


-- Edited by FF on Friday 25th of November 2011 05:35:36 AM
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