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Old 07-03-2015, 10:20 PM   #41
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I also thought the price was reasonable for all that it did, but again CRS forces me to not quote the price.
I am guessing you mean Colo-Rectal Surgery, but maybe you can choose from a list and tell me about CRS.


Cambridge Reference Sequence, used in mitochondrial DNA testing
Canada Remote Systems, a now-defunct bulletin board system based in Toronto
Carrier Routing System, a large-scale core router
Caudal regression syndrome, a rare congenital disorder
Center for Resource Solutions, a renewable energy policy nonprofit
Chinese restaurant syndrome, purportedly caused by the flavor enhancer glutamate
Cold Rolled Slitter, see Roll Slitting
Cold Rolled Steel
Colorectal surgery, also known as proctology
Commercial Resupply Services, a NASA contract to deliver supplies to space
Common reference string, in cryptography
Computer reservations system (or Central Reservation System), a computerised system used for travel bookings
Congenital rubella syndrome, a disease passed from mother to fetus
Coordinate reference system, used to locate geographical entities
Creation Research Society, a Christian research group that engages in creation science
Cutaneous radiation syndrome, a syndrome that results from acute radiation exposure to the skin
Seychellois Creole (ISO 639-3 language code), a French-based creole language of the Seychelles
Blue Shirts Society, also known as China Reconstruction Society, a Fascist clique and secret police or para-military force in the Republic of China between 1931–38
Career Retention Specialist, Marine who is responsible for enlisted retention in U.S. Marine Corps units
Commission of Railway Safety, the rail safety authority in India
Common Reporting Standard, an information standard for automatic exchange of information
Compagnies Républicaines de Sécurité, the French riot control forces
Community Relations Service, Department of Justice office for community relations and civil rights
Congressional Research Service, the public policy research arm of the United States Congress
Center for Resource Solutions, a public agency in the United States
Co-operative Retail Services, a former co-operative society in the United Kingdom
Croatian Register of Shipping, an independent classification society working on the marine market
Camp Randall Stadium, home of the Wisconsin Badgers collegiate football team
Camp Rising Sun, an international leadership program for youth development
Catholic Relief Services, an American international humanitarian agency
Chemical Reference Substance, an abbreviation used in Pharmacopoeias
Child Rebel Soldier, a hip hop supergroup composed of Kanye West, Lupe Fiasco, and Pharrell
Classic Rock Society, a UK-based organisation to promote classic and progressive rock music
Classroom Response System, an interactive teaching tool using "clicker questions"
C.R.S. Ordo Clericorum Regularium a Somascha (Somaschi Fathers), a charitable religious congregation
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Old 07-04-2015, 12:41 AM   #42
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Mark-- We do as you are doing although I just lean out the starboard door rather than stand on the deck outside.

A very nice feature of our older GB is that back in the early 70s the controls on GBs were "reversed," The shifters are on the right side of the control console and the power levers are over on the left side with the upper helm cable chase between them. This means that I can easily lean out the door or even step outside if I really wanted to and still reach the shifters for maneuvering.

Later GBs have the controls in the more common location of shifters on the left and power levers on the right. If our boat had this configuration I would not be able to maneuver while leaning (or stepping) outside because I woudn't be able to reach the shifters.

At first I wondered if this "reversed" arrangement was unique to our boat as the 1991 GB we used to charter had them in the "normal" configuration. But looking at wood older glass GBs, I found they're all like ours.

It seems a minor advantage, to be able to lean or step outside on the main deck and still maneuver the boat, but we've found it to be a great advantage at times. We don't single-hand our boat, but it's still an advantage as when picking up a mooring buoy or docking.

We never run our boat from the flying bridge as we both hate the sight picture from up there as far as close-in maneuvering is concerned and we don't like the 'disconnected from the boat" feeling we get when running from up there in any circumstances, maneuvering or cruising.

The advantage you illustrate in your photo is an important one, I think.
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Old 07-04-2015, 12:44 AM   #43
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Recommend anybody who lives in bull rail country to make the same mod...those whimpy little boat hook ends would never have given such a secure hold
Very cool idea. Where did you get the large hook and how are you holding it to the shaft? It appears to be tape wrapped around a bunch if times. If it is, does it seem strong enough if you really had to haul on it?
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Old 07-04-2015, 08:45 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by harbor950 View Post
I am guessing you mean Colo-Rectal Surgery, but maybe you can choose from a list and tell me about CRS.


