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Old 09-03-2015, 12:04 PM   #1
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sliding glass doors?

Can someone explain how a boat can be seaworthy with them?



Is this a common build?

Anyone removed them and installed perhaps a small window and a real wood framed door?
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Old 09-03-2015, 12:11 PM   #2
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You will find many things on boats that you may consider unseaworthy. Simply it all depends on your planned use. I wouldn't plan on crossing an ocean with it, but cruising inland waters, bays, and near coastal runs between inlets on nice weather days, sure, why not.

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Old 09-03-2015, 12:40 PM   #3
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Ted nailed it. We have those on our Sea Ray. Is the boat an ocean crosser? Nope, it's a coastal cruiser and those doors are great.


I can't speak to those doors in the photo, but a couple of years ago I had the rollers replaced at the bottom of our doors. It took two guys to lift them out of the track they ride in. They are definitely not your run of the mill, lightweight home patio door.
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo2015 View Post
Can someone explain how a boat can be seaworthy with them?



Is this a common build?

Anyone removed them and installed perhaps a small window and a real wood framed door?
We have that boat (mainship 350/390) and love the doors. The boat has been all over the Great Lakes, ICW, the loop and even to the Bahamas. She has seen waves over 8' and the sliders were never a problem. Gives a great view astern and very easy to get in and out of the boat. Remember, these are not Nordhavns, never built for or intended to cross oceans.

By the way, whats going on with the head liner in the left corner? Water ingestion from the bridge??
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:23 PM   #5
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First you need to define "seaworthy". Very few boats are open ocean "seaworthy" in all conditions.

For it's intended use they are fine, few boats are sunk by sea conditions compared to neglect and stupidity.

What conditions will it be operated in?
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:42 PM   #6
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Well I've been a sailor for 40 years just struck me as odd to see such an expanse of glass that can take on water if it was open or broken.

I would rather see a door with half glass and small window next to it kinda like
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:47 PM   #7
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Well I've been a sailor for 40 years just struck me as odd to see such an expanse of glass that can take on water if it was open or broken.

I would rather see a door with half glass and small window next to it kinda like

Well then that's what you should have.

Hopefully that glass is tempered, I guarantee you that the SGD is.
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:48 PM   #8
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While I don't,




there are many boats with open or sliding-glass-door, stern-facing openings in the protected San Francisco estuary without ill effect.



PS. My rubber-gasketed, dogged-down doors haven't leaked yet.
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Old 09-03-2015, 02:19 PM   #9
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Well I've been a sailor for 40 years just struck me as odd to see such an expanse of glass that can take on water if it was open or broken.

I would rather see a door with half glass and small window next to it kinda like

We've got sliding glass. Locked in either open or closed position when underway (99% of time, closed).

I think the glass is stronger than some of the other installations we've seen.

Given our normal boating areas, if we've got significant worrisome water coming over the transom, we've maybe got way more problems than a minor detail like a sliding glass door.

Could happen if we tried to back down violently on a big marlin or whatever in steep seas... but since we don't fish like that, where they are... no worries.

-Chris
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Old 09-03-2015, 02:28 PM   #10
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Another benefit of the slider is the screen door. With the center forward window open (we have a screen on that too) you can leave the slider open and get some great ventilation with NO BUGS. Also visibility astern when operating from the lower station is very good.
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Old 09-03-2015, 02:51 PM   #11
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For the designed purpose of boats with sliding doors open to the cockpit it is fine if you operate within that realm. If you get flooding from a broken or open door, you are in conditions way outside of the boat's design intent or your well on your way to the bottom anyway.
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Old 09-03-2015, 03:42 PM   #12
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They are probably more seaworthy than foreword facing glass doors.
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Old 09-03-2015, 03:58 PM   #13
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The bridge water intrusion can likely be solved by re-caulking the drain tubes for the under-seat storage on the aft bottom of the side benches. Poor design....
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Old 09-03-2015, 05:33 PM   #14
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"Can someone explain how a boat can be seaworthy with them?"

Simple, you don't drive it backwards into a large sea.

"Is this a common build?"

Yes

"Anyone removed them and installed perhaps a small window and a real wood framed door?"

I doubt it. Why?
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