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Old 06-28-2015, 11:47 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I am forced to practice the above, religiously. My only set of controls are on the fly bridge. (which is the only thing I don't like about my boat) Since they are electronic & If I decide to keep them, it's a simple matter of adding another set in the cockpit or the salon. (Just string some wire and add the controls.)
Just add a plug and wired remote. Then you can move to either side.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:15 PM   #22
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Having operated boats with both port & starboard helms, I must disagree that watching the "danger-zone" is easier fron a starboard helm. To do this from a starboard helm requires a position akin to sitting in the corner. Also posts and pillars loom large looking past them from up close.
With a port helm watching the "danger-zone" is easier & more comfortable as you do not have to stare into the corner.
My boat isn't great too when driving from starboard...but it definitely depends on the boat.

At night, looking out the door on the starboard side is much better than looking through the windows...but then again..on my boat...not all.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:27 PM   #23
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Just add a plug and wired remote. Then you can move to either side.
?????? What kind of remote? A controller?
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:08 PM   #24
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I've been single handing my 40' Willard for years with no problem. What's more, my trawler is a wide body sedan with no side decks. When entering or leaving moorage I operate the boat from the flybridge. That said, I've fitted out my boat with an articulating rudder and 8 hp bow thruster that works off a remote control; I step off the boat, tie off the stern line and use the remote to keep the boat at the dock.
Attachment 41495Attachment 41496

That centerline walkway to the bow is a really nice feature. I wish I had that. My trip to the bow is a fairly harrowing balancing along the 6" side decks. I suspect I look a lot like this when I go up there:

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Old 06-28-2015, 01:32 PM   #25
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Mark...if you were single-handed, who took the photo?
Perla took that photo so I wasn't single-handed. Guilty as charged, but shown to highlight immediate deck access from boat controls.

Perla took this photo when I was alone onboard, beginning a four-hour voyage to the boatyard:



I was leaving the berth, but the undocumented view of arrival would be the same.
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Old 06-28-2015, 04:46 PM   #26
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Went out for a solo jaunt this morning, and my boat hook modified for bull rails saved the day.

You see, somehow, (me-thinks it was a squadron of highly evolved thumb sized horse flies working in unison) Badger went from neutral into forward just as we were about to kiss the berth.

Luckily, I had the hook out the pilothouse door and fully engaged around the bull rail to keep us from being blown off, which kept us in place until the momentary "What the **** is happening?!!?" sense of disbelief had passed.

Recommend anybody who lives in bull rail country to make the same mod...those whimpy little boat hook ends would never have given such a secure hold

Note to self while docking; keep elbows low...keep elbows low...keep elbows low...
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Old 06-28-2015, 10:16 PM   #27
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Mark, I agree I also "back to starboard" and from the helm I am right there at the mid ship cleat and ready to tie off.

Firefly is easy to single hand.
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Old 06-29-2015, 11:05 AM   #28
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Single handling is easy w/o twin screws or thrusters if you're just landing on a float or dock w/o much wind. But making a landing in a slip w another boat there is challenging. Thankfully Willy's fairly deep so falling off w the wind is lessened but still an issue. I back in and having someone on the bow to fend off the other boat is good. But w enough fenders it's easy enough. Haven't done it enough yet to know how "exciting" it will get yet. I almost never go out by myself though as Chris is almost always w me. I SH a lot in the past w my Albin though and that was easy but still only most of the time. Wind was a much bigger issue and things happened much faster w the lighter boat. But control response is much faster too.

Three crew is ideal. One at the helm and one on each side or end as the situation pans out.

Murray,
Yes I miss the bull rails. What kind of tubing did you use on your tricky stick?
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Old 06-29-2015, 11:21 AM   #29
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This thread is really interesting to me since I single hand 95% of the time. (My wife's hobby is riding her horse.) I'm listing the boats I've single handed to make a point that almost every boat can be operated by one person if you really know your boat and do some pre-docking planning. I'm no expert but product knowledge (knowing your boat) and its eccentricities is the most important thing I can think of.