Cambridge Reference Sequence, used in mitochondrial DNA testing
Canada Remote Systems, a now-defunct bulletin board system based in Toronto
Carrier Routing System, a large-scale core router
Caudal regression syndrome, a rare congenital disorder
Center for Resource Solutions, a renewable energy policy nonprofit
Chinese restaurant syndrome, purportedly caused by the flavor enhancer glutamate
Cold Rolled Slitter, see Roll Slitting
Cold Rolled Steel
Colorectal surgery, also known as proctology
Commercial Resupply Services, a NASA contract to deliver supplies to space
Common reference string, in cryptography
Computer reservations system (or Central Reservation System), a computerised system used for travel bookings
Congenital rubella syndrome, a disease passed from mother to fetus
Coordinate reference system, used to locate geographical entities
Creation Research Society, a Christian research group that engages in creation science
Cutaneous radiation syndrome, a syndrome that results from acute radiation exposure to the skin
Seychellois Creole (ISO 639-3 language code), a French-based creole language of the Seychelles
Blue Shirts Society, also known as China Reconstruction Society, a Fascist clique and secret police or para-military force in the Republic of China between 1931–38
Career Retention Specialist, Marine who is responsible for enlisted retention in U.S. Marine Corps units
Commission of Railway Safety, the rail safety authority in India
Common Reporting Standard, an information standard for automatic exchange of information
Compagnies Républicaines de Sécurité, the French riot control forces
Community Relations Service, Department of Justice office for community relations and civil rights
Congressional Research Service, the public policy research arm of the United States Congress
Center for Resource Solutions, a public agency in the United States
Co-operative Retail Services, a former co-operative society in the United Kingdom
Croatian Register of Shipping, an independent classification society working on the marine market
Camp Randall Stadium, home of the Wisconsin Badgers collegiate football team
Camp Rising Sun, an international leadership program for youth development
Catholic Relief Services, an American international humanitarian agency
Chemical Reference Substance, an abbreviation used in Pharmacopoeias
Child Rebel Soldier, a hip hop supergroup composed of Kanye West, Lupe Fiasco, and Pharrell
Classic Rock Society, a UK-based organisation to promote classic and progressive rock music
Classroom Response System, an interactive teaching tool using "clicker questions"
C.R.S. Ordo Clericorum Regularium a Somascha (Somaschi Fathers), a charitable religious congregation

CRS= Can't Remember S**T
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Old 07-04-2015, 08:56 AM   #45
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Hopefully such device comes with a lanyard so it does not join two of my cell phones.
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Old 07-04-2015, 09:19 AM   #46
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Wouldn't it be cool to have a small, all function remote control box that a guy could hold in the palm of his hand whilst positioned anywhere on the vessel! I'll bet such a device already exists somewhere.
yes they have a remote control box to use for docking,but ones that i have used only are able to shift with at idle speed. they work good on twins
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Old 07-04-2015, 10:08 AM   #47
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Side-door access from helm station to the deck is my strong preference. It's also true that with enough planning and preparation, a single-hander can do nearly anything that a two-person crew can do - sometimes just a little slower.

Even with a deckhand aboard, for the person on the helm to be able to let go of the wheel and quickly step out on deck is a safety consideration. When considering a motor vessel for purchase, if I see that I'd have to leave the helm and exit the aft end of the main cabin to get on deck, I stop looking then and there. To me then (for example) a 36' Grand Banks, or even a 42', would be easier / safer to single hand than a 32' GB, as the latter has no side doors.

When single-handing or boating with novice passengers, my practice is to prepare a breast line near to amidships, maneuver alongside the intended dock space, and make that line secure enough to hold the boat alongside. At my leisure, I can then go from end to end of the boat, making fast the other necessary lines and adjusting fenders.

Whenever I see a helm station set up on the port side, I ask myself why that arrangement bothers me so much. I can't fully explain it, but starboard or centerline helms just seem "right" to me. Maybe it's just what I grew accustomed to, and maybe that's a good enough reason.
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Old 07-04-2015, 10:11 AM   #48
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I have never had a problem with locking single handed, just be sure to wear your life jacket and have everything laid out correctly....fenders, lines etc...and official #. I don't think I have every been asked by the lock master how many I had as crew.

dan
Our small local lock is about as easy as it gets completely singlehanded. No lock master, just me and my remote control gate controller. Normally one boat at a time. (although two boats under 40ft will fit)

Not much more difficult than driving into the garage at home.
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Old 07-04-2015, 10:54 AM   #49
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Non-singlehandling is only as effective as the crew's performance, sometimes it's way more that than the boat layout hindering you.

Often easier to just plan for a single handed landing and just watch the crew like a hawk until you need to intervene.
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Old 07-04-2015, 12:18 PM   #50
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One thing I see in the above articulated rudder is that the extended surface deploys fast at first and slow toward the end of the rudders swing. I would think the reverse would be preferable and would shop around for a slow at first and fast near the end mechanical actuation. There are probably several different types availible. Maybe not though.
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Old 07-04-2015, 01:24 PM   #51
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I think the fast first, slow last is actually preferable for a boat's rudder. The problem that's trying to be overcome is lack of rudder responsiveness. Having the extended surface deploy faster at first will noticeably increase the boat's responsiveness. Having it deploy slowly at first wouldn't provide the effect one is hoping for--- a more responsive boat. If it deploys fast at the end, by that time one has the rudder way over anyway and the boat will respond accordingly. Having the tab, if you will, move a lot at first accelerates the swing of the stern right away, which is what isn't happening with the stock rudder.
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Old 07-04-2015, 03:36 PM   #52
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Saw a great example of being prepared (or not!) helping a friend take his boat through the locks in Seattle yesterday. A huge boat jam at the Locks. The locktender was using both big locks together. That creates a cingle lok roughly 1,200 feet long. Yesterday it ended up with more than 100 boats in the Lock. Only four locktenders, two on each side. Right in front of us a beautiful classic sailboat about 60'+ being ingle handed and right behind him a 30' Cobalt with a young couple. The big lock requires a 30' line with an eye. At low tide, as it was yesterday, the drop is around 20-22'. AS your boat drops, you have to let out line. The guy on the sailboat had his and stern lines prepared, both led to a winch beside the cockpit. As he pulled into the wall, he simply walked forward, handed the bowline to the tender, walked back and handed the stern line to the tender, and tied down. Th Cobalt pulled to the wall with no lines prepared, did not even know if had any long lines, and had no fenders out (great idea to scrape the barnacles off the lock wall!). Took the locktenders about 10 minutes to show him how to tie two lines together, where to put fenders, and how to tie down and then let line out as the boat went down. A big PITA for the locktenders on a day with over 100 boats to get through with each lockthrough.
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Old 07-04-2015, 03:45 PM   #53
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Saw a great example of being prepared (or not!) helping a friend take his boat through the locks in Seattle yesterday. A huge boat jam at the Locks. The locktender was using both big locks together. That creates a cingle lok roughly 1,200 feet long. Yesterday it ended up with more than 100 boats in the Lock. Only four locktenders, two on each side. Right in front of us a beautiful classic sailboat about 60'+ being ingle handed and right behind him a 30' Cobalt with a young couple. The big lock requires a 30' line with an eye. At low tide, as it was yesterday, the drop is around 20-22'. AS your boat drops, you have to let out line. The guy on the sailboat had his and stern lines prepared, both led to a winch beside the cockpit. As he pulled into the wall, he simply walked forward, handed the bowline to the tender, walked back and handed the stern line to the tender, and tied down. Th Cobalt pulled to the wall with no lines prepared, did not even know if had any long lines, and had no fenders out (great idea to scrape the barnacles off the lock wall!). Took the locktenders about 10 minutes to show him how to tie two lines together, where to put fenders, and how to tie down and then let line out as the boat went down. A big PITA for the locktenders on a day with over 100 boats to get through with each lockthrough.
The information for how to transit all locks is so publicly available, there is no excuse for even a first time user not being prepared. Before we went through the lock you're referring to, we read and looked at videos and still picked a less busy time for our first time there. Even if you're experienced at locks, it makes sense to know the specifics of any new to you. As former owners of a 30' Cobalt, we're appalled and think he should be required to give up his boat...lol. Ok, just kidding, but we don't like his representation of Cobalt owners.