48' Offshore Yacht Fisher.........Twin Diesel- No Bow thruster
42' Ocean Alexander sedan...... " " " "
38' Mediterranean Sport Fisher.. " " " "
54' Mediterranean Sport Fisher.. " " Bow Thruster
35' Tiara Open......................... " " No Bow Thruster
29' Chaparal............................ Twin Gasser -No Bow thruster
30' Mainship............................ Single diesel -Bow Thruster
32 Halvorsen Gourmet cruiser.... " " " "
42' Ocean Alexander Sedan........Twin Diesel- Bow Thruster

What have I learned in my 74 years on the planet? Know your boat! (and get a bow thruster as it covers up a lot of bad judgement when entering a slip. )
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Old 06-29-2015, 03:01 PM   #30
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Murray,
Yes I miss the bull rails. What kind of tubing did you use on your tricky stick?
Cheap hardware store shelf bracket affixed with hockey tape (I keep it collapsed inside the pilothouse door, so rust hasn't been an issue).

Worked like a charm yesterday, holding Badger's bow from hitting the end of the slip while layers of situational awareness unfogged (about 2 to 3 seconds)
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Old 06-30-2015, 09:57 AM   #31
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My view after single handing 13,000+ miles, 160+ locks, and 100's of different marinas: The more a single hander will travel and see different situations, the more important easy/quick access to dock lines/decks becomes. Age and agility also play a part of course. On the other hand, if the majority of docking will be done at a home dock, or well known docks that access may be less critical.

My criteria for a single handed loop boat included: A lower helm, doors on both sides of the cabin, and walk around decks. With this set up (on my Marine Trader 36) I can loop any dock line on a cleat or lock line/bollard and return to the helm with that line in my hand. This set up gives me maximum flexibility and control of the boat in the wide variety of situations I encounter.

On the other hand, with a bow and stern thruster (I have only a stern thruster) with a remote control, a single hander could dock just about anywhere regardless of how the rest of the boat is set up.

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Old 06-30-2015, 01:00 PM   #32
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Totally agree with pilothouse doors, three major locks on Tennessee River singlehanded, no issues.
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Old 06-30-2015, 02:23 PM   #33
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I heard that some locks enforce minimum crew requirement. Isn't it true? What is a protocol for going through a lock without help?
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Old 06-30-2015, 03:35 PM   #34
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I heard that some locks enforce minimum crew requirement. Isn't it true? What is a protocol for going through a lock without help?
That's more a major canal issue. For instance Welland Canal and the Panama Canal both have minimum crew requirements. I'm sure there are others but I'm not aware of other locks in the US that require additional crew.

Protocol is the same as with crew. If you're going through single handed you need to have the experience to do it well. I don't think it's difficult with well laid out and equipped boats up to 50' or so. The vast majority of river locks in the US are relatively benign.

I know in some of the canals in Europe the second person would be essential.
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Old 06-30-2015, 10:05 PM   #35
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I have never had a problem with locking single handed, just be sure to wear your life jacket and have everything laid out correctly....fenders, lines etc...and official #. I don't think I have every been asked by the lock master how many I had as crew.

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Old 07-01-2015, 02:19 AM   #36
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At night, looking out the door on the starboard side is much better than looking through the windows...but then again..on my boat...not all.
Not an unusual but brief position while underway, done from both starboard and port doors:

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Old 07-02-2015, 11:00 AM   #37
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Locks, French Canadian locks require two people, St Lawrence requires two, Welland requires three. As far as I know, all other U.S. Locks can be single handed.
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Old 07-03-2015, 10:08 AM   #38
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Question for nwboater

Interesting thread, can you tell me what you mean by an "articulating rudder"? If ignorance is bliss I must be ecstatic
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Old 07-03-2015, 10:18 AM   #39
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Interesting thread, can you tell me what you mean by an "articulating rudder"? If ignorance is bliss I must be ecstatic
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Old 07-03-2015, 08:45 PM   #40
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Wouldn't it be cool to have a small, all function remote control box that a guy could hold in the palm of his hand whilst positioned anywhere on the vessel! I'll bet such a device already exists somewhere.
I saw just such a device at the Palm Beach boat show this spring. I am thinking how much I would love to have it. The system I saw tied everything to a joystick and when you wanted left it controlled prop/s, thruster/s, etc via a joystick or remote.

Forgot the name, but can be Googled. I also thought the price was reasonable for all that it did, but again CRS forces me to not quote the price.
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