Incidentally, they are consciously increasing the number of boats in each locking to conserve water as they anticipate Lake Washington dropping to it's lowest levels in 28 years.
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Old 07-04-2015, 03:51 PM   #54
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Unless the rivers entering Lake Washington at either end stop flowing Lake Washington's level cannot drop because it's behind a dam. The only thing that will lower the lake level is if they keep using the locks to let water out faster than the rivers can bring it in. If they stop using the locks and the rivers keep flowing the level of Lake Washington (and Lake Union) will stay the same.
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Old 07-04-2015, 03:59 PM   #55
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Marin. I'm not arguing the point, just giving the reasoning the Corps of Engineers has given. Here is a link to their release if you'd like to go read it and argue the logic with them.

Seattle District > Missions > Civil Works > Locks and Dams > Chittenden Locks
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Old 07-04-2015, 04:05 PM   #56
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Marin-the waterflow going into the lake is down substantially. I read yesterday that many creeks in the hills that are usually 12-18" deep are at 6" or less, restricting the salmon's ability to get upstream. Several hatcheries are releasing smolts earlier than normal while there is still water for them to get downstream. My brother-in-law has lived on the lake for almost 20 years, and you can already see that the water level is down.
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Old 07-04-2015, 04:26 PM   #57
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Right. Well, I've lived here 37 years and so the cries of the world is ending is nothing new to me. While the Cedar River and Sammamish Slough flows are down they haven't stopped. If the State and Corp of Engineers were truly concerned about the level of Lakes Washington and Union they would stop the use of the locks except for emergencies. They haven't done that, and so far as I know since I've lived here, they've never done that. Regardless of what the press releases say, as long as they continue to use the locks there is no crisis.

I was told this many years ago during an interview with the then-head of the Corps of Engineers for this region.

That's not to say the level of the lake won't change--- it's been doing that for a zillion years. But it's obviously not going to change enough to cause any legitimate concern (as opposed to the perpetual state of panic the media is always in) or they would halt the operation of the locks.

If they do that, then come let me know. Otherwise it's business as usual around here. Have you noticed that despite Gov. Inslee's crying wolf over the water situation and declaring a state of emergency there have been NO water use restrictions enacted anywhere that I'm aware of. People are watering their lawns and washing their cars to their heart's content over here on the eastside and everywhere else so far as I can determine.
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Old 07-04-2015, 04:58 PM   #58
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Non-singlehandling is only as effective as the crew's performance, sometimes it's way more that than the boat layout hindering you.

Often easier to just plan for a single handed landing and just watch the crew like a hawk until you need to intervene.
In the first year we had our boat things were sometimes sketchy, but my wife and I are non-yelling communicators even in stressful situations. We had no problem in backing out and trying again if need be. (Everyone starts at the bottom of the learning curve).

We had a friend on board and I gave him the prep speach about not jumping to the dock because I had no problem in trying again if things went squirrely, and my wife knows exactly what to do.

Sure enough, as soon as we were close, his eyes glazed over and made a crazy leap to the dock with line in hand, turned, and started hauling on the line.

I was thiiiiiiis close to backing out and dragging him in on purpose, but thought better of it. Sure was tempting though!
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Old 07-04-2015, 05:58 PM   #59
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We had no problem in backing out and trying again if need be. (Everyone starts at the bottom of the learning curve).
Trust me, that's not the bottom of the learning curve. We've had the twin engine boat we use in the PNW for over 17 years now and I would hazard to say we're pretty good at putting it where we want it to be. But backing out or away and going around for another try is still the number one item on our list of defenses against messing up a docking including in our own slip.

We have a short verbal planning discussion prior to everything we do that might present a challenge. So even before entering our home slip we tell each other what we're going to do. And it always includes, "If things aren't looking right I [the person driving] am going to back away and turn [left, right] and go out and turn around and try again."

This way the option to back away is not a last minute "should I or shouldn't I" decision made under pressure but is simply the execution of a maneuver that was already planned to be carried out under specific conditions, in this case not being set up properly for the docking.

The cause could be current or wind or both, or simply a misjudgment on the part of the driver. But regardless of the cause, if the situation looks wrong the backing away was part of the plan from the outset.

So as far as I'm concerned your backing out and trying again is not a sign of someone at the bottom of a learning curve, it indicates someone who has their wits about them when they're operating a boat. Which in my book puts them quite a ways up the learning curve, higher in fact that a lot of people who may have much more time in control of a boat.
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Old 07-04-2015, 06:49 PM   #60
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Marin re the locks the summer's just begun.

Hang on to your lily pads we may not get up the Samamish at all this year.
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